Feds Warn Consumers About Defective Airbags in Over 6 Million Vehicles | Edmunds

Feds Warn Consumers About Defective Airbags in Over 6 Million Vehicles


For more information on the Takata airbag recall, click here. 10/27/14

Just the Facts:
  • The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration warned consumers about defective airbags made by Japanese supplier Takata Corp. in an expanded advisory.
  • "Over six million vehicles are involved in these recalls, which have occurred as far back as 18 months ago and as recently as Monday," NHTSA said.
  • The warning resulted in search-function and outage problems on Safercar.gov. as consumers scrambled to find out if their vehicles are affected.

WASHINGTON The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration warned consumers late Tuesday about defective airbags made by Japanese supplier Takata Corp. in an expanded advisory.

"Over six million vehicles are involved in these recalls, which have occurred as far back as 18 months ago and as recently as Monday," NHTSA said.

The faulty airbags could deploy with too much force, causing metal parts to break and strike occupants.

Federal safety regulators added that as many as 7.8 million U.S. vehicles with Takata airbags could be subject to recalls announced in 2013 and 2014.

"The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration urges owners of certain Toyota, Honda, Mazda, BMW, Nissan, Mitsubishi, Subaru, Chrysler, Ford and General Motors vehicles to act immediately on recall notices to replace defective Takata airbags," NHTSA said.

"The message comes with urgency, especially for owners of vehicles affected by regional recalls in the following areas: Florida, Puerto Rico, limited areas near the Gulf of Mexico in Texas, Alabama, Mississippi, Georgia, and Louisiana, as well as Guam, Saipan, American Samoa, Virgin Islands and Hawaii."

NHTSA corrected and expanded a manufacturer and vehicle list that accompanied an October 20 advisory, saying that advisory "incorrectly included certain vehicles."

"The numbers cited for potentially affected vehicles are subject to change and adjustment because there may be cases of vehicles being counted more than once," it said.

It urged consumers to check their Vehicle Identification Number or VIN periodically "as manufacturers continue to add VINs to the database."

The warning resulted in search-function and outage problems on Safercar.gov. as consumers scrambled to find out if their vehicles are affected.

Consumers are being urged by NHTSA to contact their manufacturer's Web site to search by their VIN to confirm whether their individual vehicle has an open recall that needs to be addressed.

"Owners that have been contacted by their manufacturer should contact their dealer's service department and make arrangement s for the repair," NHTSA said.

Edmunds says: Consumers should heed the warning from federal safety regulators and make a service appointment with their dealer immediately once they receive a vehicle recall notice regarding defective Takata airbags.

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