2010 Honda Accord Crosstour vs. 2009 Toyota Venza Comparison Test

2009 Toyota Venza Wagon

(3.5L V6 AWD 6-speed Automatic)
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1 Video , 51 Photos

  • Comparison Test
  • Second Opinion
  • Top 5 Features
  • Data and Charts
  • Editors' Evaluations
  • Final Rankings and Scoring Explanation
  • 2009 Toyota Venza Specs and Performance
  • 2010 Honda Accord Crosstour Specs and Performance

You don't choose cars like these, you succumb to them. They creep up on you like thin hair and thick ankles. One minute you're rolling a 3 Series coupe, the next minute your wife needs room to haul her gardening stuff and the kids want rear doors and a DVD player.

It's about that time when wagon-style things like the 2010 Honda Accord Crosstour and 2009 Toyota Venza start to look attractive. OK, plausible maybe.

With extra cargo room and a more comforting view of the road, these tall wagons are sort of like SUVs, only without the guilt of a gas-sucking V8 under the hood. You won't find any big, heavy truck parts underneath their skins either.

Granted, neither the Honda nor the Toyota is going to do much for your image. In fact, you can pretty much kiss good-bye whatever sliver of cool you still had left. There are no wheels tall enough nor tires wide enough to make either of these vehicles look tough. These are wagons, and it's what's inside that counts. Don't worry, though. Your friends may wince, but your family will love you.

The Station Wagon Is Back
Honda and Toyota have done their best to position these vehicles as something entirely new, crossovers that defy categorization — segment-busters, if you will. But once you cut beneath the marketingspeak, the Crosstour and the Venza are essentially Accord and Camry wagons.

There should be no shame in such vehicles, and both the 2010 Honda Accord Crosstour and the 2009 Toyota Venza have the mainstream persona adopted over the years by the Accord and Camry. When you compare them with sedans, there are a few notable differences like the higher ride height and optional all-wheel-drive systems. And for better or worse, both feature unique styling. Some of this is helpful. The fact that both vehicles are treated as premium versions of their respective sedans is slightly less so.

Yes, you must pay up for the privilege of piloting these suburban carry-alls. The cheapest Honda Accord Crosstour starts at just under $30K for a front-wheel-drive model with a V6. The Venza offers a base model with an inline-4, but even that starts at $26K. Get loaded-up versions as we did and you're looking at $37,000 for the Honda and just over $39,000 for the Toyota.

Did you think the latest in car-based family transportation was going to be cheaper than some primitive pickup-based SUV? No chance, but at these prices these crossovers do include numerous family-friendly gadgets, like navigation systems, high-end stereos, heated leather seats, plus the requisite back-up camera so you don't run over the dog.

Big Backyards
The whole point of these vehicles is the extra cargo room out back, so here's what you can expect. The Toyota Venza's cargo bay is wide and shallow. The Crosstour's space is narrow and deep. In technical terms this translates to 30.7 cubic feet of room behind the Venza's rear seats and 25.7 cubic feet in the Crosstour.

For further comparison, consider the fact that the Accord and Camry sedans offer roughly 14 cubic feet of space in their trunks. It's also worth noting that the hatchback configurations of the Crosstour and Venza make for much larger openings so there's less wedging and angling required in order to pack stuff in.

In the 2010 Honda Accord Crosstour, we found that a large suitcase and a stroller fit a little tight, while the Venza had room to spare with the same load. Possibly more important is the fact that the Venza offers an optional power-operated hatch and the Crosstour doesn't. On the flip side, there are several under-floor storage bins in the Honda and none in the Toyota.

If maximum capacity is a priority, the 2009 Toyota Venza wins with a total of 70 cubic feet of space compared to the Crosstour's 50.1 cubic feet. Both vehicles have 60/40-split second-row seats and both provide levers in the cargo area to fold them flat while you're loading up.

Again, the Honda's shorter, narrower space presents more of a challenge for odd-shaped cargo like a mountain bike, although one will fit even if one section of the second-row seat is in place. In the Venza, a bike fits more easily and your kid won't be eating the tire while he's sitting in the second row.

Two Sides of the Same Coin
Aside from their sizable backsides, the Crosstour and the Venza look and feel a lot like Accord and Camry sedans. Other than its slightly higher seating position, the Crosstour feels almost identical to the Accord from behind the wheel. That's probably because the cabin is, in fact, identical to that of the Accord sedan.

This is not altogether a bad thing. It means the 2010 Honda Accord Crosstour has an easy-to-read instrument cluster, high-quality interior materials and good visibility for driving. Build quality is solid, too. Other than the overcrowded mess of buttons in the middle of the dashboard, the Crosstour is a high-quality piece for a family car.

Toyota took a slightly different tack with the Venza. This Toyota crossover gets a unique interior layout compared to the Camry. There's a high-mounted shift lever on the elevated center console and a simplified climate control layout. It's all connected to a reconfigurable center console between the front seats that includes cupholders, iPod connections and extra storage room.

On the whole, though, the 2009 Toyota Venza's interior often misses the mark. The shift lever is indeed handy and the center console useful, but the rest of the cabin is too low-budget given the Venza's price. The climate controls feel frail, the wood trim isn't convincing and the texture of the steering wheel cover and dashboard is oddly rough and cheap-looking.

We also noticed that our particular Venza showed numerous signs of poor construction. Several panels on the dashboard were misaligned, while others appeared to be peeling back — not what you would expect from a company that built its reputation on quality control.

They Drive Like Sedans
To expect anything more than a sedate driving experience from either of these wagons is asking too much. They are five-passenger cocoons. You don't really drive them; you just sort of ride along.

That said, both vehicles have well-sorted suspensions and plenty of power. The Venza's V6 sends 268 horsepower through a six-speed automatic transmission, while the Crosstour uses five gears to distribute its 271 hp.

The extra gear helps the Venza quite a bit, as it hits 60 mph from a stop nearly a second quicker than the Crosstour (6.9 seconds versus 7.8 seconds), despite weighing 73 pounds more than the Honda (4,108 pounds versus 4,035 pounds).

Our seat-of-the-pants impression suggests it's not simply the Toyota's gearing that makes the difference between these two crossovers, because the Venza's transmission also shifts more deliberately and has much quicker reactions during normal driving. Stomp the throttle in the Honda and the gearbox thinks about it first before shelling out the horsepower.

It's a similar situation when it comes to handling. The 20-inch wheels and more aggressive Goodyear Eagle RS-A tires that come standard on the higher-trim Venza deliver better grip and sharper turn-in. Through the slalom they give the Toyota an advantage of about 1 mph over the Honda. Even during normal driving, the 2009 Toyota Venza feels lighter and more nimble than the 2010 Honda Accord Crosstour. If it weren't for the overboosted steering, the Venza might actually be interesting to drive instead of merely pleasant.

With its smaller, less aggressive tires and softer suspension setup, the Crosstour rides more comfortably over rough surfaces. Its steering isn't much better than the Venza's, though. It always feels like it wants to spring back to center and there's minimal road feel. There's very little harshness either, though, and the cabin is generally quieter than the Venza's, so it coddles a bit more than the Toyota.

Safety First
If you're going to bite the bullet and go all in for the family, you might as well get a vehicle that includes more safety and functionality than you'll ever need. The safety part is easy in this case, as both vehicles feature multiple airbags and electronic stability control systems for protection before and during an accident.

Naturally, four-wheel antilock brakes are standard across the board and both vehicles returned similar distances in our 60-0-mph testing (129 feet for the Honda and 128 feet for the Toyota). Pedal feel is slightly better in the Venza, as the action is light and easy to modulate.

Both vehicles feature optional all-wheel-drive systems, which also add a measure of safety in poor weather. You never really know that they're even along for the ride until you encounter a loss of traction at the front wheels, which sends power immediately to the rear wheels to help out.

On rain-soaked roads we could feel the systems work only with full-throttle starts from a stop. Snow would obviously be a different story, but even front-wheel-drive versions come with standard traction control. There's a penalty for the added weight of the AWD system, though. The Venza's EPA mileage numbers drop by 1 mpg with AWD, while the Crosstour drops 2 mpg on the highway and 1 mpg in the city.

The Better of Two Good Choices
The 2009 Toyota Venza has an advantage here when it comes to day-to-day functionality because its backseats are more spacious and a DVD player is optional. The Toyota's optional keyless ignition system is another feature that's useful, and it's not available in the Honda.

As slick as the 2010 Honda Accord Crosstour is inside its cabin, after a week behind the wheel of both we gave the edge to the Venza. Yes, the Toyota's build quality is disappointing, but everything else about it is perfect for the segment. You can argue about the styling all you want, but the Venza delivers a better combination of passenger space, cargo capacity and feature content.

It's also faster down a freeway on-ramp and slightly easier on the wallet at the pump. Not exactly the stuff of automotive legend, but once you take the plunge, you'll realize the compromise is worth it. Just ask the family riding with you.

The manufacturers provided Edmunds these vehicles for the purposes of evaluation.

Senior Road Test Editor Josh Jacquot says:
It's hard to be passionate about mommy-mobiles like these. They aren't really cars and they aren't really SUVs and they aren't really minivans (which I'm not ashamed to admit I love). Instead, these bizarre wagons land somewhere in the lukewarm middle ground, which I find largely unappealing for its lack of commitment.

So here's the Cliff's Notes version of what I like and why:

If it's a contest of powertrain and handling, the Toyota Venza wins this comparison. Its powertrain is superior by virtue of actually motivating the car more quickly (despite a lower power rating), being more responsive and offering some control over its transmission via a manual shift gate. Handling, too, is sharper in the Venza thanks to more roll stiffness and bigger wheels and tires.

The downside to this, of course, is that the big Toyota doesn't ride as well as the Honda, which is as smooth and comfortable as every mommy will want. The Crosstour is also nicer inside than the Venza. The details are done very well inside the Crosstour and it shows. There's a creativity in the Honda's interior design and packaging that makes it more usable than the Toyota. It's also filled with nicer materials that are screwed together with more precision. But, goodness, is the thing ever ugly.

Do the math on this equation and I'm utterly indifferent. Both cars meet their target without any egregious missteps. Both cars will serve you well. And both cars are passionless family haulers. If that's what you want, either one will work perfectly.

When it comes to features, we considered convenience features a priority, reflecting the people moving for which these vehicles are intended. Keep in mind that anything that's standard on both vehicles isn't eligible. Obviously, options like an iPod connection and keyless ignition are worthwhile features, but we consider equipment like a limited-slip differential to be a little more essential. Each car received points based on whether our chosen features were standard or optional, and no points if it wasn't available at all.

Features
  2010 Honda Accord Crosstour 2009 Toyota Venza
Keyless entry/ignition N/A O
Navigation S O
Power-operated rear hatch N/A O
Rear back-up camera S O
Rear-seat DVD system N/A O

Key:
S: Standard
O: Optional
N/A: Not Available

Power-operated rear hatch: This is one of those features that has finally trickled down from luxury vehicles. Press a button on the key fob and the hatch automatically opens and closes. That's pretty handy when your arms are full of stuff that you plan to put into the cargo area. It comes as part of the Premium package on the Venza, but is not available on the Crosstour.

Keyless entry/ignition: Another useful feature to have when your arms are full. Just pull the door handle with the key in your pocket and it unlocks. Get in and push the button on the dash and it starts. Simple. It's part of the Premium package on the Venza and not available on the Crosstour.

Rear back-up camera: Mirrors are great, but a wide-angle view of what's behind you on the dashboard screen is even better. It comes standard on the Crosstour with Navigation and is part of the Premium package on the Venza.

Rear-seat DVD system: Some say these things are making kids unappreciative of the joys of driving. Others say that people who suggest such a thing don't have kids. Either way, it's a handy option if you're going on a long trip. It's optional on the Venza and not available on the Honda.

Navigation: This has become a must-have feature for any family vehicle and we can see why. It's comforting to know you'll always have a map handy when you need it, and the additional features like restaurant and hotel listings make it that much more useful. Naturally, it's standard on the Crosstour with navigation, and the Venza offers it as an option.

Dimensions
Engine & Transmission Specifications
Warranty Information
Performance Information


Dimensions
Exterior Dimensions & Capacities
  2010 Honda Accord Crosstour 2009 Toyota Venza
Length, in. 196.8 189.0
Width, in. 74.7 75.0
Height, in. 65.7 63.4
Wheelbase, in. 110.1 109.3
As Tested Curb Weight, lb. 4,035 4,108
Turning Circle, ft. 40.2 39.1


Interior Dimensions
  2010 Honda Accord Crosstour 2009 Toyota Venza
Front headroom, in. 39.5 39.6
Rear headroom, in. 37.5 39.3
Front shoulder room, in. 57.8 60.0
Rear shoulder room, in. 56.2 59.0
Front legroom, in. 42.2 40.2
Rear legroom, in. 37.0 39.1
Cargo volume, cu-ft. 25.7 30.7
Max cargo volume, cu-ft. 51.0 70.0


