GM and Toyota Take Major Step Toward Autonomous Driving | Edmunds

GM and Toyota Take Major Step Toward Autonomous Driving


Just the Facts:
  • The 2017 Cadillac CTS and various Toyota and Lexus models will feature vehicle-to-vehicle communication technology, as the two companies move toward becoming industry leaders in autonomous driving.
  • An unnamed 2017 Cadillac vehicle will get "Super Cruise" technology that controls the vehicle's steering, braking and acceleration.
  • GM CEO Mary Barra said Super Cruise and V2V technologies are slated for production in about two years during a speech on Sunday at the Intelligent Transport Systems World Congress in Detroit. Toyota?s V2V system could launch even sooner.

DETROIT — Both General Motors and Toyota are moving rapidly into the word of advanced safety and autonomous driving with plans to begin equipping their vehicles with vehicle-to-vehicle communications systems.

Toyota intends to have so-called V2V system ready by mid-decade spokesman John Hanson told Edmunds.

While he wasn't more specific about timing, Hanson confirmed that the system, when launched, will be added to other advanced safety features that Toyota plans to begin adding to its cars starting in 2015 and to have available throughout its Toyota and Lexus lines by 2017.

GM's plans call for the 2017 Cadillac CTS to feature vehicle-to-vehicle communication technology, as GM moves toward becoming an industry leader in autonomous driving.

Additionally, an unnamed 2017 Cadillac vehicle will get "Super Cruise" technology that controls the vehicle's steering, braking and acceleration.

GM CEO Mary Barra said Super Cruise and V2V technologies are slated for production in about two years during a speech on Sunday at the Intelligent Transport Systems World Congress in Detroit.

"We are taking these giant leaps forward to remain a leader of new technology," Barra said. "We are not doing this for the sake of the technology itself. We're doing it because it's what customers around the world want. Through technology and innovation, we will make driving safer."

She added: "No other suite of technologies offers so much potential for good."

Barra did not say which Cadillac will get the Super Cruise system. But it may be the new rear-wheel-drive flagship sedan that is expected to be based on the Cadillac Elmiraj concept.

The unnamed Cadillac will compete with the Mercedes-Benz S-Class and BMW 7 Series. It is expected to debut at the 2015 Detroit Auto Show.

GM said Super Cruise is "the working name for GM's automated driving technology.

"(It) will offer customers a new type of driving experience that includes hands-off lane following, braking and speed control in certain highway driving conditions," the automaker said in a statement. "The system is designed to increase the comfort of an attentive driver on freeways, both in bumper-to-bumper traffic and on long road trips."

Super Cruise will supplement many active safety features already found on Cadillac vehicles, such as forward collision warning.

Toyota will be offering a similar system, which it calls Advanced Highway Driver Assistance, by "mid-decade" said Bill Fay, vice president of Toyota Motor Sales U.S.A. He said during a safety seminar last week that the company intends to have the system available on its entire lineup by 2017.

Neither Barra nor Hanson said how much their companies plan to charge consumers for the advanced vehicle-to-vehicle communication system and other new safety technology. But the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration said in a recent report that V2V technology will add about $341 to $350 per vehicle in 2020 and save 1,083 lives a year.

While the technology initially will only permit vehicles to communicate with similarly equipped vehicles, it is expected that other automakers will be forced to follow to remain competitive as leaders such as GM and Toyota add it to their cars. As the volume of V2V-equipped cars and trucks increases, "smart infrastructure" such as traffic signals that communicate traffic information to cars on the same short-range radio frequency also will be installed.

The federal agency has said it will start drafting rules to require the V2V technology in new vehicles. The technology uses a radio signal to continually transmit information about a vehicle, including speed and position.

"Commercializing a fully automated vehicle may take until the next decade, but the work we've done so far has given us invaluable insights into things like sensor fusion, which we use today on vehicles like the Cadillac CTS, which has a total of 18 electronic eyes," Barra said in Sunday's speech.

Edmunds says: GM and Toyota take bold steps toward advanced safety and even driverless systems with word that they are well along the road toward deployment of V2V technology.

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