2014 Honda Odyssey vs. 2014 Toyota Sienna

  • Full Review
  • Pricing & Specs
  • Road Tests
  • Comparison (1)
  • Long-Term

2014 Toyota Sienna Minivan

(3.5L V6 6-speed Automatic)
  • Honda Odyssey vs Toyota Sienna - Edmunds A-Rated Minivans Face Off

    Watch Alistair Weaver moderate a debate between Edmunds Editors James Riswick and Mike Monticello in this 5-category (Performance/Fun to Drive, Comfort, Interior and Value) comparison between the Edmunds A-Rated Toyota Sienna and Honda Odyssey Minivans. For more info on the Honda Odyssey: http://www.edmunds.com/honda/odyssey/2014/ For more info on the Toyota Sienna: http://www.edmunds.com/toyota/sienna/2014/ | July 25, 2014

1 Video , 61 Photos

  • Article
  • 2014 Honda Odyssey Specs and Performance
  • 2014 Toyota Sienna Specs and Performance

Though they're fraught with stigma, minivans are unquestionably the most perfect expressions of rolling utility sold today. Sliding doors accommodate full-handed moms, temper youthful indiscretion and welcome narrow parking spaces. Massive cargo areas enable domestic duties while modest powertrains provide practical operating costs. These, friends, are the Conestoga wagons of the 21st century.

And we like both of these vans.


2014 Toyota Sienna

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In fact, both the 2014 Honda Odyssey and the 2014 Toyota Sienna receive "A" ratings from Edmunds. Which is as good a reason as any to compare them again to see if one van has pulled ahead in any one aspect or another.

See the ratings here: 2014 Honda Odyssey, 2014 Toyota Sienna.

2014 Honda Odyssey vs. 2014 Toyota Sienna

A Familiar Friend — Now With a Vacuum
Though Honda's workhorse isn't redesigned for 2014, it has been modestly updated. Dimensionally the van remains the same as the 2011-'13 models, though there are subtle changes to the body and interior. New standard and available features include Bluetooth streaming audio, a Pandora streaming music interface and — wait for it — a built-in vacuum.

The familiar 3.5-liter V6 remains and is now paired with a six-speed automatic transmission across the line. Last year only Touring and Touring Elite models were available with the more efficient six-speed gearbox. Rated at 248 horsepower, the Odyssey's V6 isn't the most powerful engine in the segment but it is among the smoothest and quietest V6s sold today.

Starting at $29,655 for a base-trim EX model, the Odyssey's base price increases only $150 in 2014. Our tester, however, can make no modest claims, as it's the full-zoot Touring Elite trim and stickers for $45,280.

2014 Honda Odyssey vs. 2014 Toyota Sienna

The Go-To Comfort Machine
Toyota's Sienna has no significant changes for 2014. In other words, it remains the practical, comfortable, versatile machine it has been for many years. And it's the only minivan sold in the U.S. with available all-wheel drive.

The Sienna also comes with a 3.5-liter V6, though in the Toyota it's rated at 266 hp. A six-speed automatic transmission is the only available gearbox, but with manual-shift abilities it offers more control than the Odyssey's tranny.

At $27,780, including shipping, Toyota's base 2014 Sienna starts almost $2 grand below the Odyssey. Our front-drive Limited model tester included the unfortunately named Limited Convenience package for $890. Despite this, we found the package's HID headlamps, automatic high beams and rain-sensing wipers to be superbly convenient.

Toyota asks $41,990 for a Sienna with such equipment.

How Do They Drive?
If you're buying a conventional minivan, you're probably more sensitive to the nuances of diaper rash and colic than you are to steering feel. Even so, there are differences worth considering between these two vans.

We'll make it simple: The Honda handles better. The Toyota has the more responsive engine and transmission.

Though the race to freeway speeds (60 mph) is a wash (8.0 seconds Odyssey, 8.1 seconds Sienna) it's the Toyota's livelier throttle response and more versatile transmission that win us over. Pulling away from a stop and quick acceleration at medium speeds require less effort in the more powerful Sienna. The Odyssey requires more commitment to the gas pedal to perform the same moves.

