Used 2000 Audi A6 Wagon


2000 Audi A6

2000 Highlights

There are two new models joining the A6 2.8 and A6 2.8 Avant. The first is the A6 2.7T powered by a turbocharged V6 engine. The second model is the A6 4.2 powered by a virile V8.


Pros

  • New selection of engines, well-appointed interior, all-wheel-drive stability.

Cons

  • Non-linear steering, questionable exterior styling, 4.2 model's molded rear seat.

Used 2000 Audi A6 Wagon for Sale

Sorry! There aren't any 2000 Audi A6 for sale near you.

Edmunds' Expert Review

Refined and luxurious, the all-weather A6 family offers a satisfying alternative to the BMW 5 Series or Mercedes E-Class -- the 2.7T is our favorite.

vehicle overview

For 2000, Audi has added two new versions of the A6. Both of them are considerably more powerful than the A6 2.8 Sedan and the A6 2.8 Avant Wagon that were previously offered in America. The A6 2.7T Sedan has a twin-turbo 2.7-liter V6 that produces 250 horsepower and 258 foot-pounds of torque. Audi has used two small turbos rather than one large one to make the engine more responsive. In a nice tip of the hat to enthusiasts, the 2.7T comes with a six-speed manual transmission as standard equipment. A five-speed Tiptronic-controlled automatic transmission is a no-cost option.

The Audi A6 4.2 Sedan features the 4.2-liter V8 normally found in the larger A8 Sedan. Obviously Audi's challenge to the V8-powered BMW 540i and Mercedes-Benz E430, this engine produces 300 horsepower and 295 foot-pounds of torque. This engine comes only with a five-speed Tiptronic-controlled automatic transmission. Beyond the engine, the 4.2 also comes with more aggressive styling, bigger wheels and tires, and more standard equipment.

For 2000, the 2.8 Sedan and 2.8 Avant get an optional five-speed manual transmission. Audi's quattro all-wheel-drive system is optional on the 2.8 Sedan and standard on all of the remaining models. This system constantly monitors the grip of the tires. When one of them starts to lose traction, the quattro system automatically applies power to the tires with the most adhesion to the road surface.

All of the A6 models feature an interior that is one of the best in its class. Audi greets drivers with a generous amount of supple materials and features. As a bonus, A6 buyers can choose from three different types of interiors. The atmospheres -- Ambition, Ambiente and Advance -- differ in their use of texture and appearance of the seat upholstery, and the color and type of genuine wood and aluminum trim.

The A6's styling is unmistakably Audi, with a swept greenhouse and muscular fenders. However, the A6 isn't a stunner like the A4. The rounded sheetmetal and sharply creased trim detail don't blend well to our eye, and the taillights on the sedan appear to have been lifted from Chevrolet's lowly S-10 pickup. From some angles, the car looks great. From others, it appears somewhat dumpy and jumbled. Front overhang can appear especially out of balance. Fortunately, the gracefully swept greenhouse on both the sedan and wagon lends a touch of class and elegance to an otherwise characterless profile.

Despite these nitpicks, we believe the A6 is an enticing choice in the hotly contested entry-level luxury class. If you're looking for a wagon, the A6 Avant should serve nicely. But our personal favorite is the A6 2.7T. This version offers better acceleration than the 2.8 and nearly equals the 4.2. It also doesn't cost much more than the 2.8, and certainly costs less than the 4.2.

Get more for
your trade-in

  • Edmunds shoppers save money with a valuation on their trade-in
  • Receive offers from our dealer partners fast
See Your car's value
Vehicle Photo

Features & Specs

2.8 Avant quattro 4dr Wagon AWD
MPG18
SeatingN/A
Transmission5-speed automatic
Fuelgas
Horsepower200 hp @ 6000 rpm

Safety

IIHS Rating
The Insurance Institute of Highway Safety uses extensive crash tests to determine car safety.
  • Side Impact Test
    Not Tested
  • Roof Strength Test
    Not Tested
  • Rear Crash Protection / Head Restraint
    Not Tested
  • IIHS Small Overlap Front Test
    Not Tested
  • Moderate Overlap Front Test
    A
    Acceptable

Top Consumer Reviews

Read what other owners think about the 2000 Audi A6

(9)

