2014 Nissan Versa Note Hatchback - Rating Details


C
Edmunds Rating
Vehicle Tested 2014 Nissan Versa Note SV Hatchback (1.6L 4-cyl. CVT Automatic) Driven On 11/5/2013 Ratings Summary In this ever-growing subcompact segment, which sees 10 hatchbacks below $15,000 (there are more than 30 below $25K), the Nissan Versa Note ticks most of the necessary economy hatchback boxes. But there are several more refined and/or exciting choices out there for you.
C
Performance With a meager 109-hp 1.6-liter four-cylinder engine, non-traditional transmission and uninspiring handling, the Versa Note offers little in terms of performance. Economy car seekers will care not, but driving enthusiasts will be left cold.
Acceleration
C
Nearly 18 seconds to run the quarter-mile isn't going to break any records, and neither will 0-60 in 10.4 sec. The SV model's continuously variable transmission (CVT) draws deserved criticism.
Braking
C
An uncharacteristically firm pedal and quick response for this econo segment. Still, in Edmunds testing the Versa Note required 125 feet to stop from 60 mph, slightly longer than average.
Steering
D
Perhaps the worst part of this car, the Versa's fuel-saving electric-assist power steering offers artificial, springy feedback and lackluster response.
Handling
C
Despite the lack of dynamic feedback, the Versa Note managed to show reasonable handling prowess. But we still wouldn't classify taking corners in the Versa as fun, nor confidence-inspiring.
Driveability
B
In spite of its tepid performance, the Versa Note is a willing day-to-day driver. Its small size makes it a good grocery-getter and an easy parker. The high-winding CVT can be annoying.
C
Comfort Below average seat comfort, a small-car ride, and seemingly little effort from Nissan to minimize wind, road and engine noise. Hence the lackluster scores in these categories.
Seating Comfort
C
A rare instance where the rear seats offer more room/comfort than the fronts. The lumpy buckets offer decent adjustment but little lateral support. And the driving position is awkward.
Ride Comfort
C
Typical small-car ride comfort. That means it feels busy over bumps, and it's susceptible to crosswinds. Others in the segment do a better job here.
Quietness
C
Wind, tire and engine noise are noticeably evident most of the time, and will prove excessive for some.
B
Interior A few clever and unexpected measures offset the usual subcompact interior qualities/liabilities. The Versa Note SV's materials are notably better than those on the lower trim levels.
Ergonomics
C
Drivers of slightly above-average height will find the ergonomics challenging. The driving position, armrests and placement of window switches feel out of place.
Ingress/Egress
B
Easy entry/exit both front and rear. Of note (no pun intended), the rear doors open approximately 90 degrees for unusually good access when your parking space allows for it.
Space/Room
B
Rear seat room is excellent, particularly leg room. The cabin feels open and airy for such a small car.
Visibility
B
We found the sight lines above average for a hatchback, with no egregious blind spots. The optional rearview and around-view cameras are unusual for this segment.
Cargo/Storage
B
The available trunk space seems smaller than the 21.4/38.3 cu-ft of claimed luggage capacity. But the rear seats do fold flat and there's a clever 2-tiered cargo floor (optional).
B
Value Decent build quality, exceptional available options and good fuel economy contribute to the value of the Versa Note.
Build Quality (vs. $)
B
The overall build quality of the Versa Note is commensurate with the price point across the trim levels. But even our top-level SV test car reminds you that you're in an economy car.
Features(vs. $)
A
The car's basic features are decent. But the optional pushbutton start, heated seats, touchscreen nav w/traffic, weather, satellite radio, around-view monitor, etc. are rare for this class.
Cost
B
While the Versa sedan starts at $12,800, the Versa Note hatchback begins at $14,800. Our loaded SV test car rang up at $19,300. Overall, the Versa Note is competitively priced.
MPG
B
We achieved 32 mpg over 300 miles of mixed driving, but that's not enough miles to confirm or deny the EPA's respectable rating of 35 mpg Combined (31 City/40 Highway).
Warranty
C
The 3-year/36,000-mile bumper-to-bumper and 5-year/60,000-mile drivetrain warranties are equal to the industry average, but well below what the Hyundai Accent offers.
Ownership
B
Edmunds owned and maintained a previous-generation Versa hatchback for a year without incident. For added peace of mind, roadside assistance is standard for 3 years/36,000 miles.
C
Fun To Drive If you're looking to have fun while driving, look elsewhere. This is a commuter car, period.
Driving Experience
D
Minimal driver involvement, numb steering, surging engine sound due to the stepless CVT transmission. It's not a bad driving experience, but it's certainly not a memorable one.
Personality
C
We appreciate the new styling and interesting options, but you'll never think of the Versa Note as anything but an econo-hatch.
ADVERTISEMENT

Research Models

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Edmunds Insurance Estimator

The Edmunds TCO® estimated monthly insurance payment for a 2014 Nissan Versa Note Hatchback in VA is:

$126 per month*
* Explanation
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT