Rust Belt Innovation Drives Future Auto Colors, Report Says | Edmunds

Rust Belt Innovation Drives Future Auto Colors, Report Says


Just the Facts:
  • Future North American auto colors will reflect Rust Belt innovation, according to the BASF Color Collection 2014/2015 report.
  • Color selections for the 2018 model year will include striking new shades of green, blue, brown, orange and gray.
  • BASF says the colors were chosen to reflect the "unpretentious innovation and sustainable living" of the post-Recession era.

DETROIT — The future North American automotive color palette will be driven by the "unpretentious innovation and sustainable living" of the Rust Belt states, resulting in striking new shades of green, blue, brown, orange and gray.

That's the word from "Under the Radar," the BASF Color Collection 2014/2015 report, which helps car companies predict colors that will become popular several years down the road in various parts of the world.

And, according to the designers at BASF Coatings, we in North America can expect a bit of Midwest influence on automotive color selections for the 2018 model year.

Said Paul Czornij, technical manager for the BASF Color Excellence group, in a statement: "Noting many political, societal and technological references, we realized that the 'flyover states' and the Rust Belt regions are becoming increasingly productive in our post-Recession era."

Accordingly, BASF has suggested five new colors that automakers should consider for the North American market for 2018 model-year vehicles.

Three of them are evocative of the natural world: La Garra Charrua, a light blue "reminiscent of the prairie spaces in middle America"; Fitted Green, "exemplifying the look of fresh mowed grass and a gentle reminder of a simpler, sustainable life"; and Take 10,000, a sparkly brown "that reminds individuals to remember the specialness of natural experiences."

The two remaining colors pay tribute to industry and technology: Haymaker, a rich orange that "sparkles much like the charm of a rusty factory in one of America's Rust Belt cities"; and Gray Elevator, really a dark silver, which "harkens to a connected world where people come together."

"The colors we've chosen will highlight a car?s beauty and create a strong color memory while reflecting both the driver's desires and the North American consciousness," Czornij said.

Globally, according to the report: "The choices of automotive colors will reflect an increased consumer demand for differentiation and individuality. Bright colors as well as warm-influenced colors in new metal effects will enrich the color portfolio of the cars of tomorrow."

These will include elegant dark violets, washed-out blues, understated greens, and warm grays.

Edmunds says: They're still going to make black cars, aren't they?

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