No Performance Pack + Standard Seats - 2015 Ford Mustang GT

2015 Ford Mustang GT Long-Term Road Test

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2015 Ford Mustang GT: No Performance Pack + Standard Seats

April 17, 2015

2015 Ford Mustang GT

Back in February, I wrote that there were a few elements on our long-term 2015 Ford Mustang GT that I would leave off the build sheet. The first was the GT Performance package, second were the 19-inch black wheels, and third were the Recaro sport seats. Well, I recently got a change to drive an equally orange Mustang GT without any of those items. So, did I like it better?

Absolutely. It was like a revelation: I do like the new Mustang after all!

The ride is substantially better without the GT Performance package's more aggressive suspension and chassis tuning (strut tower brace, upsized rear sway bar, heavy-duty front springs, K-brace). It's a little cushier without actually being cushy, and you don't get the same jittery motions.

The smaller, 18-inch wheels surely contribute to this as well and I think they look substantially better to boot, not only because they aren't painted black (I still don't understand the appeal), but they're of a classic design that works inherently well with the Mustang. As I noted earlier, I don't think our long-term Mustang handles well enough to really warrant the day-to-day punishment.

Then there are the standard seats. The Recaros in our long-termer are manual only, with height adjustment only on the driver side (my tiny wife is not a fan of staring at the dashboard). You also can't get them with heating or ventilation. Not so the standard seats.

With eight-way power adjustment (admittedly optional), it's much easier to get comfortable. The seats themselves may not hug your body as the Recaros do, but they do a good enough job and I'm guessing that'll be just fine for those of broader beam. I know our snug Recaro sport seats in the Focus ST had quite a few detractors.

The short-term Mustang GT test car in question also had an automatic transmission. I'd still opt for the manual, but I couldn't find fault with the auto. Besides, it makes it easier to do burn outs.

Really, this just underlines how carefully you have to select options and thoroughly test drive different permutations of a car like the Mustang. It isn't an off-the-shelf Honda Accord, where most primary elements are the same whether you get an LX or EX-L. Select the wrong options box with the Mustang and you can end up with uncomfortable seats and a ride that's too rough.

Alternatively, someone else could end up with not enough lateral support and handling that isn't as sharp as it can be. Personally, I think that makes the car-buying process and cars in general far more interesting. 

James Riswick, Automotive Editor


2015 Ford Mustang

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  • Full Review
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  • Long-Term

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