2014 Nissan 370Z Coupe - Rating Details


B
Edmunds Rating
Vehicle Tested 2012 Nissan 370Z Base Coupe (3.7L V6 6-speed Manual w/opt Sport Pkg) Driven On 1/4/2012 Ratings Summary This rating has been carried forward from a prior year because the newer model has no substantial differences.

The 370Z is almost in a category by itself. Sure, there are nicer, more expensive sports cars. And a couple of competitors have rear seats. But very few can match the 370Z's combination of power, handling and competitive pricing.
B
Performance The Z does a pretty good job of going toe to toe with V8-powered muscle cars as well as lighter, more nimble sports cars. Along the way, it gives up a few degrees of refinement. For the most part, it's worth it.
Acceleration
A
Strong acceleration with a burly V6 soundtrack. The 370Z is a serious sports car with the credentials to match: Zero to 60 mph in about 5 seconds.
Braking
B
The brakes work fine in daily driving, and ultimate braking power is excellent. We have experienced a couple of anomalous braking events during our normal track testing protocol.
Steering
B
Steering is direct and precise, but weighty and could grow tiresome depending on your viewpoint. You'll definitely never forget you're steering a sports car.
Handling
A
Grip and stability of any 370Z will impress an enthusiast. The Sport package adds specific equipment to gain a little more. Track-ready NISMO is for hard-core drivers only.
Driveability
B
With Nissan's advent of the manual transmission rev-match feature (defeatable for DIYers), drivability has improved. Still, the 370Z isn't the best road-trip car.
B
Comfort The 370Z is a sports car; not a grand tourer. It's loud, confining and lacks cargo capacity. This is all fine if you're looking for a true sports car, but there are a few quieter, more comfortable touring cars with similar performance.
Seating Comfort
B
The seats are very comfortable and highly supportive (as most sport seats are), however the lack of a telescoping steering column might pose problems for tall drivers.
Ride Comfort
B
Despite its dedicated sports car mission, the 370Z offers a reasonably comfortable, well-damped ride. Selecting the Sport package can be tempting, but it adds harshness.
Quietness
C
Part of the 370Z experience is the sound: Tires, engine and even the transmission generate large amounts of noise. If that's music to your ears, well, then enjoy.
C
Interior The Z's interior has made incremental improvements over the years in terms of material qualities and content. However, the car's structural design limits visibility and cargo capacity.
Ergonomics
B
Controls are close at hand. The navigation system is reasonably intuitive and voice commands help. There are few oddball Z-specific controls/locations.
Ingress/Egress
C
The vertical door handle is still an egregious design error and the seating position is low, so ingress/egress can be a challenge for some. It's a low-slung sports car.
Space/Room
C
Some will find the intimate cockpit too tight and confining due the high beltline and lack of a rear seat. The dark interior colors don't exactly serve to open things up.
Visibility
C
The nature of the high-beltline, fastback body style generates typical coupelike blind spots. The optional rear-view camera helps immeasurably with parking.
Cargo/Storage
D
Typical sports car compromises: small door pockets, glovebox and center bin. The hatchback opens to reveal a high lift-over height and only about 7 cu-ft of shallow volume.
Convertible Top
B
Not available on the NISMO, the Roadster's soft top operates with one button in about 20 seconds. Trunk space is reduced from 7 to 4 cubic feet. Fixed wind deflector is standard.
B
Value There was a time when the Nissan Z represented a rare, reasonably priced, enthusiast's car. Since then, its features and cost have crept up while the competition has grown more diverse and fierce. But it remains a good value.
Build Quality (vs. $)
B
Nissan have been improving the Z's interior quality with each refresh. It's quite good now, with soft-touch materials and substantial switchgear. Paint quality is decent.
Features(vs. $)
B
Standard and optional equipment have improved with only incremental price increases, but the jump to a higher-priced sports car tier with better equipment is a small one.
Cost
B
The 370Z does, indeed, offer a lot of bang for the buck plus an instantly recognizable and sexy body. Prices now stretch from $33K-$45K before options.
MPG
B
For a high-achieving sports car, 18 city/26 highway and 21 mpg combined is about what one should expect.
Warranty
C
The basic warranty is 3 years/36,000 miles. The 5-year/60,000-mile Powertrain warranty is shy of industry standards, but expected what with its anticipated hard use.
Ownership
C
Nissan does not provide free scheduled maintenance, but does offer roadside assistance for 3 years/36,000 miles. Expect high depreciation and insurance costs.
B
Fun To Drive Given the right stretch of road and a thirst for an aural as well as visceral experience, there are few cars that offer a similarly enthralling drive.
Driving Experience
B
Because the feedback from the 370Z is delivered with a bucket instead of a tea spoon, the driving experience can be viewed as either good or bad. But never unforgettable.
Personality
A
This is definitely not a car lacking for personality. Whether you care for it is a matter of personal taste.
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Edmunds Insurance Estimator

The Edmunds TCO® estimated monthly insurance payment for a 2014 Nissan 370Z Coupe in VA is:

$139 per month*
* Explanation
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