2007 Honda Fit Long-Term Road Test

Cargo Space


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2007 Honda Fit: Fit for a Dog

July 14, 2008

555 fit for a dog 2.jpg

Thanks to the unique folding properties of our 2007 Honda Fit Sport's rear seat, a trip to the groomer was easy for Rudie, our 80 lb. German Shepard mix. He came from a shelter, so the actual ingredients of the mix are anyone's guess. Rottie or Doberman are the two leading theories.

What isn't in doubt is the utter flexibility of the Fit's rear seat design. In addition to folding down the usual way to expand the volume when loaded from the hatch, the rear seat bottoms can be folded up against the seat backs to create a tall space suitable for a big dog, a bicycle or any other sort of tall, slender cargo. A big-screen, perhaps? Framed artworks? No problem. Simply load them from the curb via the rear door.

The hidden secret that makes it work even better is an unusual gas tank location--under the front seats. This provides an ultra-low and ultra-flat load floor unlike any other.

Dan Edmunds, Director of Vehicle Testing @ 25,765 miles

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2007 Honda Fit Sport: The New Mule

May 21, 2008

Above, our Fit is patiently waiting for a photo shoot to wrap. It's been getting a lot of use as the photo mule these days. So why is that?

1. For some reason the Ford GT is never available...
2. It holds everything we need it to hold.
3. It goes off road.
4. It doesn't talk about the last episode of American Idol.
5. It has a low load floor for easy car to car photography.
6. It thinks Whoopi is easily the best host on The View.
7. The lively ride keeps you awake on long drives home.
8. It gets chicks great MPG.

Kurt Niebuhr, Photo Editor @ 24,949 miles

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2007 Honda Fit: My Photo Sherpa

May 05, 2008

The Fit doesn't always get the respect it deserves. We might as well call it Rodney.

Well Rodney, my good friend, If it wasn't for you, I wouldn't be able to do my job. With your seats folded flat I'm able to haul my gear around easily...

And because you have a low cargo lift level, I'm able to take some nice car to car shots.

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What really fits in a 2007 Honda Fit Sport?

April 14, 2008

2007 Honda Fit Sport. Photo by Joanne Helperin

I took our 2007 Honda Fit Sport to the relatives' this weekend, where I was bestowed with a hand-me-down vanity set for my young daughter. The obvious question: Could I get it home in this tiny economy car?

Fortunately, the answer was yes, The vanity, which was about 17" deep and twice as high, fit nicely behind the second row of seats when turned on its side. The stool tucked in as well...

We couldn't have lowered the rear seats even if we had wanted to, because then we'd have no way to get the kids home. But all four of us, with booster seats, the vanity and a couple of bags of swim clothes (sorry America, it was 95 degrees here on Sunday) fit into the Fit.

There was no room for anything else, though... I had to choose between the vanity set and the two large plastic storage boxes I also wanted to take. But I suppose you can't demand quite that much cargo room from such a diminutive vehicle.

-- Joanne Helperin, Senior Features Editor, Miles tba

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2007 Honda Fit Sport: The Secret of Tiny Wheels

April 07, 2008

We are dope fiends for big wheels, aren't we?

It's the sidewall of the tires that we should be talking about, of course. Since big wheels simply make it possible to produce tires with narrower sidewalls, and that's the feature that delivers quicker steering response. But instead we're all over the wheels, equating bigger with better. When you look at design renderings for future concept cars, you can barely see any tire at all.

And yet the secret to the Honda Fit is its tiny wheels.

If you want real packaging efficiency with as much interior space as possible, it's a good idea to start with smaller wheels. Take a seat in the Honda Fit and you'll notice you're not swinging your legs around a giant wheel well in front of you, and there's plenty of room in the footwell to set up the pedals in a natural position... (Well kind of natural, since the Fit's driving position is calibrated for shorter drivers.)

That's the message of the Honda Fit. If you want to maximize your people space, maybe you need tiny wheels, not a bigger package.

Of course, any kid in design school would rather eat a bug than draw a car with tiny wheels.

Michael Jordan, Edmunds.com Executive Editor @ 23,804 miles

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2007 Honda Fit Sport: Honda's Minicar, Then and Now.

January 07, 2008

I haven't driven the Fit in quite some time, since before the transmission problem. And it seems, the dealer's magic fluid fix didn't do the trick, either. After hopping in and firing it up, it was reluctant to go into revo. I didn't try to force it and after maybe four or five tries (employing the old tricks like moving the selector through the other gears and moving the car forward a few inches) it slid into reverse. We're not going to let this slide and are planning another dealer visit soon, as we're looking to sell the car and want it in "no excuses" condition.

On another note, I wondered how the Fit compared to Honda's first Civic in terms of size and performance. My memory seemed to think they were like-sized. Those of you old enough to remember shows like "Happy Days" and "The Six Million Dollar Man" might know what I'm talking about -- the 1973 to 1979 Civic generation. To be as "apples to apples" as possible, let's compare that generation's Civic wagon to the Fit. Yes, they called it a wagon, even though like the Fit it was was essentially a four-door hatchback as the Civic's "wagon" portion of the body wasn't really extended in terms of additional rear overhang / length.

1977 Honda Civic Wagon
Overall Length: 160 inches
Wheelbase: 89.9 inches
Engine: 1.5-liter four with 53 horsepower
Weight: About 1700 pounds

2007 Honda Fit:
Overall Length: 157.4 inches
Wheelbase: 96.5 inches
Engine: 1.5-liter four with 109 Horsepower
Weight: 2432 pounds

As you can see, these little Hondas are within 3 inches of each other in length. In later years, automotive designers discovered the wisdom of pushing the wheels as far to the corners as possible to open up cabin space, hence the Fit's longer wheelbase even though it's shorter overall. The Fit's additional weight is significant, and due no doubt to the modern car's more robust construction and safety features such as antilock brakes and a slew of airbags, which the old Civic didn't have. The performance of the newest small Honda also benefits from three decades of development: as both vehicles have 1.5-liter inline fours, the modern version makes over twice the power, while also meeting much tougher emissions standards.

John DiPietro, Automotive Editor @ 20,606 miles

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2007 Honda Fit Sport: Lightning for 5 Feet

November 29, 2007

That stunning power plant you see before you is the 1.5-liter four-cylinder engine of the 2007 Honda Fit Sport. I'll wait a moment whilst you catch your collective breath.

I have driven this car many times, and I really like it. It's very inexpensive, it's nicely styled (actually, in my opinion, far more interesting looking than the 2009 restyle) and despite its diminutive size, surprisingly roomy and capacious inside...

But it's really kinda slow. I know, no shock. 109 horsepower and 105 pound-feet of torque. But I guess I didn't realize it in the past due to a lot of stop-and-go city driving. It's kinda like what my college friend Chris Fisher used to say about the VW Bug (the original). "Nothing beats it from zero to 5 feet." The Fit does great in 1st, not bad in 2nd and then kinda runs out of steam past about 3rd gear. I have a feeling it would drive me crazy on anything like a road trip.

I'm just a power junkie. Give me a 250-350 hp V6 and I'm like a pig in slop.

Doug Lloyd, Senior Copy Editor @ 20,204 miles

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2007 Honda Fit Sport: Fit for Five

October 01, 2007

This past weekend was the last weekend of the Los Angeles County fair, so a few friends and I decided to take our 2007 Honda Fit and drive the hour out to the fair grounds. By a few friends I mean myself plus four full size, adult passengers. I'd be lying if I said it wasn't a tight fit, however the Fit handled it just fine. What surprised me even more was that when merging onto the highway the Fit seemed to be unaffected by the full load. I guess this little car has more to offer than I thought.

Seth Compton, Broadband Production Assistant

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2007 Honda Fit Sport: Small and Friendly

September 25, 2007

Honda Fit

After having had the 2007 Honda Fit for a couple of days, I'm even more impressed with it than I was when we first added it to our fleet.

First of all, I love its dimensions. You kinda get it all with the Fit. I had to parallel-park in a spot so small it would have been a no-go for most cars; the Fit hustled its way in with a refreshing absence of drama... But you'd never know how compact it is from sitting in its roomy cabin. Shoulder- and headroom, especially, are excellent.

I also dig the way in which the Fit's shifter does its thing. This Honda may just have the friendliest shifter in its class. It offers supreme fluidity; moving from gear to gear is almost effortless.

Warren Clarke, Automotive Content Editor @ 17,305 miles

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2007 Honda Fit: Do I Fit in the Fit?

August 13, 2007

I have tried my best to avoid driving the Fit home at night. I love the little Honda -- it's a blast to drive and is a marvel of packaging -- but based on past experiences I ironically just don't fit in the Fit. Knowing that I didn't have to amass great distances this weekend, I grabbed the key to see if a little more seat time would change my impression. While it still doesn't provide nearly enough 6-foot-3-friendly space, it was a little better than I remembered it... I wouldn't want to drive to Vermont in the thing, but around town, I was comfortable enough.

In fact, after driving our new long-term Honda Civic GX, I found that I was more comfortable in the Fit. The bigger Civic's leg room is pretty bad too, but the Fit's higher seat cushion gives it a slight tall-dude advantage. I couldn't possibly buy either car, but it's good to know that I don't have to so readily dismiss the Fit for a night.