2014 Honda Odyssey vs. 2014 Toyota Sienna

One clear advantage for the Sienna is its manually shiftable transmission. The ability to select a specific gear and hold it (both during engine braking and acceleration) is a feature not available to the Odyssey driver. And in certain situations, like climbing or descending a long grade, the ability to pick a gear and stay there is a nice feature.

Faced with a twisty road of any length, we'd probably switch camps. The Odyssey's steering weight and response coupled with less body roll are rare qualities among minivans. There's an honesty to the Honda's responses that gives us confidence but never compromises ride quality.

Neither van is uncomfortable, however. From the front seats, both of these machines are supremely relaxing. Move to the second row, however, and it's a matter of personal taste.

Which Interior Is More Functional?
Both vans do a fine job of providing nooks and crannies in which to store personal items, drinks and more. But it's the Honda's well-hewn materials that give it the nod in quality. Up front, the Sienna's abundance of panels and standout "wood-grain-style" trim are less coherent and less attractive than the Odyssey's simple gray theme.

In Touring Elite trim, the Odyssey provides an 8-inch touchscreen for many secondary controls including phone pairing, which is far superior to the Sienna's mandatory voice-activated system. Otherwise, the Sienna's logical grouping of large buttons works well enough, even though some are quite a reach from the driver seat.

Both vans offer dual-zone climate control for front passengers, but only the Honda provides knobs for both zones. Rear climate controls are available in both second rows.

2014 Honda Odyssey vs. 2014 Toyota Sienna

In our Limited trim Sienna, it's the second-row lounge-style seats that most clearly distinguish its comfort priority from the Odyssey's highly practical design. Though a conventional bench-style second row is also available in lower-trim Siennas, it's these recliners that say the most about the priorities of its owner. In this configuration it accommodates seven passengers to the Honda's eight.

Accessing the third row is easier in the Sienna, however. Long sliders allow its second-row seats to move far enough forward to provide adult-size access to the third row.

What About Child Seats and Usable Space?
When it comes to child seat installation and flexibility, the Odyssey's modular bench seat is hard to beat. It consists of two seats and a removable folding seat/console that offer LATCH fasteners for three child seats. The Sienna's individual sliding lounge seats accommodate one LATCH fastener each.

But it's the Honda's second-row flexibility that's truly novel here. Remove the center seat and the outer seats can be repositioned inboard to better accommodate third-row access.

Surprisingly, the Sienna's third row offers only one centrally mounted LATCH fastener, while the Odyssey's third row provides two. On the matter of child seats, the Odyssey has a slight advantage.

2014 Honda Odyssey vs. 2014 Toyota Sienna

Seat stowage and removal fall in the Odyssey's favor as well. Though they're removable, the Sienna's lounge seats weigh 76 pounds each and aren't nearly as easy to take out as the Honda's 55-pound second-row chairs. Its third-row seats stow into the floor in a matter of seconds with a single-motion strap pull. Power operation makes the Sienna's 60/40-split folding third-row button-push easy, but relative to the Honda, it's needlessly slow and complex.

Cargo space is a near wash. With all its seats upright, the Sienna's 39.1 cubic feet are inconsequentially bigger than the Odyssey's 38.4 cubes. Remove the second row and sink the third rows into the floor and the story is similar: 148.5 cubic feet in the Odyssey, 150 cubic feet in the Sienna.

Both of these vans offer the kind of space we expect in a modern minivan. But in a nod to trucklike utility, the Honda's load floor is flat with its seats removed, allowing for easier and more secure cargo hauling. The Sienna's third-row seats aren't completely recessed, nor are its second-row sliders once the seats are removed.

How Safe Are They?
Both vans receive five-star overall crash test ratings from the government and "Good" scores across the board from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS). The IIHS also gave the Odyssey its Top Safety Pick award for 2014.

