Chevrolet Malibu Limited Review - Research New & Used Chevrolet Malibu Limited Models | Edmunds

Chevrolet Malibu Limited Review

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Chevrolet introduced an all-new Malibu for 2016, but this isn't it. The 2016 Chevrolet Malibu Limited was a continuation of the old-shape 2015 Malibu, kept in production for an extra year to meet the needs of rental companies, corporate fleet managers and dealerships that couldn't wait for the new car. A few key options were left out, most notably the Malibu's optional 2.0-liter turbocharged engine. But other than that, the 2016 Malibu Limited was more of the same.

This was not necessarily a bad thing. The new-for-2016 Malibu was certainly a stunner, but the 2016 Malibu Limited was a solid family car that performed well in most areas, though a lack of backseat space and mediocre fuel economy were two of its primary drawbacks. That said, the Malibu Limited's quiet interior, comfortable ride and outstanding crash test scores made it an appealing (if somewhat dated) choice, even when compared to its roomier rivals.

Used Chevrolet Malibu Limited Models
The Chevrolet Malibu Limited was sold only for 2016. It was essentially a rebadged, stripped-down version of the outgoing Malibu (reviewed separately), which had been replaced for 2016. The Malibu Limited lost some of the high-end features of the old Malibu, including the optional 2.0-liter turbocharged engine, but was otherwise identical to the 2015 model of that car. Chevrolet dropped it from the lineup after 2016.

The Malibu Limited was powered by a 2.5-liter four-cylinder engine that delivered a healthy 197 hp and 191 lb-ft of torque and drove the front wheels through a six-speed automatic transmission. It had adequate acceleration, though its EPA combined fuel economy estimate of 27 mpg trailed the competition. The Malibu Limited delivered a quiet and smooth ride, though its handling, while certainly adequate, wasn't exactly thrilling.

Chevrolet offered the 2016 Malibu Limited in LS, LT and LTZ trims. LS models were basic cars aimed at the rental market, though they did come nicely equipped with Bluetooth, a driver's seat with power height adjustment and a subscription-based 4G LTE Wi-Fi hotspot. LT models had nicer trim and a display stereo, while the LTZs featured leather upholstery, dual-zone climate control and other luxury-oriented features.

Overall, the Malibu Limited's cabin was a pleasant place, although it was within an anonymous exterior package. The car's controls looked confusing at first glance, due largely to a cluster of look-alike buttons on the center stack, but the layout was fairly easy to learn. The optional MyLink touchscreen stereo was comprehensive but a bit slow to respond. Trunk space was generous at 16.3 cubic feet. We found the front seats to be comfortable, but thanks to the Malibu Limited's short wheelbase, rear passengers suffered from a severe lack of legroom. In the end, the Malibu Limited's minuses outweighed the pluses, putting it at the back of the midsize sedan pack.

If you are looking for older years, visit our used Chevrolet Malibu Limited page.


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