Hard To See and Be Seen - 2015 Dodge Viper GT Long-Term Road Test

2015 Dodge Viper GT Long-Term Road Test

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2015 Dodge Viper GT: Hard To See and Be Seen

by Travis Langness, Social Media Editor on December 21, 2015

2014 Ram 1500 EcoDiesel

It may be long, wide and boisterous, but our long-term 2015 Dodge Viper is also really low. The top of the roof is just 49 inches off the ground. Most midsize sedans are seven or eight inches higher off the ground and a typical crossover like a Honda CR-V has a roof that is nearly 15 inches higher than the Viper's.

And with many of the other cars on the road sitting so much higher, a low-slung sports car can easily get lost in the fray.

Part of the problem is the Viper's dark blue (GTS-R Blue Pearl) paint job. Darker colors are harder to see. Our long-term Jaguar F-Type almost never suffered from this issue thanks to its fantastic Firesand orange paint job. The F-Type was also three inches taller at the roofline.

Being cut off on such a regular basis normally means I turn to judicious use of the horn, but the Viper's horn is surprisingly unresponsive to the touch. Basically, I have to punch the center of the steering wheel with all I've got just some noise out of it. I've often hit the center of the steering two or three times to warn a fellow motorist of impending doom, but gotten no noise at all. When I eventually do get the Dodge to honk, it makes a noise barely worth mentioning.

I've given up on this annoying sparring match with the steering wheel and taken to engaging the loud pedal instead. It's not an elegant solution, but it seems to garner much more attention than a weak horn. So far in my audible social experiment, it's also kept the Viper's corner panel free of dents.

Travis Langness, Social Media Editor

  • Full Review
  • Pricing & Specs
  • Road Tests
  • Comparison
  • Long-Term

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