Used 1998 Acura Integra Type R Review




what's new

A revised front end, designed for a more aerodynamic approach, is added this year. LS, GS and GS-R models get a little more comfortable with a tilt- and height-adjustable driver seat and new alloy wheels appear on the LS and GS-R. The performance-edition Type-R is available again this year.

vehicle overview

Honda enjoys the distinction of landing luxury cars in the United States before any other Japanese automaker had even considered the idea. The Legend sedan, marketed under the Acura nameplate, was an interesting choice over domestic luxury sedans, and was an inexpensive and reliable alternative to European luxury marques. However, Honda couldn't expect to sell enough Legends to keep its new Acura franchise afloat, so engineers spruced up the Honda Civic platform and introduced the nimble Integra to complement the bigger sedan in showrooms.

Since 1986, when the Integra debuted, it has garnered praise from a variety of automotive and consumer groups. Integras have always been sporty, practical, fun-to-drive and reliable. Needless to say, they are popular cars with a wide demographic group. The current iteration, which is the third generation of the Integra, is no exception to this rule.

These sport coupes and sedans are quick and comfortable, with excellent build quality. Since 1994, they've sported swoopy, modern styling, featuring quad, circular headlamps. For 1998, the Integra sports combination lamps and lenses, front and rear, which is said to help reduce the drag coefficient. Unfortunately, the front fascia design is marred by a thick, black rubber molding between the edge of the hood and the fascia, and this cutline is painfully obvious on lighter-colored cars.

The Type R was added to Integra's stable late in the summer of 1997, and it may be the standard by which all Japanese sport coupes are measured. Offering 195 horsepower at 8000 rpm, hand-polished intake and exhaust ports and a high-flow exhaust system all make for a fire-breathing engine. Did we mention the 8500-rpm redline? Type "R" is for rrrrrev. Combined with that engine is a car that loses 93 pounds of weight, so stand by for takeoff.

With Acura's legendary reliability, we recommend the Integra, particularly for those on a budget or in need of a set of sporty wheels. Starting at just over $16,000, the Integra offers cheap thrills and low repair bills.

edmunds expert review process

This review was written by a member of Edmunds' editorial team of expert car reviewers. Our team drives every car you can buy. We put the vehicles through rigorous testing, evaluating how they drive and comparing them in detail to their competitors.

We're also regular people like you, so we pay attention to all the different ways people use their cars every day. We want to know if there's enough room for our families and our weekend gear and whether or not our favorite drink fits in the cupholder. Our editors want to help you make the best decision on a car that fits your life.