Engine & Transmission Specifications
Engine & Transmission
  2010 Honda Accord Crosstour 2009 Toyota Venza
Displacement
(cc / cu-in):
3500 (214) 3500 (214)
Engine Type V6 V6
Horsepower (SAE) @ rpm 271 @ 6,200 268 @ 6,200
Max. Torque, lb-ft @ rpm 254 @ 5,000 246 @ 4,700
Transmission 5-speed automatic 6-speed automatic
EPA Fuel Economy City, mpg 17.0 18.0
EPA Fuel Economy Hwy, mpg 25.0 25.0
Observed Fuel Economy combined, mpg N/A N/A


Warranty
Warranty Information
  2010 Honda Accord Crosstour 2009 Toyota Venza
Basic Warranty 3 years/36,000 miles 3 years/36,000 miles
Powertrain 5 years/60,000 miles 5 years/60,000 miles
Roadside Assistance N/A N/A
Corrosion Protection 5 years/Unlimited 5 years/Unlimited


Performance
Performance Information
  2010 Honda Accord Crosstour 2009 Toyota Venza
0-60 mph acceleration, sec. 7.8 6.9
Quarter-mile acceleration, sec. 15.7 15.0
Quarter-mile speed, mph 90.1 93.0
60-0-mph braking, feet 129 128
Lateral Acceleration, g 0.77 0.77
600-ft slalom, mph 63.4 64.3

Evaluation - Drive
Evaluation - Ride
Evaluation - Design
Evaluation - Function

Evaluation - Drive

Overall Dynamics
Vehicle Score Rank
2010 Honda Accord Crosstour 6.3 2
2009 Toyota Venza 7.1 1

Engine Performance
Vehicle Score Rank
2010 Honda Accord Crosstour 6.0 2
2009 Toyota Venza 8.0 1

Transmission Performance
Vehicle Score Rank
2010 Honda Accord Crosstour 6.0 2
2009 Toyota Venza 8.0 1

Brake Performance
Vehicle Score Rank
2010 Honda Accord Crosstour 6.0 2
2009 Toyota Venza 7.3 1

Steering Performance
Vehicle Score Rank
2010 Honda Accord Crosstour 7.0 1
2009 Toyota Venza 5.5 2

Handling
Vehicle Score Rank
2010 Honda Accord Crosstour 6.5 2
2009 Toyota Venza 7.3 1

Fun to Drive
Vehicle Score Rank
2010 Honda Accord Crosstour 6.0 2
2009 Toyota Venza 6.5 1

Evaluation - Ride

Overall Comfort
Vehicle Score Rank
2010 Honda Accord Crosstour 7.3 1
2009 Toyota Venza 6.8 2

Ride Comfort
Vehicle Score Rank
2010 Honda Accord Crosstour 8.0 1
2009 Toyota Venza 7.0 2

Wind Noise
Vehicle Score Rank
2010 Honda Accord Crosstour 7.0 1
2009 Toyota Venza 7.0 1

Road Noise
Vehicle Score Rank
2010 Honda Accord Crosstour 7.5 1
2009 Toyota Venza 7.0 2

Front Seat Comfort/Space/Access
Vehicle Score Rank
2010 Honda Accord Crosstour 7.0 1
2009 Toyota Venza 6.5 2

Rear Seat Comfort/Space/Access
Vehicle Score Rank
2010 Honda Accord Crosstour 7.0 1
2009 Toyota Venza 7.0 1

Driving Position
Vehicle Score Rank
2010 Honda Accord Crosstour 7.0 1
2009 Toyota Venza 6.5 2

Evaluation - Design

Overall Design & Build Quality
Vehicle Score Rank
2010 Honda Accord Crosstour 7.3 1
2009 Toyota Venza 6.1 2

Exterior Design
Vehicle Score Rank
2010 Honda Accord Crosstour 5.5 2
2009 Toyota Venza 7.0 1

Interior Design
Vehicle Score Rank
2010 Honda Accord Crosstour 7.8 1
2009 Toyota Venza 6.5 2

Interior Materials
Vehicle Score Rank
2010 Honda Accord Crosstour 7.8 1
2009 Toyota Venza 6.0 2

Interior Control Tactile Feel
Vehicle Score Rank
2010 Honda Accord Crosstour 7.8 1
2009 Toyota Venza 5.5 2

Squeaks & Rattles
Vehicle Score Rank
2010 Honda Accord Crosstour 7.0 1
2009 Toyota Venza 7.0 1

Panel Fitment & Gaps
Vehicle Score Rank
2010 Honda Accord Crosstour 8.0 1
2009 Toyota Venza 4.5 2


Evaluation - Function

Overall Function
Vehicle Score Rank
2010 Honda Accord Crosstour 6.9 2
2009 Toyota Venza 7.2 1

Headlamp Illumination
Vehicle Score Rank
2010 Honda Accord Crosstour 6.0 2
2009 Toyota Venza 7.0 1

Visibility
Vehicle Score Rank
2010 Honda Accord Crosstour 6.3 2
2009 Toyota Venza 7.5 1

Instrument Panel (IP) Layout
Vehicle Score Rank
2010 Honda Accord Crosstour 7.8 1
2009 Toyota Venza 6.5 2

Climate Control Layout
Vehicle Score Rank
2010 Honda Accord Crosstour 6.5 2
2009 Toyota Venza 7.5 1

Audio System Layout
Vehicle Score Rank
2010 Honda Accord Crosstour 6.0 2
2009 Toyota Venza 7.0 1

Secondary Control Layout
Vehicle Score Rank
2010 Honda Accord Crosstour 6.5 2
2009 Toyota Venza 7.0 1

Interior Storage
Vehicle Score Rank
2010 Honda Accord Crosstour 7.0 1
2009 Toyota Venza 7.0 1

Cupholders
Vehicle Score Rank
2010 Honda Accord Crosstour 7.5 1
2009 Toyota Venza 7.5 1

Standard Cargo / Trunk Space
Vehicle Score Rank
2010 Honda Accord Crosstour 8.0 1
2009 Toyota Venza 7.0 2

Maximum Cargo Space
Vehicle Score Rank
2010 Honda Accord Crosstour 7.0 2
2009 Toyota Venza 8.0 1

Final Rankings
Item Weight 2009 Toyota Venza 2010 Honda Accord Crosstour
Personal Rating 2.5% 75.0 75.0
Recommended Rating 2.5% 50.0 100.0
Evaluation Score 20% 68.0 69.1
Feature Content 20% 66.7 40.0
Performance 20% 100.0 85.3
Fuel Consumption 15% 100.0 97.3
Price 20% 93.9 100.0
Total Score 100.0% 83.8 77.9
Final Ranking 1 2

Personal Rating (2.5%): Purely subjective. After the test, each participating editor was asked to rank the vehicles in order of preference based on which he or she would buy if money were no object.

Recommended Rating (2.5%): After the test, each participating editor was asked to rank the vehicles in order of preference based on which he or she thought would be best for the average consumer shopping in this segment.

28-Point Evaluation (20%): Each participating editor ranked each vehicle based on a comprehensive 28-point evaluation. The evaluation covered everything from exterior design to cupholders. Scoring was calculated on a point system, and the scores listed are averages based on all test participants' evaluations.

Feature Content (20%): For this category, the editors picked the top five features they thought would be most beneficial to the consumer shopping in this segment. For each vehicle, the score was based on the number of actual features it had versus the total possible. Standard and optional equipment were taken into consideration.

Performance Testing (20%): Both cars were put through a comprehensive battery of instrumented tests, including 0-60-mph acceleration, quarter-mile runs and panic stops from 60 mph. They were also run through a 600-foot slalom course to test transitional handling, and around a skid pad to determine ultimate grip. Each car was awarded points based on how close it came to the better-performing car's score in each category.

Fuel Consumption (15%): The scores listed are the result of a simple percentage calculation based on the car with the highest EPA combined fuel economy rating. The Toyota had a slight edge in this regard thanks to ratings of 18 city and 25 highway versus the Honda's ratings of 17 city and 25 highway.

Price (20%): The numbers listed were the result of a simple percentage calculation based on the less-expensive vehicle in the comparison test. Using the "as tested" prices of the actual evaluation vehicles, the less expensive vehicle received a score of 100, with the remaining vehicle receiving a lesser score based on how much each one costs.