Touring Elite trim Odysseys get forward collision warning and lane-departure warning systems. The Sienna offers both a driver's knee airbag and a blind-spot monitor with rear cross-traffic alert. Both vans have a rearview camera, but the Odyssey's offers several different view angles and perspectives. What's more, the Sienna's display screen is so small that it compromises the camera's usefulness.

2014 Honda Odyssey vs. 2014 Toyota Sienna

One big item missing on the Touring Elite level of the Odyssey is Honda's LaneWatch feature. It displays the passenger side rear-quarter view in the dash-mounted screen when the right turn signal is activated. Oddly, it's included on lower trims but not the Touring Elite.

Which One Delivers Better Fuel Economy?
Traditionally, Honda's Odyssey proves itself as the minivan with the best fuel economy in our tests. It beats the Sienna here by earning 20.6 mpg combined to the Sienna's 19.1 mpg combined in our real-world testing.

Its EPA ratings are consistently better than the Toyota as well. At 22 mpg combined (19 city/28 highway) the gap to the Sienna (21 combined/18 city/25 highway) isn't huge. It's a difference that works out to only about $100 annually at 12,000 miles per year. We wouldn't base a purchase decision on this difference, but every little bit helps.

What About the Tech?
Technology is one area where the Odyssey's higher trim level and higher base price begins to show genuine family-oriented benefits over the Sienna. Of course, the navigation system is a real boon, but so are the other technologies including HondaLink, which allows access to multiple cloud-based technologies like music, weather and traffic updates. The free smartphone app also allows drivers to hear Facebook and Twitter updates.

2014 Honda Odyssey vs. 2014 Toyota Sienna

But it's the massive 16.2-inch rear-seat entertainment system and 12-speaker, 650-watt audio system that turn the Odyssey into a mobile theater sure to sedate even the most, uh, enterprising little ones. The haul to Grandma's place is more easily accommodated by both HDMI and RCA inputs, which allow all manner of devices to utilize the screen.

By comparison, the Sienna Limited offers two sunroofs. Though they're sure to provide a stunning view of the sky above, we're certain our kids prefer to watch Frozen. Both vans offer USB and aux jacks and 12-volt outlets, but the Odyssey adds a 115-volt AC outlet as well. Bluetooth phone connectivity and audio streaming are standard in both.

The Winner
This test is largely decided by the philosophy of the buyer. To us a minivan is ultimately a utility tool: a vehicle for moving families and their goods with as little resistance as possible. And when it comes to those tasks the Odyssey's flexibility and quality are hard to beat. If we were after comfort, we'd lean toward the Sienna's recliners and marginally softer ride.

2014 Honda Odyssey vs. 2014 Toyota Sienna

We can't ignore the fact that several of our criticisms of the Sienna's content (or lack thereof) are a result of our particular test van's packaging. Of course, that's reflected in its lower price as well. The $4,105 Limited Premium package would bring both a widescreen rear-seat entertainment system and 7-inch touchscreen navigation system to this van. It would also increase its price to exceed that of the Odyssey by $815.

So even though the Sienna delivers a solid package sure to please many, it's the Odyssey's comprehensive convenience that wins this test. Well, that and the built-in vacuum.

Toyota provided the Sienna for the purpose of evaluation.

