2014 Jeep Patriot SUV - Rating Details


C
Edmunds Rating
Vehicle Tested 2014 Jeep Patriot Latitude 4x4 SUV (2.4L 4-cyl. 4x4 6-speed Automatic) Driven On 2/11/2014 Ratings Summary The Jeep Patriot has always been a bit of an underwhelming small crossover. 2014 sees a 6-speed automatic transmission replacing the CVT (Continuously Variable Transmission). This improves acceleration and driveability, but if you're looking for either a refined or warrior-ready Jeep, this still isn't the one.
C
Performance The adoption of a 6-speed automatic improves the Patriot's acceleration to 60 mph by about one second, which is impressive. But most of its rivals offer better performance and, even with the new transmission, also better driveability.
Acceleration
C
The 2.4-liter 172-hp 4-cylinder struggles to get the Patriot to 60 mph in 9.4 sec., with a nearly continual buzziness. The new 6-speed automatic shifts lazily, although it's at least fairly smooth.
Braking
C
The Patriot's panic-stop of 121 feet from 60 mph is average for the segment. There was some minor pedal fade and increased distance by our final stop. Intuitive, confident operation around town.
Steering
B
A natural feel, not too fast, not too slow with a moderate level of assist. We noticed some odd springiness each time we turned the wheel back to center during our slalom testing, but not out on the road.
Handling
C
For an off-roady-type vehicle, the Patriot has a fairly low center of gravity, which helps handling. But the shocks don't soak up bumps on backroads as well as we'd like, and the front tires lose grip easily.
Driveability
C
Overly "shifty" 6-sp automatic transmission. Weak engine required downshift from 6th gear to 4th to maintain 70 mph up our highway grade. Some low-speed gas-pedal abruptness. Turn signals self-cancel too easily.
Towing
B
The Patriot is rated to tow up to 2,000 pounds. That's better than the Ford Escape and Honda CR-V, equal to the Kia Sportage.
Off-Road
B
Without a low range and some other extra-cost off-road options, the Patriot is only marginally better than your average crossover SUV. Rough fireroads will be about this thing's maximum adventure.
B
Comfort Comfort is one of the Patriot's strong suits, with all-day-capable seats front and rear. We especially like the soft seat material and reclining rear seatbacks. But the ride is rougher than it should be and the four-cylinder engine is loud.
Seating Comfort
B
Even without adjustable lumbar support, the front seats are plenty comfortable and covered with a soft, grippy cloth. Good for all-day driving. Rear seatbacks recline, but no pulldown center armrest.
Ride Comfort
C
Initially the Patriot exhibits a soft ride. But once you start hitting actual bumps you realize the shocks don't smooth out the harshness enough. Too many sharp hits make their way into the cabin.
Quietness
C
When driving around town, the air conditioning sounded like a teapot boiling. Tire hum from lack of sound deadening. Always some 4-cylinder drone on the highway; gets raspy during hard acceleration.
C
Interior This is pretty basic stuff here. Most controls are easy to use but feel cheap. Although the front seats are easy to access, the tight rear entryway will prove problematic for bigger folks. Small-item storage space is poor.
Ergonomics
C
Shift lever has a high, easy-to-reach position. Gauges and center-stack screen are small, heat/air knobs nice and large. High-quality steering wheel buttons, other controls feel cheap. No knob for audio tuning.
Ingress/Egress
C
Wide-opening front doors, tall roof, easy step-in. Rears don't open wide at all, tiny entryway. Hard to get in/out without brushing against the wheelwell, tall rocker panels force you to lift feet up to get out.
Space/Room
B
Plenty of headroom up front. Driver's right knee rests against center console. Decent rear headroom, but cramped for door-side elbow. Good rear knee room, foot space compromised by front seat rails.
Visibility
C
Pretty good front view even with rather squat windshield. Front pillars aren't super-thin, but are short. Thicker rear pillars plus short rear side windows. Small rear window, backup camera not available.
Cargo/Storage
D
Rear hatch doesn't open high enough, easy to hit head. No front bin, small door pockets, center armrest bin too rearward. Easy folding rear seats. Cargo volume of 23.0 cu-ft is less than some rivals.
C
Value The Patiot's value is hurt slightly because, even though it's reasonably priced, it doesn't come standard with an abundance of luxury, tech or safety features like many of its rivals. Some items, like a rearview camera, aren't even available.
Build Quality (vs. $)
C
Some sharp edges, like the center armrest bin and hatch-closing pull-down slot. Most trim pieces sound hollow but leather steering wheel feels nice. Distortion from left front speaker at half audio volume.
Features(vs. $)
C
The Patriot Latitude 4x4 starts at $24,790. That price includes a leather-wrapped steering wheel with audio controls, an aux-in jack, power heated mirrors and a fold-flat front passenger seat. But no backup camera.
Cost
C
Our Patriot Latitude tester had options like the $1,295 Sun/Sound group which includes a sunroof, 9-speaker audio system (with 2 articulating liftgate speakers) and satellite radio for a $27,375 as-tested price.
MPG
C
The EPA rates the Patriot 4x4 at 23 mpg Combined (21 City/27 Highway). We averaged a dismal 21.7 mpg overall, with a reasonable 24.9 mpg on our 116-mile evaluation loop. The Ford Escape and Subaru Crosstrek are better.
Warranty
B
The Patriot's 3-year/36,000-mile basic warranty is average for the class, but the 5-year/100,000-mile drivetrain coverage is better than most, other than the Kia Sportage's 10-year/100,000-mile plan.
Ownership
B
A 5-year/100,000-mile roadside assistance plan tops the Patriot's main competitors, including the Kia Sportage. The Jeep doesn't offer a free maintenance plan, but neither do its main rivals.
C
Fun To Drive Fun-to-drive the Patriot is not, especially since this particular Jeep isn't even Trail Rated. The steering and handling are at least somewhat playful, but limits are low and the weak and wheezy engine does nothing to spice things up.
Driving Experience
C
A pretty basic driving experience, plus too much engine noise and suspension harshness. Rivals like the Ford Escape, Kia Sportage and Subaru XV Crosstrek will offer better experiences for most people.
Personality
C
Yes this Latitude has four-wheel drive, but Jeep doesn't give it a Trail Rating, which means it's not that tough. Jeeps usually are. Also, you're gonna need to like boxy bodies to fall in love with this thing.
ADVERTISEMENT

Research Models

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Edmunds Insurance Estimator

The Edmunds TCO® estimated monthly insurance payment for a 2014 Jeep Patriot Suv in VA is:

$167 per month*
* Explanation
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT