2012 Nissan Quest Long Term Test

New Updates


Back to All Long-Term Vehicles


2012 Nissan Quest: Wrap-Up

January 18, 2013

quest_glare_1600.jpg

Read the 2012 Nissan Quest introduction to our long-term fleet.

See all of the Nissan Quest long-term updates.

What We Got
The Nissan Quest "is on the verge of becoming a segment leader," we wrote following its 2nd-place finish in our 2011 minivan comparison test. Not coincidentally, we already had the two other podium finishers of that comparison in our long-term fleet. We looked forward to side-by-side drives in the three minivans.

See full article and comment.



2012 Nissan Quest: Interior Glare

December 05, 2012

quest_glare_1600.jpg

I was about to compose a blog to compliment our 2012 Nissan Quest on its ability to manage glare in all situations. Then the freeway turned and the sun washed out half of the dash, and most importantly, the navigation screen. So I'm going to instead compliment the Quest on its ability to manage glare in most situations. Its hard to do. That sun, well, it's bright.

Mike Schmidt, Vehicle Testing Manager @ 25,350 miles

See full article and comment.


2012 Nissan Quest: Final Days, Last Errands

December 04, 2012

nissan-quest-crg3.jpg

We're just a few days away now from saying goodbye to our Nissan Quest.

I'm sad.

Who's gonna help me deliver a big box of miscellaneous Christmas lights to the Riches-Wong house, and pick up a big bucket of floor sealant and new sub-floor for my laundry room along the way?

Kelly Toepke, News Editor @ 25,346 miles

See full article and comment.


2012 Nissan Quest LE: Hauls (The World's Toughest) Stroller

November 13, 2012

IMG_2522.JPG

I am not a wuss. 

That's the message you send when you pull into the park Saturday morning with this stroller in the back of your mylifeisovermobile. It wholly cancels whatever stereotype bystanders might have cooked up about your manhood when the Quest's slab sides first met their gaze.

And then, as you deploy and assemble the world's most badass stroller, you prove it. You might drive a minivan. You might have two girls. You might even be selling this spectacular piece of baby-carrying art, but you most certainly are not a wuss.

Josh Jacquot, Senior editor

See full article and comment.


2012 Nissan Quest LE: 25,000 Milestone

November 26, 2012

Thumbnail image for Milestone_5002.jpg 25000 milestone.jpg

In late August, our 2012 Nissan Quest broke 20,000 miles. Now, nearly three months later, we've crossed the 25,000 mile mark.

In that time we've had the 22,500-mile service completed, hit Palm Springs, and went camping with some Girl Scouts.

We've only got another few weeks left with the Quest so it's unlikely we'll topple 30, but still, 25,000 aint not bad. I think we like driving this thing. 

Mike Magrath, Features Editor @ 25,000 miles

See full article and comment.


2012 Nissan Quest LE: Hauls (The World's Toughest) Stroller

November 13, 2012

IMG_2522.JPG

I am not a wuss. 

That's the message you send when you pull into the park Saturday morning with this stroller in the back of your mylifeisovermobile. It wholly cancels whatever stereotype bystanders might have cooked up about your manhood when the Quest's slab sides first met their gaze.

And then, as you deploy and assemble the world's most badass stroller, you prove it. You might drive a minivan. You might have two girls. You might even be selling this spectacular piece of baby-carrying art, but you most certainly are not a wuss.

Josh Jacquot, Senior editor

See full article and comment.


2012 Nissan Quest LE: VQ35 Fuel Curiosity

November 09, 2012

2012_quest_eng_1600.jpg

Recently, Oldham and I were compiling one of the monthly fuel economy updates. The question came up: which grade of fuel does our longterm 2012 Nissan Quest use?

It's 87 octane, but the question had me thinking about the other Nissan corporate product in our fleet that uses the same powertrain as the Quest, but requires premium.

Both the Quest and our longterm 2013 Infiniti JX35 use Nissan's VQ35 3.5-liter V6 and CVT transmission. Ostensibly the exact same hardware plunked into a different package. 

I started wondering why it is the case that one requires premium fuel and the other does not. And for some reason, I started hearing the voice inside your head:

"Well," you're thinking, "the JX probably makes oodles more power than the Quest as a result."

Not so much. The JX is rated just 5 hp and 8 lb-ft more than the Quest. Not exactly a huge difference, especially when we're dealing with a 260 hp engine as installed in the Quest.

"Well," you're thinking, "the JX probably returns significantly better fuel economy than the Quest as a result."

Nope. The Quest returns 19/24 city/hwy mpg. The FWD JX? 18/24.

"Well," you're thinking, "the JX probably weighs significantly more than the Quest. That's why its city fuel economy is a bit lower."

JX35 AWD: 4544 lb. Quest: 4592 lb.

"Well," you're thinking, "at 5.173, the JX's final drive is shorter than the Quest's 4.878. That's why its city fuel economy is a bit lower."

That's true, but the JX uses a larger rolling diameter tire package that nullifies its shorter final drive. The gearing between the JX and the Quest is effectively identical as a result.

"Well, WTF?"