Consumer Rating


Write a consumer review of your vehicle for a chance to WIN $100!
Like a bleached blonde
Flashy and fast. Your friends will envy you. But very expensive to maintain. Great fun to drive. Great performance/handling, great in snow. Comfortable, refined, roomy. Now the bad: poor gas mileage (17 mpg); eats brakes-pads & rotors every 18 month$, control arms bearings replaced twice in 3 years, water pump. Interior trim always falling off. Undercarriage airdam fell off while driving. LED display goes to black. "check engine" light goes on frequently, dealer says "intermittent"-no help. Don't buy one without extended warranty! I bought this used with about 27k on it. Warranty expires at 100k, then I'm done with it. Scratched the Audi itch.
Good all around package
Was looking to buy a Subaru Outback, but when I saw the Audi on a local car lot, I stopped in and gave it a drive. Was impressed by its styling. Very atttractive, but not pretentous. Transmission very smooth, as is engine, which has decent power, and gets good gas mileage for a V-6 AWD, about 25 MPG on highway. Fantastic on slick/wet roads. Nice leather interior that doesn't have any rips or discoloration after 130,000 miles. If you fold the rear seat down, there is a ton of room in the back. Great on long trips. Very reliable except for front driving light bulbs don't last very long. Well built, doesn't have any rattles
Learned my lesson
I was thrilled after a couple of good years to be able to buy my 2000 A6 Avant in CASH in the spring of 2000. The car looked good, handled like a dream, acceleration was OK, and it had a 3 year bumper to bumper warranty. I forked over the $39K and proudly drove my car home. After a week, the dash light up with the check engine light. This was a light that I would become far more acquainted with over the 9 years that I owned the car. The first incident was an O2 sensor. "No problem" I thought, as the dealership assured me that they had a loaner car. Well the loaner turned out to be the mechanic's eight-year-old personal project car - with no radio. There was a gaping hole filled with wires where the radio should have been, but it got me to work for two days while my car was in the shop. Over the 9 years that I owned this thing, six years without warranty, it cost me over $16K in REPAIRS (and I'm not counting oil changes and tires in this figure). That check engine light would come on, and the car would eat another $2-4K in repairs. I had the propellor (drive) shaft replaced twice, the airbag control computer once, brake jobs cost over $1000... it was ridiculous. And ALL of the work had to be done by an authorized Audi dealer. The dealer that I brought the car to also would fix one thing, and break something else. "It was like that when you came in" they would claim. Letters to Audi went unanswered and I got fed up with the whole "Audi Experience." When the car finally clocked 106,000 miles, I sold it in a private sale for $5K and gave the buyer a new set of snow tires, and was happy to see it go. Yes it drove beautifully when it was new, and Quattro is a fantastic all-wheel drive system, but the lack of support from Audi and their crappy dealers made me swear off another Audi. NEVER AGAIN!
More About This Model

There are things that automotive journalists say or write with regular frequency. "Secure handling," is one. "Quick acceleration," is another. So is "supple materials" and "Hey, who took my sandwich?" Or, "Yeah, boss, I'll be out of the office tomorrow evaluating the new Daewoo Nubira." (Flash forward to tomorrow; Hawaiian shirt-clad journalist sits on beach, frosty Coors in hand.)

There is one thing, however, that no journalist has ever said. And that is, "This thing has too much horsepower." I'm dead serious — that phrase has never, ever escaped the mouth of a moto-weenie. The opposite — "This thing could use an extra 50 horsepower" — has been uttered in just about every road test ever written. Ferrari 550 Maranello? More horsepower, please. Dodge Viper? Slap a turbo on that puppy. Caesar's chariot? Another big horse would be nice. Audi A6? Yes please.

Since its introduction in the fall of 1997, the A6 has used a 2.8-liter V6 for motivation. Or, more aptly, unmotivated motivation. A current-generation A6 2.8 Quattro, equipped with a five-speed automatic, will run from zero to 60 in approximately 9.2 seconds. For perspective, a current Accord V6 will do the same feat in less than 8 seconds and a Jeep Grand Cherokee V8 in about 7.3 seconds. Thoroughly beaten by a plebian Honda and a truck? A Teutonic injustice, to be sure.

So here we are in 2000 and the folks at Audi have made some big changes to restore the proper world order. There are two new models complementing the existing A6 2.8 and A6 2.8 Avant. The first is the A6 2.7T with a 250-horsepower, twin-turbo V6 engine. The second is the A6 4.2 with a 300-horsepower V8. Are the horsepower increases enough to satisfy even the most velocity-addicted auto journalist? Of course not. But they are considerable improvements, and a potential buyer of a luxury sedan should take serious note.

First the A6 2.7T. Its engine is new to North American shores. Displacing 2.7 liters, this V6 is a modified version of the 2.8-liter V6 found in the A6 2.8. The 2.7T engine is fitted with two small turbos and twin intercoolers. The small size of the turbos facilitates a quicker turbo boost response. This is evident in the torque curve — the maximum output of 258 foot-pounds is available at a super-low 1,850 rpm.

This twin-turbo engine is connected to either a six-speed manual or five-speed Tiptronic automanual transmission. The six-speed is standard and the automanual is a no-cost option. Both are connected to Audi's quattro all-wheel-drive system. In the six-speed equipped A6 2.7T that we drove briefly, acceleration was quick. Speedy, even. Not your typical A6 at all. We didn't have access to testing equipment, but Audi claims the manual version burns a zero-to-60 time of 6 seconds flat. With the automatic, Audi says 6.6 seconds. Even if these numbers are optimistic, they still indicate that there's now an A6 version that can actually get you speeding tickets.

