Getting the Right Keys, Week 3 - 2017 Chrysler Pacifica Long-Term Road Test

2017 Chrysler Pacifica Long-Term Road Test

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2017 Chrysler Pacifica: Getting the Right Keys, Week 3

by Cameron Rogers, Associate Editor on September 27, 2016

2017 Chrysler Pacifica

Our journey to get the correct keys to our 2017 Chrysler Pacifica entered its third week (Week 1 | Week 2 | Weeks 4-6) when a porter from Russell Westbrook CDJR picked up the Pacifica from our office at 10 o'clock on Monday morning and took it (and all three keys) to the dealer.

He returned a few minutes before my requested drop-off time of 3 p.m. and handed me three keys. They all said "KeySense" on the back. I sighed and buried my head in my hands.

The two of us went to the parking garage, and I tested the keys to make sure they worked properly. Sure enough, the new KeySense-branded keys started the car in its normal mode, while the true KeySense key started it up in KeySense (i.e., limited-functionality teen/valet) mode. When I got back to my desk, I attached tags to the keys to denote which ones were the "good" keys and which one was "bad." I grabbed one of the normal keys and took the Pacifica home.

When I went to the gym Tuesday night, I threw my wallet and house keys in the glovebox so I wouldn't have to lug them around. I removed the physical key from the fob to lock the glovebox. The cylinder wouldn't turn. I tried several more times to no avail. I stepped out of the car and inserted the key into the driver door lock, praying as I turned it.

Nothing.

I jumped back into the car and, to my surprise, found the two inoperable fobs in the central console. I removed their physical keys in hopes that the techs at the dealership had somehow cut the right keys but put them in the wrong fobs. Those also did not work.

On Wednesday morning, I grabbed the two remaining keys from Schmidt's desk (the fake, "good" KeySense fob and the real, "bad" KeySense fob) and attempted to unlock the door and glovebox with their keys. Those also didn't work.

I called Joe, who again expressed his incredulity at the situation and again was on his day off. He vowed to get back to me on Friday when he was back in the office. On Friday, Joe emailed me to make sure I had tried all five keys, as the service advisor that handled everything on Monday insisted the keys were cut to match the car. I assured him that all five keys were tried. He told me that Moe, the service advisor in question, would get in contact with me by the end of the day to move forward. I said that was fine.

Moe didn't call back by the end of the day. He called on Saturday. Moe said he would order new blanks and they would be at the dealership on Tuesday.

Current key count: 5
Chrysler-branded keys (fobs don't work, keys don't work): 2 
KeySense-branded keys (fob works in KeySense mode, keys don't work): 1
KeySense-branded keys (fob works in Normal mode, keys don't work): 2

Cameron Rogers, Associate Editor @ 2,250 miles

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