Vehicle
Model year2009
MakeToyota
ModelVenza
Style4dr Wagon AWD (3.5L 6cyl 6A)
Base MSRP$30,300
Options on test vehicle50-State Emissions, Navigation System, Rear-Seat Entertainment, Premium Package #2, Tow Prep Package, Floor Mats, Rear Bumper Protector
As-tested MSRP$39,189
Drivetrain
Drive typeAll-wheel drive
Engine typeV6
Displacement (cc/cu-in)3,456cc (211 cu-in)
Block/head materialAluminum
ValvetrainDouble overhead camshaft
Compression ratio (x:1)10.8
Redline (rpm)6,400
Horsepower (hp @ rpm)268 @ 6,200
Torque (lb-ft @ rpm)246 @ 4,700
Transmission typeSix-speed automatic
Transmission and axle ratios (x:1)1-3.33; 2-1:90;3-1.42;4-1.00;5-.713;6- .608
Chassis
Suspension, frontMacPherson strut
Suspension, rearMultilink
Steering typeElectric power steering
Steering ratio (x:1)17:01
Tire brandGoodyear
Tire modelEagle RS-A
Tire typeAll-season
Tire size, frontP245/50R20 H
Tire size, rearP245/50R20 H
Wheel size20-by-7.5 inches front and rear
Wheel materialAlloy
Brakes, frontVentilated disc
Brakes, rearDisc
Track Test Results
0-45 mph (sec.)4.6
0-60 mph (sec.)6.9
0-75 mph (sec.)10.0
1/4-mile (sec. @ mph)15.0 @ 93.0
0-60 with 1 foot of rollout (sec.)6.6
Braking, 30-0 mph (ft.)32
60-0 mph (ft.)128
Slalom, 6 x 100 ft. (mph)64.3
Skid pad, 200-ft. diameter (lateral g)0.77
Sound level @ idle (dB)38.7
@ Full throttle (dB)66.9
@ 70 mph cruise (dB)59.0
Test Driver Ratings & Comments
Acceleration commentsImpressive out-of-the-hole stomp. Spins the tires and then hooks up and hauls the mail. Likes a little brake torque off the line. Manual shifting doesn't improve the times at all.
Braking ratingAverage
Braking commentsConsistent pedal during this test and when slowing down during accel runs. Best distance on last stop.
Handling ratingAverage
Handling comments(Skid pad) Reasonable body control and confident grip, but highly managed by the electronics, which keeps limits artificially low. Moderate understeer, not responsive to lift throttle. (Slalom) Far more capability in the chassis, but stability control system makes it hard to pull a good number. ESC is never completely off, but it does allow some additional leeway with it off. Goes where you point it, but only after heavy intervention and slowing.
Testing Conditions
Elevation (ft.)1,121
Temperature (F)62.06
Wind (mph, direction)0.8
Fuel Consumption
EPA fuel economy (mpg)18 city/25 highway
Edmunds observed (mpg)N/A
Fuel tank capacity (U.S. gal.)17.7
Dimensions & Capacities
Curb weight, mfr. claim (lbs.)4,045
Curb weight, as tested (lbs.)4,108
Weight distribution, as tested, f/r (%)57.4/42.6
Length (in.)189.0
Width (in.)75.0
Height (in.)63.4
Wheelbase (in.)109.3
Track, front (in.)64.2
Track, rear (in.)64.2
Turning circle (ft.)39.1
Legroom, front (in.)40.2
Legroom, rear (in.)39.1
Headroom, front (in.)39.6
Headroom, rear (in.)39.3
Shoulder room, front (in.)60.0
Shoulder room, rear (in.)59.0
Seating capacity5
Cargo volume (cu-ft)30.7
Max. cargo volume, seats folded (cu-ft)70.1
Warranty
Bumper-to-bumper3 years/36,000 miles
Powertrain5 years/60,000 miles
Corrosion5 years/Unlimited miles
Free scheduled maintenanceNot available
Safety
Front airbagsStandard
Side airbagsStandard dual front
Head airbagsStandard front and rear
Knee airbagsDriver only
Antilock brakesFour-wheel ABS
Electronic brake enhancementsBraking assist, electronic brakeforce distribution
Traction controlStandard
Stability controlStandard
Rollover protectionStandard
Tire-pressure monitoring systemTire-pressure monitoring
Emergency assistance systemNot available
NHTSA crash test, driver5 stars
NHTSA crash test, passenger5 stars
NHTSA crash test, side front5 stars
NHTSA crash test, side rear5 stars
NHTSA rollover resistance4 stars
Vehicle
Model year2010
MakeHonda
ModelAccord Crosstour
StyleEX-L 4dr Hatchback AWD with Navigation (3.5L 6cyl 5A)
Base MSRP$36,930
As-tested MSRP$36,930
Drivetrain
Drive typeAll-wheel drive
Engine typeV6
Displacement (cc/cu-in)3,471cc (212 cu-in)
Block/head materialAluminum
ValvetrainSingle overhead camshaft
Compression ratio (x:1)10.5
Redline (rpm)6,800
Horsepower (hp @ rpm)271 @ 6,200
Torque (lb-ft @ rpm)254 @ 5,000
Transmission typeFive-speed automatic
Transmission and axle ratios (x:1)1st: 2.697, 2nd: 1.606, 3rd: 1.071, 4th: 0.766, 5th: 0.612
Chassis
Suspension, frontDouble wishbone
Suspension, rearMultilink
Steering typeSpeed-proportional power steering
Steering ratio (x:1)15.2
Tire brandMichelin
Tire modelLatitude Tour HP
Tire typeAll-season
Tire size, frontP225/60R18 H
Tire size, rearP225/60R18 H
Wheel size18-by-8 inches front and rear
Wheel materialAlloy
Brakes, frontVentilated disc
Brakes, rearDisc
Track Test Results
0-45 mph (sec.)5.1
0-60 mph (sec.)7.8
0-75 mph (sec.)11.2
1/4-mile (sec. @ mph)15.7 @ 90.1
0-60 with 1 foot of rollout (sec.)7.4
Braking, 30-0 mph (ft.)32
60-0 mph (ft.)129
Slalom, 6 x 100 ft. (mph)63.4
Skid pad, 200-ft. diameter (lateral g)0.77
Sound level @ idle (dB)38.7
@ Full throttle (dB)65.0
@ 70 mph cruise (dB)57.5
Test Driver Ratings & Comments
Acceleration commentsFeels soft, slower than Venza when it comes to throttle response and tranny response. Overall powertrain is less impressive than Venza.
Braking ratingAverage
Braking commentsNo fade at the pedal until slowing down from acceleration runs. However, each run was progressively longer. As with most Hondas, the Crosstour's setup could use more thermal capacity.
Handling ratingAverage
Handling comments(Skid pad) Excessive understeer and body roll. Doesn't like midcorner bumps. Could use more damping, blah steering feel. (Slalom) Body roll makes transitions a real adventure and increases stability control intervention. Off does mean off with the stability control, though. Even so, soft chassis and hard tires make it a handful compared to the Venza.
Testing Conditions
Elevation (ft.)1,121
Temperature (F)64.6
Wind (mph, direction)41.7
Fuel Consumption
EPA fuel economy (mpg)17 city/25 highway
Edmunds observed (mpg)N/A
Fuel tank capacity (U.S. gal.)18.5
Dimensions & Capacities
Curb weight, mfr. claim (lbs.)4,070
Curb weight, as tested (lbs.)4,035
Weight distribution, as tested, f/r (%)49.1/50.9
Length (in.)196.8
Width (in.)74.7
Height (in.)65.7
Wheelbase (in.)110.1
Track, front (in.)64.9
Track, rear (in.)64.9
Turning circle (ft.)40.2
Legroom, front (in.)42.2
Legroom, rear (in.)37.0
Headroom, front (in.)39.5
Headroom, rear (in.)37.5
Shoulder room, front (in.)57.8
Shoulder room, rear (in.)56.2
Seating capacity5
Cargo volume (cu-ft)25.7
Max. cargo volume, seats folded (cu-ft)51.3
Warranty
Bumper-to-bumper3 years/36,000 miles
Powertrain5 years/60,000 miles
Corrosion5 years/Unlimited miles
Free scheduled maintenanceNot available
Safety
Front airbagsStandard
Side airbagsStandard dual front
Head airbagsStandard front and rear
Knee airbagsNot available
Antilock brakesFour-wheel ABS
Electronic brake enhancementsBraking assist, electronic brakeforce distribution
Traction controlStandard
Stability controlStandard
Rollover protectionStandard
Tire-pressure monitoring systemTire-pressure monitoring
Emergency assistance systemNot available
NHTSA crash test, driverNot tested
NHTSA crash test, passengerNot tested
NHTSA crash test, side frontNot tested
NHTSA crash test, side rearNot tested
NHTSA rollover resistanceNot tested
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Edmunds Insurance Estimator

The Edmunds TCO® estimated monthly insurance payment for a 2009 Toyota Venza in VA is:

$110 per month*
* Explanation
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