2014 Rolls-Royce Wraith Coupe - Rating Details


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Edmunds Rating
Vehicle Tested 2014 Rolls-Royce Wraith Coupe (6.6L V12 Twin-turbo 8-speed Automatic) Driven On 11/27/2013 Ratings Summary Rolls-Royce has been the standard by which all luxury cars are measured for decades. Yet the Wraith still manages to surpass expectations. It features exemplary materials, wonderful workmanship, a pillowy ride, surprising speed and over-the-top styling. And you'll pay dearly for all of it.
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Performance The Wraith features a 6.6-liter, twin-turbo V12 that produces 624 horsepower. Acceleration is effortless, and perhaps this engine is even a little too quiet. Handling is impressive for its weight and the brakes are phenomenal.
Acceleration
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The 5,381-pound Wraith needs only 4.7 seconds to get to 60 mph, and it couldn't be easier or smoother. It squats down significantly on acceleration, which just makes the event more exciting.
Braking
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In daily driving the Wraith's brakes are light with a long pedal travel and zero touchiness. During our panic-stop test, the Rolls needed only 109 feet to stop from 60 mph. Amazing.
Steering
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Steering response is surprisingly good with no slop and decent precision. The wheel is thicker than in other Rolls products. Light effort, good feedback.
Handling
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The Wraith isn't a natural handler and didn't respond well to our slalom test. In normal driving, however, the Wraith has surprising grip. You'll find yourself driving it far faster than you'd expect.
Driveability
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The 8-speed automatic is so smooth you barely know it's there. Every input you give this car is rewarding, yet there's not a single intrusive thing about it.
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Comfort Comfort is Rolls-Royce's wheelhouse, and they sure didn't drop the ball with the Wraith. There are few, if any, cars as comfortable as this.
Seating Comfort
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The leather is perfect, soft as a high-end leather jacket. Bolstering is good; long-haul comfort is second-to-none.
Ride Comfort
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Nothing gets through the Wraith that Rolls-Royce doesn't want there. There's enough information to make the Wraith driveable, but with no unpleasantness. Ever.
Quietness
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Driving the Wraith is like putting the outside world on mute. Wind and tire noise are nil, even at elevated track speeds.
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Interior Materials are a step above top-notch, and the rear-hinged doors are beyond cool. Some of the shared-with-BMW parts, however, feel out of place even if they work well.
Ergonomics
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Rolls uses a version of BMW's iDrive infotainment system, with mixed success.The controls and switchgear work well, but if you've been in a BMW 7-Series, you'll be too familiar with these pieces.
Ingress/Egress
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The doors hinge at the rear, which is the opposite of every other car on sale today. Turns out, this makes front-seat entry a snap. Getting into the rear seats, though, is more difficult.
Space/Room
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The Wraith is huge inside. The front seats offer a ton of room in every direction, and the back seats are shockingly spacious even if they're a little tricky to get into.
Visibility
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The Rolls has a small rear window that's tricky to see out of and small mirrors. It has lots of cameras and warning systems to make up for this, though. It's easy to drive, easy to park.
Cargo/Storage
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The Wraith's trunk measures 16.6 cubic-feet and is incredibly deep. Multiple golf bags deep. The carpeting in the trunk is plusher than in most houses.
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Value The 2014 Rolls-Royce Wraith has a starting price of $284,900 and an as-tested price over $350,000. It's one of the nicest cars you can buy. And you can go ahead and buy it, because we sure can't afford it.
Build Quality (vs. $)
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Yes, there are some interior bits from lesser BMWs, but nearly everything is expertly finished and the materials are outstanding. The wood door panels are worthy of fine watercraft.
Features(vs. $)
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Our loaded Wraith had a starry-night LED headliner, radar cruise control, lane departure warning, night vision, lambswool carpeting, a 1,300-watt stereo and a sticker price of $367,875.
Cost
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Judging the price of luxury goods can be a fruitless endeavor. In the Wraith's case, it costs what it costs and the people buying it don't seem to care.
MPG
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The EPA rates the 624-horsepower Wraith at 15 mpg Combined (13 City/21 Highway). We averaged 18 mpg overall, though just 16.4 mpg on our 116-mile Edmunds evaulation loop.
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Fun To Drive Driving a Rolls-Royce is an epic experience, doubly-so in the case of this Wraith. From the the rear-hinged doors to the reverse sweep of the Power Reserve meter (instead of a tachometer), everything about this coupe is special.
Driving Experience
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Gobs of power, lush materials, solid brakes. Excellent body control, too. There's a bit of roll and then it takes a firm set through turns. Driving the Wraith is a unique event.
Personality
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The doors open the wrong way and close themselves! The Spirit of Ecstasy (the hood ornament) pops up/down automatically! It's 17-feet long and only has two doors! It's a showoff.
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