If for some reason 250 horsepower isn't enough, there's the A6 4.2. Here you have the modern version of a hot rodder's engine swap. Audi has taken the 4.2-liter V8 out of its flagship A8 Sedan and plopped it into the smaller A6. The engine is loaded with all sorts of high-tech goodies like five valves per cylinder, dual-overhead cams, variable valve timing for the intake camshaft, and a three-stage intake manifold made of magnesium. These goodies result in 300 horsepower at 6,200 rpm and 295 foot-pounds of torque at 3,000 rpm. A five-speed Tiptronic automanual is standard, as is the quattro system.

Compared to the manual transmission 2.7T, the 4.2 accelerates in a much more regal fashion. The V8 engine is very quiet and states its presence only in the higher revs. But it ultimately doesn't seem to be in as much of a hurry as the V6 turbo. In fact, Audi lists a zero-to-60 time of 6.7 seconds for the 4.2. While this is certainly quick enough to embarrass many a performance coupe, it can't match the time posted by the 2.7T with the manual transmission. Even more interesting, Audi lists a time of 6.6 seconds for the 2.7T automatic. So yes, that means that despite a 50-horsepower advantage, the 4.2 is slightly slower than the 2.7T automatic. Our best guess on the culprit: the extra weight (the 4.2 weighs 288 pounds more) and taller transmission gearing.

But don't quite dismiss the 4.2 yet. Besides the V8 engine, the 4.2 also contains a number of features and abilities not found on any other A6. To spot a 4.2, look for the flared fenders, unique wheels, and widened side skirts. And though you probably won't notice it, the hood and fenders are slightly longer to accommodate the V8. The final effect is understated, but the 4.2 is definitely the most aggressive looking of the A6 bunch.

Those flared fenders house widened tracks at the front and rear, as well as bigger 235/60R16s tires (205/55R16s on an A6 2.8). Audi also offers a set of optional 255/40R17 tires. Because of the widened tracks and bigger tires, the 4.2 seemed to be the most stable A6 during our short test drives. This secure all-wheel-drive handling, combined with the taller transmission gearing, smooth V8, and bigger fuel tank, make the 4.2 a sweet high-speed freeway runner.

Both the 2.7T and the 4.2 use the same interior design found in the 2.8. This is one of the top interiors found in the luxury-sedan market. Audi gives drivers a generous amount of supple materials and features. Audi A6 2.7T and 4.2 buyers can order a distinct interior atmosphere. Audi currently offers three at no cost: Ambition, Ambiente and Advance. The 2.7T can be ordered with any of the three, while the 4.2 gets either Ambition or Ambiente. The different atmospheres are distinguished by the texture and appearance of the seat upholstery, and the color and type of genuine wood and aluminum trim. Each atmosphere is available in at least two color choices and can be specified in leatherette, leather or, in the advance atmosphere, a Jacquard cloth.

To further the 4.2's value, Audi has given it a contoured rear seat, standard head and side airbags, leather seat upholstery, a sunroof, three memory positions for the driver's seat, a Bose audio system, and steering wheel-mounted audio controls. The exact purpose of the 4.2's contoured rear seat eludes us. While it adds lateral support for two passengers, it also effectively eliminates a comfortable seating position for the third passenger in the middle (there are still three seatbelts for the rear). Other notable options on both the 4.2 and 2.7T include high-intensity discharge xenon headlights, a navigation system, and rear side airbags.

The 2.7T and the 4.2 Sedans are a major improvement to the A6 lineup. Audi's recent emphasis on technology, design, performance, and emotion is evident. For pricing, the 2.7T starts at $38,500 and the 4.2 starts at $48,900. Compared to the BMW 5 Series and the Mercedes-Benz E-Class, both of the new A6s are relative bargains. They are also much more appealing than the A6 2.8. From the Edmunds.com point of view, the best buy here is the 2.7T. While we applaud Audi for going to the lengths that it did in creating the 4.2, its only truly unique feature is the engine. The 2.7T costs about $10,000 less than the 4.2 and offers near-equal or better performance. And if buyers like the extra equipment found on the 4.2, they can still get almost all of it as optional equipment on the 2.7T. Now, where's my sandwich?

Used 2000 Audi A6 Wagon Overview

The Used 2000 Audi A6 Wagon is offered in the following styles: , and 2.8 Avant quattro 4dr Wagon AWD.

What's a good price on a Used 2000 Audi A6 Wagon?

Shop with Edmunds for perks and special offers on used cars, trucks, and SUVs near Ashburn, VA. Doing so could save you hundreds or thousands of dollars. Edmunds also provides consumer-driven dealership sales and service reviews to help you make informed decisions about what cars to buy and where to buy them.

Which used 2000 Audi A6 Wagons are available in my area?

Used 2000 Audi A6 Wagon Listings and Inventory

Simply research the type of used car you're interested in and then select a prew-owned vehicle from our massive database to find cheap used cars for sale near you. Once you have identified a used or CPO vehicle you're interested in, check the Carfax and Autocheck vehicle history reports, read dealer reviews, and find out what other owners paid for the Used 2000 Audi A6 Wagon.

Shop Edmunds' car, SUV, and truck listings of over 6 million vehicles to find a cheap used, or certified pre-owned (CPO) 2000 Audi A6 Wagon for sale near you.