Yes, WTF, indeed. So, I inquired with Infiniti as to why the JX requires premium. Maybe there's a big jump in output elsewhere in powerband that doesn't show in the peak numbers, I proposed. Here's the response from Infiniti:

"The Infiniti JX is programmed to run on premium. Smoother response, maximum power and torque. In their words, it helps give the 'Infiniti-ness the customer expects.'

If one chooses to put regular fuel in the Infiniti JX, power and torque will decrease slightly. Not necessarily exactly to the point you mentioned in the minivan offered by our corporate, mainstream brand, but it will decrease slightly.

As for that minivan, it’s programmed to run and be happy with regular. Quite the opposite of the Infiniti JX, however, in that if one does put premium fuel in it, it doesn’t increase power and torque. Therefore, in effect, the customer is wasting their money by putting premium in that vehicle."

From what I can translate, the JX does indeed see a benefit to premium in off-peak parts of the powerband, but the Quest does not. I don't quite understand why this would be the case -- perhaps the Quest's exhaust has more backpressure and/or its intake is somewhat more restrictive. Yeah, it's not a terribly satisfying conclusion. Any theories?

Jason Kavanagh, Engineering Editor

See full article and comment.


2012 Nissan Quest LE: She's Like Siri, Without the Creepy Auto Tune

November 08, 2012

Quest_voice recog.jpg

I volunteered to convoy with Monticello into the adult film badlands of the San Fernando Valley the other day. He needed to drop his track car at a shop for some work. We wound our way into a residential neighborhood and found the place, and when Mike disappeared around the back alley for what seemed like too long, I thought sure he was a goner. He'd either stumbled into a new career or a bad meth deal. 

I wanted no part of it and stared making tracks. The sweet Nav Lady inside the Quest asked me a series of questions in a clear, reassuring tone and calculated a route back to the office. The input and routing was pretty quick and flawless. The Quest doesn't let you input new destinations while driving, but it made more sense to speak my intentions anyway rather than peck at the dial and Enter button, even if parked. 

She wasn't quick enough, though. Monti eventually emerged, no entourage, no bloody nose, no bag of cash. Total letdown. 

Dan Frio, Automotive Editor

See full article and comment.


2012 Nissan Quest LE: Dealbreaker?

November 07, 2012

Quest_second row.jpg

Do minivan buyers really care about a three-passenger second row? I don't know, but the Quest doesn't offer one and it's outsold by its Odyssey and Sienna competitors. That likely owes to other factors as well; less cargo volume, love-or-loathe styling. My wife says a second-row bench is not only practical for kid hauling, but also when carrying large items - bag, box etc - that benefit from the extra stability of a seat and seatback (she also says the gaps around a center console are black holes for crumbs and wrappers).

I see her point. Bench seats are also great for curling up and catching some Z's. I tried a mock nap in the Quest second row and, actually, if you just threw a thin air or foam cushion over the center console (or the whole row), you'd be fine.

I'm curious why Nissan doesn't offer the eight-passenger option in the U.S, unlike the ElGrand model in Japan. With a middle seat option, you essentially offer two vans and extend the service life of a family's van. Two bench rows while kids are young, two captain's chairs for when they're older, at each others throats and can't share the same contact patch of seating. Our Quest is set up for that later phase, or as a luxury for adults in a business shuttle or vanpool.

I don't consider this a deal-breaker in the Quest. The rest of the van is too good. But it would make me wait it out, to see if the next refresh or generation offers the additional seat. Or it would just drive me into the seats of a new Grand Cherokee, 5-passenger limit and all.

Dan Frio, Automotive Editor

See full article and comment.


2012 Nissan Quest: 22,500-Mile Service Complete

October 30, 2012

2012_nissan_quest_actr34_lt_1222112_1600.jpg

Ninety minutes after I pulled into the service drive, our long-term Nissan Quest pulled out of the wash bay, and I watched across the parking lot as four guys quickly wiped it down.

The cashier called my name and said the total for the oil change and filter, plus tire rotation was an even $65, for which I handed over my credit card.

I happily pitched my lukewarm mocha from the dealer's complimentary coffee machine, and walked out to meet the Quest.

Kelly Toepke, News Editor @ 23,803.2 miles

See full article and comment.


2012 Nissan Quest: Regular Service

October 30, 2012

quest_22500_1600.jpg

Finally, we're able to squeeze another attempt at an oil change and tire rotation into the Nissan Quest's busy schedule. 

No appointment, but the very helpful service writer at Hooman Nissan, Michael, says he can have the service completed, plus wash the shoe polish off the Quest's windows in an hour or so.

I have plenty of work to do for the SEMA show, so I'm happy to wait it out.

Kelly Toepke, News Editor @ 23,803 miles

See full article and comment.


Leave a Comment

Research Models

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Edmunds Insurance Estimator

The Edmunds TCO® estimated monthly insurance payment for a 2012 Nissan Quest in VA is:

$131 per month*
* Explanation
ADVERTISEMENT
Have a question? We're here to help!
Chat*
Chat online with us
Email
Email us at help@edmunds.com
*Available daily 8AM-5PM Pacific