GM CEO Barra To Testify Before Congress About Handling of Recalls | Edmunds

GM CEO Barra To Testify Before Congress About Handling of Recalls


Just the Facts:
  • GM CEO Mary Barra will testify before a U.S. House committee on April 1 about the automaker's handling of its recall of small cars for a defective ignition switch that led to 31 crashes 12 deaths.
  • David Friedman, the acting administrator of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, has also been invited to testify.
  • "Their testimony is critical to understanding what the company and NHTSA knew about the safety problems, when they knew it and what was done about it," said Energy and Commerce Chairman Fred Upton, R-Mich., in a statement late Thursday.

WASHINGTON — GM CEO Mary Barra will testify before a U.S. House committee on April 1 about the automaker's handling of its recall of small cars for a defective ignition switch that led to 31 crashes and 12 deaths.

David Friedman, the acting administrator of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, has also been invited to testify.

"Their testimony is critical to understanding what the company and NHTSA knew about the safety problems, when they knew it and what was done about it," said Energy and Commerce Chairman Fred Upton, R-Mich., in a statement late Thursday. "The problems originated long before Barra and Friedman took the helms of their respective organizations, but their actions and input now, as our investigation proceeds, will be essential to getting answers about what went wrong.

"We want to know if this tragedy could have been prevented and what can be done to ensure the loss of life due to safety failures like this don't happen again." 

The statement was issued jointly with Oversight and Investigations Subcommittee Chairman Tim Murphy, R-PA.

The recall involves the 2005-'07 Chevrolet Cobalt, 2007 Pontiac G5, 2006-'07 Chevrolet HHR and Pontiac Solstice, 2003-'07 Saturn Ion and 2007 Saturn Sky.

Upton's statement noted: "GM announced a recall in February covering over 1.6 million vehicles worldwide to correct the problems, but reports indicate drivers first complained of the safety defects over 10 years ago."

GM Spokesman James Cain told Edmunds earlier this week that Barra "said she would testify if asked."

Edmunds says: Barra's testimony is considered crucial when it comes to GM's reputation and credibility, especially with consumers.

Leave a Comment
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT