GM Works To Correct Recall Web Site Flaw | Edmunds

GM Works To Correct Recall Web Site Flaw


Just the Facts:
  • General Motors said it is working to correct a problem with the company's Web site that helps consumers determine if they are driving a car with a defective ignition switch, after federal safety regulators said the site provided "incorrect" information.
  • Some consumers who use the GM VIN look-up site are told their cars aren't part of an active recall, when they are.
  • "We are making the necessary changes to our Web site so customers can identify individual VIN numbers," wrote Alan Adler, a GM spokesman, in response to an Edmunds query on Saturday.

DETROIT — General Motors said it is working to correct a problem with the company's Web site that helps consumers determine if they are driving a car with a defective ignition switch, after federal safety regulators said the site provided "incorrect" information.

Some consumers who use the GM VIN look-up site are told their cars aren't part of an active recall, when they are. VIN stands for vehicle identification number.

"We are making the necessary changes to our Web site so customers can identify individual VIN numbers," wrote Alan Adler, a GM spokesman, in response to an Edmunds query on Saturday. "Until that is complete, if customers have questions about their vehicles, they should call the customer care numbers listed on our Web site."

He said GM is aware of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's inquiry on the VIN look-up issue.

Consumers can reach GM's customer care center at 1-800-222-1020.

NHTSA said it "determined that owners of some recalled GM vehicles are receiving incorrect and misleading results when using the automaker's current VIN look-up system."

GM is in the midst of repairing 2.6 million vehicles with defective ignition switches that have been linked to 13 deaths. They include the 2005-'10 Chevrolet Cobalt.

The automaker had fixed 683,196 of the recalled cars as of July 31.

Starting August 20, NHTSA is requiring all automakers to provide a free online tool that lets car owners search for recalls using the vehicle's VIN.

In the meantime, a victim compensation fund set up by GM to pay for deaths and injuries caused by its vehicles with defective ignition switches is accepting claims.

Consumers can file a claim through December 31. The fund has no cap. The defective vehicles covered by the fund include the 2005-'10 Cobalt and other vehicles, including the 2006-'11 Chevrolet HHR and 2003-'07 Saturn Ion.

Edmunds says: Federal safety regulators say consumers who have used GM's VIN tool and found no recall should recheck now.

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