Vehicle-to-Vehicle Technology To Add Cost, Save Lives, Government Report Says | Edmunds

Vehicle-to-Vehicle Technology To Add Cost, Save Lives, Government Report Says


Just the Facts:
  • Vehicle-to-Vehicle technology will add about $341 to $350 per vehicle in 2020 and save 1,083 lives a year, according to a new government report released on Monday.
  • V2V technology could eventually prevent up to 592,000 left-turn and intersection crashes a year, said NHTSA.
  • The agency said it will start drafting rules to require the V2V technology in new vehicles.

WASHINGTON — Vehicle-to-Vehicle technology will add about $341 to $350 per vehicle in 2020 and save 1,083 lives a year, according to a new government report released on Monday.

V2V technology could eventually prevent up to 592,000 left-turn and intersection crashes a year, said the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

"V2V technology is ready to move toward implementation," said NHTSA Deputy Administrator David Friedman, in a statement on Monday.

The agency said it will start drafting rules to require the V2V technology in new vehicles. Such technology uses a radio signal to continually transmit information about a vehicle, including speed and position.  

"Safety is our top priority and V2V technology represents the next great advance in saving lives," said U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx in a statement.

The report tackles many of the concerns, ranging from privacy to liability issues, expressed by the public and automakers when it comes to so-called "talking cars."

The report emphasizes that V2V technology "will not collect or store any data identifying individuals or individual vehicles, nor will it enable the government to do so.

"There is no data in the safety messages exchanged by vehicles or collected by the V2V system that could be used by law enforcement or private entities to personally identify a speeding or erratic driver."

NHTSA said that from a product-liability standpoint, it "does not view V2V warning technologies as creating new or unbounded liability exposure for the industry."

Automakers have expressed concerns that V2V technologies will increase their liability compared with other safety technologies because they rely on information received from communications systems they do not control.

One major area of concern is how V2V systems would work with Wi-Fi-enabled devices. NHTSA said more research needs to be done on whether Wi-Fi-enabled devices can "share the spectrum successfully with V2V, and if so, how."

Real-world testing of V2V communications includes a federally funded study by the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute. The Institute is testing the technology in about 3,000 cars on roads around Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Edmunds says: Like it or not, the government is taking the first steps toward a world in which future cars and light trucks will be equipped with technology that enables them to communicate with each other.

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