Vehicle
Model year2014 Honda Odyssey
Year Make Model2014 Honda Odyssey Touring Elite 4dr Minivan (3.5L 6cyl 6A)
Vehicle TypeFWD 4dr 8-passenger minivan
Base MSRP$45,280
As-tested MSRP$45,280
Assembly locationLincoln, Alabama
North American parts content (%)75
Drivetrain
ConfigurationTransverse, front-engine, front-wheel drive
Engine typeNaturally aspirated, port-injected V6, gasoline with cylinder deactivation
Displacement (cc/cu-in)3,471/212
Block/head materialAluminum/aluminum
ValvetrainSOHC, 4 valves per cylinder, variable intake + exhaust-valve timing
Compression ratio (x:1)10.5
Redline, indicated (rpm)6,250
Fuel cutoff/rev limiter (rpm)6,300
Horsepower (hp @ rpm)248 @ 5,700
Torque (lb-ft @ rpm)250 @ 4,800
Fuel typeRegular unleaded
Transmission typeSix-speed automatic
Transmission ratios (x:1)1=3.35, II=1.48, III=1.48, IV=1.06, V=0.75, VI=0.55
Final-drive ratio (x:1)4.25
Differential(s)Front: open
Chassis
Suspension, frontIndependent MacPherson struts, coil springs, stabilizer bar
Suspension, rearIndependent double-wishbone, coil springs, stabilizer bar
Steering typeHydraulic-assist, speed-proportional rack-and-pinion power steering
Steering ratio (x:1)16.4
Tire make and modelMichelin Primacy MXV4
Tire typeAll-season front and rear
Tire sizeP235/60R18 102T M+S
Wheel size18-by-7 inches front and rear
Wheel materialAlloy
Brakes, front12.6-inch one-piece ventilated cast-iron discs with two-piston sliding calipers
Brakes, rear13.1-inch one-piece solid cast-iron discs with single-piston sliding calipers
Track Test Results
0-30 mph, trac ON (sec.)3.1
0-45 mph, trac ON (sec.)5.3
0-60 mph, trac ON (sec.)8.0
0-75 mph, trac ON (sec.)11.7
1/4-mile, trac ON (sec. @ mph)15.9 @ 87.1
0-60, trac ON with 1 foot of rollout (sec.)7.7
Braking, 30-0 mph (ft.)32
60-0 mph (ft.)131
Slalom, 6 x 100 ft. (mph) ESC ON62.6
Skid pad, 200-ft. diameter (lateral g)0.75
Skid pad, 200-ft. diameter (lateral g) ESC ON0.75
Sound level @ idle (dB)39.8
@ Full throttle (dB)73.7
@ 70 mph cruise (dB)63.1
Engine speed @ 70 mph (rpm)1,950
Test Driver Ratings & Comments
Acceleration commentsAll acceleration runs made with ESC and Trac on to best simulate real-world runs. This is essentially a mash the pedal and go endeavor. The Odyssey's V6 is smooth and never obtrusive inside. Shifts are rapid but not shocking and come near redline. Minimal wheelspin off the line.
Braking commentsThough the Odyssey's brakes function well in a panic situation, they still don't bring it to a stop as short as the Sienna. And, like most Hondas, it demonstrates a lack of ability to overcome heat after repreated slowing from high speed. We witnessed a shimmy though the steering and body when slowing from high speed after acceleration runs. No pedal fade, however.
Handling commentsSlalom: The Odyssey is as intuitive and predictable here as a vehicle this tall and heavy can possibly be. Reasonable steering weight and decent body control allow it to be weaved through the cones with good control. And when ESC steps in it does so mildly, only making small corrections to keep the van under control without taking control from the driver. Skid pad: Understeer is only moderate in the Odyssey, which is surprising. Good (for a minivan) sense of what's going on at the tire/road interface. Easy to control.
Testing Conditions
Test date7/1/2014
Elevation (ft.)1,121
Temperature (F)80.3
Relative humidity (%)51.56
Barometric pressure (in. Hg)28.66
Wind (mph, direction)1.0, head and cross
Odometer (mi.)6,647
