One-Third of Children Killed in Crashes Were Unrestrained, Study Says | Edmunds

One-Third of Children Killed in Crashes Were Unrestrained, Study Says


Just the Facts:
  • One in three children who died in car crashes in 2011 was not buckled up, according to a new study by the Centers for Disease Control.
  • Motor-vehicle deaths among children age 12 and under decreased by 43 percent in the past decade.
  • More than 9,000 children age 12 and under died in crashes in the past decade.

WASHINGTON One in three children who died in car crashes in 2011 was not buckled up, according to a new study by the Centers for Disease Control. The shocking statistic comes at a time when new-car shoppers have a vast array of safety features to choose from, including crash-avoidance technology.

Motor-vehicle deaths among children age 12 and under decreased by 43 percent in the past decade.

More than 9,000 children age 12 and under died in crashes in the past decade.

Motor-vehicle crashes are a leading cause of death for children in the U.S.

"Many of these tragedies are preventable when parents use age- and size-appropriate child restraints every time their child rides in a motor vehicle," said CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., in a statement.

The study found that almost half of all black and Hispanic children who died in crashes were not buckled up, compared to 26 percent of white children.

In January, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration proposed the first side-impact test for car seats sold in the U.S. that are designed for children weighing up to 40 pounds.

Edmunds says: The study is a reminder of the need for children to travel in the backseat in age- and size-appropriate restraints.

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