James Riswick, Associate Editor @ 16,558 miles

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2007 Honda Fit Sport: Business Class

July 16, 2007

In a variety of earlier posts, we've written highly about the Honda Fit's versatile seat configurations. One can fold the 60/40-split rear seat completely flat, for instance, or raise the rear seat cushions to create a taller area for carrying bulky items.

Well, here's another neat trick: If you move the front seats all the way forward and then fully recline their seatbacks, the seatbacks touch flush with the rear seat cushions to create a rear-seat recliner. Unless your inseam goes past 50 inches, you'll have plenty of legroom...

The rear seatbacks recline for additional comfort, and there's a cupholder in the door for your cool, delicious beverage.

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2007 Honda Fit Sport: Pound for pound, the most practical car in our fleet

January 02, 2007

Laundry and a major cleanup project in my apartment took up much of the holiday weekend. Mundane stuff, sure, but my days weren't at all unpleasant and our Honda Fit had a lot to do with that. With few exceptions, this is the perfect city car for me. Not only does it fit anywhere I care to park it, it has rear seats that can fold down or up -- and this makes all the difference...

I love the fact that the seats fold up (like in a pickup) and I left them in that position all weekend. This setup provided a more secure hold for transporting bags of laundry (which tend to topple over when seats are folded down). It was also useful for hauling sorted bags of plastics and paper to the recycling plant.

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Honda Fit - The Anti-SUV

December 18, 2006

I have had the altogether pleasant opportunity to drive our 2007 Honda Fit Sport the last few days. The Fit is classified as a subcompact, which in real-world terms, means really really really small. Lilliputian, if you will. But inside it's actually quite large. I'm a big fella, 6'1 and about 205 pounds, and I had plenty of room and GOBS of headroom as well... As usual, I had a rehearsal/gigs while driving the Fit, so I was tasked with photographing it with all my gear inside.

As you can see, it fit perfectly. With the backseats folded flat, the keyboard laid flat. Mind you, this keyboard has 88 full-size keys. It's larger than some members of our editorial staff. I had to move the front passenger seat all the way forward, but Saturday night, with my girlfriend in that seat, I simply turned the keyboard so it was on its side and lying diagonally, front right to back left. The amp and assorted stands fit without a problem. I could have easily added a drum kit as well.

The point is, the Fit is a very roomy little car. It's fairly quick, handles great, even looks kinda stylish for what it is. And since it's so tiny, it's very easy to park anywhere. For a frugal couple in the city (roughly $15,000 out the door) with even two children, there's more than enough room. Groceries? No prob. Christmas tree. Piece of cake. Even a touch of performance. At one point, I looked down at the speedometer and I was going well above the legal limit and totally unaware of it. Not in a Cadillac. But in a Honda Fit with 15-inch wheels. Smooth. Tight. OK, didn't really like the very-upright-like-a-bus-driver seating position. But that's a minor gripe. Is it worthy of great passion and reams of praise? No. But it sets out to do a mission and in my opinion, does it perfectly.

Doug Lloyd, Copy Editor

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2007 Honda Fit Sport: Winning Over the Claustrophobic

November 21, 2006

I really liked this car, surprisingly enough. I thought it was going to be claustrophobic since it looks so small from the outside and that the materials would be cheapy but I was pleasantly surprised. The materials are actually a better quality than what one would expect from a $15K car. Love that leather-wrapped steering wheel...

And even though the Sport model has 109 horsepower, with the five-speed manual, I was able to get around Corollas that didn't know any better. (Actually a lot of drivers who didn't know any better. Fun!)

My friend who is in the market for a new, economical car was intrigued by all the features present in our long-termer at such a low price -- cruise control, aux input and keyless entry are all standard. After spending a weekend in it as the passenger she ended up looking it up on our site, wanting to buy one herself.

But what impressed me most was when I had to do a bit of grocery shopping at Costco for a large housewarming party, the Fit easily stored the grocery bags, two 20-pound bags of ice, beer, etc. with room to spare. I'm sure if I had even more to lug, the folding rear seat would have accommodated that. Too bad that the cargo area didn't come with a cover, though.

Production Editor Caroline Pardilla, 2,188 miles

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They all Fit

November 13, 2006

Over the weekend I had the opportunity to let one of my large friends drive our long-term Honda Fit around a parking lot. Normally this wouldn't be a big deal, but this particular friend is 6'6" tall and the Fit is a subcompact. It was an opportunity for humor, or so I thought.

Not so...

Not only did Gigantor squeeze into the Fit, he was perfectly comfortable. This photo of 6'1" vehicle testing assistant Mike Schmidt proves the Fit's roominess. The cell phone is there for scale and shows that there's at least 3 inches of remaining headroom.

Cool.

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