New Web Site Helps the Timid Warn Friends About Distracted Driving | Edmunds

New Web Site Helps the Timid Warn Friends About Distracted Driving


Just the Facts:
  • The Decide to Drive Web site lets users anonymously warn friends about distracted driving.
  • Users key in an e-mail address, then Decide to Drive sends out its list of "Wreck-Less" safe driving tips.
  • The site also allows users to share distracted-driving stories, participate in contests and events, watch videos and engage in discussions on social media.

ROSEMONT, Illinois — The Decide to Drive Web site allows users to remain anonymous while chastising friends for their distracted-driving habits.

Concerned parties can access the site and key in the e-mail address of an offender. Then Decide to Drive, which is sponsored by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers, will send the person its list of "Wreck-Less" safe driving tips.

These include a number of commonsense admonitions: Put on sunglasses, adjust seats, preload music and enter addresses into the navigation system before the car is in motion; don't apply makeup, change clothes, eat or drink while driving; and, of course, don't text or make phone calls while driving.

In addition to playing safety monitor, the site allows users to share distracted-driving stories, participate in contests and events, contribute to discussions on social media, watch videos and view distracted-driving statistics.

"The new Web site provides visitors with more reasons and reminders to stay focused on the road, and the tools to encourage their friends and family members to do so as well," said AAOS President Frederick M. Azar, M.D., in a statement. "It's a place where the conversation can start, and hopefully will continue in communities throughout the U.S."

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 3,328 people were killed and 421,000 injured in crashes resulting from distracted driving in 2012, the latest year for which statistics are available.

At any given daylight moment, says NHTSA, approximately 660,000 U.S. drivers are using cell phones or manipulating electronic devices while driving.

And, according to Decide to Drive, an AAOS-Harris Interactive survey found that 94 percent of respondents believe that distracted driving is a problem across the U.S., and 89 percent see it as a concern within their own communities.

Edmunds says: If a face-to-face confrontation seems too awkward, here's an alternative.

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