2009 Nissan GT-R Long-Term Road Test


2009 Nissan GT-R: Parting Shots

December 09, 2009

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You've read the tests. You've read the blogs. And by now, you've even read the Long Term Wrap Up.
Now, click through and read our Parting Shots and submit your own. You won't have the big Nissan to kick around anymore; give us what you've got.

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I'll never forget the first time I booted the GT-R's throttle the day we closed Glendora Mountain Road, with CHP officers working either end to stop traffic. The crush of all-wheel drive acceleration from this surprisingly large car was wholly unexpected. I could never justify owning one myself, and would probably be thoroughly frustrated at it if I did, but the few times I took the GT-R out onto various back roads for a for a quick blast were stunning. I miss it already.

Dan Edmunds, Director of Vehicle Testing

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"Our Nissan GT-R recalibrated my sense of speed. I have never felt so comfortable traveling at such a high rate of speed (on a closed course) for such a sustained period of time. But there's nothing labored or beautiful or melodramatic about it. Being in the cockpit of our GT-R, I imagine I might feel the same way if I was driving a Nozomi shinkansen train in Japan or the French TGV."
Erin Riches, Senior Editor, Edmunds.com

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"Hey GT-R, your family still owes me one Valentine's Day and one Super Bowl Sunday. Ok, so I can forgive you for Valentine's Day. But the Super Bowl? Never."
Mike Schmidt, Vehicle Testing Manager

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"Before the financial meltdown, I was seriously considering the GT-R as a replacement track-day car. Looking back, I'm glad I wasn't able to afford it. After seeing firsthand how fragile the GT-R is, and how expensive repairs and maintenance are, I'm pretty sure I would've stressed plenty of components past their breaking points and driven myself into the poor house.
"That said, the GT-R is stupid quick and I wish I had the opportunity to pilot it at Willow Springs Raceway or Laguna Seca." Mark Takahashi, Associate Editor, Edmunds.com

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"This car was oddly invisible to most people on the road except to those car geeks who, when they saw it, were thrown into an immediate lather of near-fatal maneuvering to either race it or photograph it."
Philip Reed, Edmunds Senior Consumer Advice Editor

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"One of my fondest memories of driving the GT-R will always be the first time I took my wife out in it. "What's WRONG with this thing?" was her immediate reaction to the clunking and lurching from the transmission in low-speed traffic. If I had been trying to impress her, and we hadn't already been happily married for 35 years, I would have been devastated. "
Kevin Smith, Editorial Director

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"If you like the idea of piloting a land-bound F14, the GT-R obliges with its high-tech cockpit displays, Turbofan-like soundtrack, and spine-compressing acceleration. I happen to really like that idea."
John DiPietro, Automotive Editor

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"Drove it twice and that was enough. Awesome performance, zero character (other than the jet-plane engine note). The GT-R is a video game for the street - replete with readouts by the GranTurismo guys - except your couch is quieter and doesn't ride like a skateboard. It's a numbers car, unlike its iconic R32-34 Skyline GT-R ancestors with their ripping inline-sixes and proper manual transmissions. "
Josh Sadlier, Associate Editor

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"I'd love to put its engine in a different car. Nothing else is quite like it -- that insane thrust, that jet engine noise. The rest of the car? I could do without. It has truly impressive handling capabilities, but I can't come close to its full potential on a public road without worrying that I'll have my license suspended or that I'll vaporize an unsuspecting raccoon. All the while, there is a certain disconnected feel to it. The ride is also abysmal. Even though it has the room in the cabin and trunk for a nice, long road trip, you wouldn't take it because your back would ultimately join that raccoon in the great beyond. No thanks, I'll take a used 911 instead."
James Riswick, Automotive Editor

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"Though I only drove it once, I enjoyed driving the GT-R and it became something real to me- more than just a car in a video game. Now I know what all the fuss was about and I'm over it.
It's an undeniably fast car, but too high-maintenance for my taste.
Ron Montoya, Consumer Advice Associate

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"My high hopes for Nissan's opportunity to redefine the supercar were dashed by mechanical issues and, more surprisingly, maintenance costs that turned this "budget exotic slayer" into a Ferrari with Nissan badges -- and styling."
Karl Brauer, Editor-in-Chief, Edmunds.com

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"I'm going to miss the car that made me young and hot again. I know the illusion was broken as soon as I opened the door and stepped out. But while I was in the driver's seat, I was once again in my twenties and stopping traffic.
I'm also going to miss the feeling of superiority on the road. When you drive a BMW 3 Series, an M3 will pull up next to you. When you drive an M3, a Ferrari could pull up next to you. But when you drive the Nissan GT-R, it doesn't matter what pulls up next to you because you've got them beat."
Donna DeRosa, Managing Editor.

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A completely tough, no-nonsense car, which I love. But just too big, more like a two-door sedan than a GT car. Like the Mercedes-Benz SLR McLaren, it's an amazing technical exercise that's just no fun to drive except at maximum intensity.


Michael Jordan, Executive Editor Inside Line

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Who can say this car doesn't have character? It's fast, it's weird looking, it breaks a lot, you need a specially-trained technician to work on it...that's what Ferrari guys have been saying character is for decades. It's got a lot of character, but it's not for me. Not quite.


I don't need the coupe's top speed or Nurburgring times and I don't need its useless back seat and poor rearward visibility. What I do need is something that looks and drives like this with four-doors and, most importantly, this engine/transmission. What a combo-- crazy-like-the-future noises, imperceptible shifts, acceptable fuel economy. It's just that, like Jordan said above, this isn't sporty enough to be a racecar, and it's not supple enough to be a GT. I want a GT GT-R.


But then again, I also want a station wagon with the GT500 engine/transmission, so maybe I don't count.


Mike Magrath, Vehicle Testing Assistant and Complier of Parting Shots

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Edmunds Insurance Estimator

The Edmunds TCO® estimated monthly insurance payment for a 2009 Nissan GT-R in VA is:

$151 per month*
* Explanation
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