Fuel used for test87 octane
As-tested tire pressures, f/r (psi)35/35
Fuel Consumption
EPA fuel economy (mpg)22 combined/19 city/28 highway
Edmunds observed (mpg)20.6
Fuel tank capacity (U.S. gal.)21.0
Driving range (mi.)588
Audio and Advanced Technology
Stereo description650-watt AM/FM/CD/MP3/WMA with 12 speakers including subwoofer
iPod/digital media compatibilityUSB port, aux jack
Satellite radioStandard, subscription required
Hard-drive music storage capacity (Gb)15GB
Rear seat video and entertainmentStandard DVD player RCA inputs, HDMI input
Bluetooth phone connectivityStandard
Navigation systemStandard
Smart entry/StartStandard ignition, doors, hatch
Parking aidsStandard parking sonar front and rear back-up camera
Blind-spot detectionStandard
Lane-departure monitoringStandard departure warning
Collision warning/avoidanceStandard forward collision warning
Driver coaching displayStandard
Dimensions & Capacities
Curb weight, mfr. claim (lbs.)4,613
Curb weight, as tested (lbs.)4,607
Weight distribution, as tested, f/r (%)53/47
Length (in.)202.9
Width (in.)79.2
Height (in.)68.4
Wheelbase (in.)118.1
Track, front (in.)68.1
Track, rear (in.)68.2
Turning circle (ft.)36.7
Legroom, front (in.)40.9
Legroom, rear (in.)40.9
Legroom, 3rd row (in.)42.4
Headroom, front (in.)38.3
Headroom, rear (in.)39.4
Headroom, 3rd row (in.)38.0
Shoulder room, front (in.)64.4
Shoulder room, rear (in.)63.5
Shoulder room, 3rd row (in.)60.9
Seating capacity8
Max cargo volume behind 1st row (cu-ft)148.5
behind 2nd row (cu-ft)93.1
behind 3rd row (cu-ft)38.4
Tow capacity, mfr. claim (lbs.)3,500
Ground clearance (in.)4.5
Warranty
Bumper-to-bumper3 years/36,000 miles
Powertrain5 years/60,000 miles
Corrosion5 years/Unlimited miles
Vehicle
Model year2014 Toyota Sienna
Year Make Model2014 Toyota Sienna Limited 7-passenger 4dr minivan (3.5L 6cyl 6A)
Vehicle TypeFWD 4dr 7-passenger minivan
Base MSRP$41,100
Options on test vehiclePredawn Gray Mica, Limited Convenience Package ($890 -- includes high-intensity-discharge (HID) headlamps with auto-off feature; automatic high beam feature; rain-sensing washers with variable intermittent windshield wipers)
As-tested MSRP$41,990
Assembly locationPrinceton, Indiana
Drivetrain
ConfigurationTransverse, front-engine, front-wheel drive
Engine typeNaturally aspirated, port-injected V6, gasoline
Displacement (cc/cu-in)3,456/211
Block/head materialAluminum/aluminum
ValvetrainDOHC, 4 valves per cylinder
Compression ratio (x:1)10.8
Redline, indicated (rpm)6,500
Horsepower (hp @ rpm)266 @ 6,200
Torque (lb-ft @ rpm)245 @ 4,700
Fuel typeRegular unleaded
Transmission typeSix-speed automatic with console shifter
Transmission ratios (x:1)1=3.30, II=1.90, III=1.42, IV=1.00, V=0.713, VI=0.608
Final-drive ratio (x:1)3.93
Differential(s)Front: open
Chassis
Suspension, frontIndependent MacPherson struts, coil springs, stabilizer bar
Suspension, rearSemi-independent twist beam-axle, coil springs, stabilizer bar
Steering typeElectric-assist rack-and-pinion power steering
Steering ratio (x:1)15.5
Tire make and modelGoodyear Eagle RS-A
Tire typeAll-season front and rear
Tire sizeP235/55R18 99V M+S
Wheel size18-by-7 inches front and rear
Wheel materialAlloy
Brakes, front12.9-inch one-piece ventilated cast-iron discs with two-piston sliding calipers
Brakes, rear12.2-inch solid cast-iron discs with single-piston sliding calipers
Track Test Results
0-30 mph, trac ON (sec.)3.1
0-45 mph, trac ON (sec.)5.3
0-60 mph, trac ON (sec.)8.1
