Male Baby Boomers Most Likely To Drive Connected Cars, Study Finds | Edmunds

Male Baby Boomers Most Likely To Drive Connected Cars, Study Finds


Just the Facts:
  • The majority of connected car users are males in the Baby Boomer generation, according to a recent Nielsen study.
  • The study found that 58 percent of connected-cars users are men and 42 percent are over the age of 55.
  • Connectivity is on the rise, with almost every automaker now offering some degree of the technology in its latest models.

NEW YORK — The majority of connected car users are males in the Baby Boomer generation, according to a recent Nielsen study.

Although Nielsen's new Connected Life Report states "the modern car offers some form of connectivity for everyone," the study found that the demographic with the highest interest in the technology isn't younger drivers, as might be expected.

According to Nielsen, the majority (58 percent) of connected-cars users are men, 42 percent are over the age of 55, 62 percent have at least a college degree and 37 percent earn more than $100,000 per year.

Nielsen reached these conclusions after conducting an online survey of almost 6,000 respondents, 18 years of age or older, who use or expressed interest in "connected life technologies," defined as in-car, home or portable devices.

When it comes to vehicle technology, the study found that, of the respondents who plan to purchase a new car within the next two years, 39 percent said they're "very likely" to buy a connected car with built-in features.

Of that group, 79 percent said they'd feel safer with a connected car and ranked safety-related features as most important in their car-buying decision-making process. They checked the "very important" box for crash notification systems (64 percent), Internet-enabled navigation (58 percent) and safety alerts (51 percent).

Other highly rated features include vehicle maintenance and repair diagnostics (51 percent), use of the car as wireless hotspot (47 percent), driving analytics (45 percent), remote-control capability (42 percent) and communication (35 percent).

And while 43 percent hope that connectivity will help boost productivity while they're on the road, fully 60 percent said they plan to purchase a connected car simply to "experience emerging technologies," and 58 percent admit they're most interested in the entertainment features.

It's clear that in-car connectivity is on the rise, with almost every automaker offering some degree of the technology in its latest models.

For example, the all-new 2015 Chrysler 200 is available with the company's latest Uconnect system, a large touchscreen display and hands-free voice control of such features as mobile phone operation, texting, and a variety of ways to access digital music content.

At Ford, enhancements to the Sync 911 Assist system on the 2015 Mustang not only connect vehicle occupants directly to a 911 operator in an emergency, but also transmit critical information to first responders. This includes details like the type of crash, seatbelt usage and airbag deployment.

In addition to updating OnStar with 4G LTE connectivity on such models as the 2015 Buick Encore, General Motors recently announced that the 2017 Cadillac CTS will be enabled with new levels of vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communication technology and the latest high-tech safety equipment.

The redesigned 2015 Honda CR-V is available with the next-generation HondaLink  system, which connects with smartphones and, through a variety of apps, provides control of such functions as satellite-linked navigation, voice communication, text messaging and entertainment functions.

And the redesigned 2015 Toyota Camry is available with the upgraded Entune system, which syncs with mobile phones to facilitate communication, wireless music streaming and advanced satellite navigation, as well as other safety and convenience features, including a stolen-vehicle locator.

Edmunds says: With development rushing ahead at a fast pace, connectivity will very likely feature prominently in your next new car.

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