0-75 mph, trac ON (sec.)11.7
1/4-mile, trac ON (sec. @ mph)15.9 @ 88.6
0-60, trac ON with 1 foot of rollout (sec.)7.7
Braking, 30-0 mph (ft.)31
60-0 mph (ft.)126
Slalom, 6 x 100 ft. (mph) ESC ON60.9
Skid pad, 200-ft. diameter (lateral g)0.75
Skid pad, 200-ft. diameter (lateral g) ESC ON0.76
Sound level @ idle (dB)41.0
@ Full throttle (dB)73.4
@ 70 mph cruise (dB)64.5
Test Driver Ratings & Comments
Acceleration commentsAll acceleration runs performed with both ESC and traction control on to better simulate real-world scenarios. Even with the electronics ruling the day, the Sienna gets some wheelspin off the line. Manual shifting adds no benefit to acceleration runs. With tranny in Drive it's a matter of mashing the pedal and holding on. Toyota's 3.5 V6 feels stronger in midrange than Honda despite having lower peak torque.
Braking commentsStrong brake feel and good stopping distances. No distance or pedal fade throughout. Even slowing from accel run, the Sienna provides strong pedal feel and good response.
Handling commentsSlalom: With soft springs and modest damping and body control the Sienna is no joy in the slalom. Control is moderate and ESC is overeager, which means driving slowly and smoothly is the key to getting through the slalom without interruption from the electronics. It's very easy to overstep the Sienna's low limits and end up hitting the ESC wall. Skid pad: The Sienna burdens its front tires in a painful way around the skid pad. Even with ESC off the balance is heavy understeer (and ESC is never truly off).
Testing Conditions
Test date7/1/2014
Elevation (ft.)1,121
Temperature (F)78.8
Relative humidity (%)54.4
Barometric pressure (in. Hg)28.67
Wind (mph, direction)3.5, head and cross
Odometer (mi.)2,566
Fuel used for test87 octane
As-tested tire pressures, f/r (psi)35/35
Fuel Consumption
EPA fuel economy (mpg)21 combined/18 city/25 highway
Edmunds observed (mpg)19.1
Fuel tank capacity (U.S. gal.)20.0
Driving range (mi.)500
Audio and Advanced Technology
Stereo descriptionJBL AM/FM/MP3 six-disc changer, 10 speakers
iPod/digital media compatibilityUSB port, aux jack
Satellite radioStandard S/XM with 90-day trial
Bluetooth phone connectivityStandard
Smart entry/StartStandard, ignition, doors, hatch
Parking aidsStandard parking sonar front and rear back-up camera
Blind-spot detectionStandard with cross-traffic detection
Dimensions & Capacities
Curb weight, mfr. claim (lbs.)4,515
Curb weight, as tested (lbs.)4,589
Weight distribution, as tested, f/r (%)57/43
Length (in.)200.2
Width (in.)78.1
Height (in.)70.7
Wheelbase (in.)119.3
Track, front (in.)67.7
Track, rear (in.)67.7
Turning circle (ft.)37.5
Legroom, front (in.)40.5
Legroom, rear (in.)37.6
Legroom, 3rd row (in.)36.3
Headroom, front (in.)39.1
Headroom, rear (in.)38.0
Headroom, 3rd row (in.)35.9
Shoulder room, front (in.)65.0
Shoulder room, rear (in.)64.6
Shoulder room, 3rd row (in.)61.1
Seating capacity7
Max cargo volume behind 1st row (cu-ft)150.0
behind 2nd row (cu-ft)117.8
behind 3rd row (cu-ft)39.1
Tow capacity, mfr. claim (lbs.)3,500
Ground clearance (in.)6.5
Warranty
Bumper-to-bumper3 years/36,000 miles
Powertrain5 years/60,000 miles
Corrosion5 years/Unlimited miles
Roadside assistance2 years/25,000 miles
Free scheduled maintenance2 years/25,000 miles
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The Edmunds TCO® estimated monthly insurance payment for a 2014 Toyota Sienna in VA is:

$141 per month*
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