2013 Ford Mustang V6 vs. 2013 Hyundai Genesis Coupe Comparison Test

  • Full Review
  • Pricing & Specs
  • Road Tests (1)
  • Comparison (1)
  • Long-Term

2013 Ford Mustang coupe

(3.7L V6 6-speed Manual)
  • 2013 Ford Mustang V6 vs. 2013 Hyundai Genesis Coupe Track Test Video

    Battle of the Refreshed Middleweights…

    1st Place: 2013 Hyundai Genesis Coupe Quick, rewarding at speed and strikingly styled, the Genesis Coupe is a lot of car for the money.

    2nd Place: 2013 Ford Mustang V6 More practical and familiar, with ample performance. Best minor-league Mustang ever.
    Leave a comment below and tell us your pick. | May 25, 2012

1 Video , 92 Photos

  • Comparison Test
  • 2013 Hyundai Genesis Coupe Specs and Performance
  • 2013 Ford Mustang Specs and Performance

"Is that a GT 5.0?"

"Nope. It's a V6," we said. And then, as if we had just filled his gas tank with fairy dust, Mustang guy turned around, looked at the ground and walked away. No words. No smile. He just left.

Ford's V6 Mustang, you see, isn't an aspirational car. Never has been. People wind up in the paltry pony car as a hand-me-down or settle on it when desirability and prudence collide. And, as this gas station encounter proves, it's still saddled with the weight of that reputation.

But it shouldn't be.

Coupe Clash
In 2011 everything changed for the Mustang V6. The insertion of a modern 305-horsepower V6 under the hood, a 29-mpg highway rating from the EPA and a functional performance package began a profound transformation. The addition of revised styling and some interior tweaks this year redeemed the 2013 Ford Mustang V6 even further. It's now a real contender in the sparsely populated $30,000 sport coupe segment. It's taken some time, but the minor-league Mustang is undeniably interesting.

So much so that it bears comparing to the 2013 Hyundai Genesis Coupe, a car that not long ago — and with 42 fewer horses — toppled the far more costly Infiniti G37 Coupe in a battle of value and performance. For 2013, the Genesis Coupe further increases its value proposition with a revised powertrain and new styling.

The Value Equation
Speaking of character, Ford calls the paint color on this 2013 Mustang V6 Premium "Gotta Have It Green." It's a polarizing hue but it attracted Mustang guy like a gold digger to the Facebook IPO. It also cost $495 and is one of four options on this test car. Also present are the $1,995 Performance package, $695 reverse sensing system and Security package and $650 Comfort package. In total, Ford asks $30,830 for this Mustang.

For that sum you get the aforementioned 3.7-liter, 305-hp V6, which churns out 280 pound-feet of torque at 4,250 rpm on 87-octane fuel. Also present are a real limited-slip differential (no brake differential here, thank you) and 19-inch wheels wrapped in 255/40 Pirelli P Zero summer tires.

At $33,875 the 2013 Hyundai Genesis Coupe 3.8 Track offers similar hardware without any options. Standard equipment includes 19-inch wheels and Bridgestone Potenza rubber. A Torsen limited-slip differential and four-piston front and rear Brembo brakes are standard.

The Genesis Coupe 3.8 Track comes with Hyundai's updated-for-2013 3.8-liter V6 which is now good for 348 hp and 295 lb-ft of torque on 91-octane fuel. Power and torque are diminished by 4 hp and 3 lb-ft on 87 octane fuel.

Get In. Drive
Settle in, find a rhythm and it won't take long to discover that the Genesis is both the quicker and more dedicated tool for dissecting any road. Largely, this is down to its more sophisticated suspension, stronger power plant and lower stance.

The speed difference, however, isn't as substantial as the chasm that emerges in our confidence during aggressive driving. Drive both cars over the same road at the same pace and you'll come away from the Genesis far less aware of your own mortality. Its better damping and body control are a blessing. And if the going gets even remotely rough, the Mustang's axle begins to show itself for what it is: heavy and old.

Set the Mustang's adjustable steering weight to Sport and steering effort is similar in both cars. We don't love the steering feel in either car, but response in the Genesis is quicker and more intuitive. There's less urgency just off-center and a better sense of control when probing the limits of its chassis.

Work the upper reaches of the tachometer and there's no ignoring the Korean coupe's 43-hp advantage. Despite its peak torque arriving a few hundred rpm higher in the rev range, the Genesis leaves slow corners with more punch. More importantly, it encourages hard driving rather than merely tolerating it. If you're buying one of these cars for back roads, pick the Genesis.

Data Dump
These impressions manifest themselves in our instrumented tests, where the 2013 Hyundai Genesis Coupe also produces better numbers. Its 68.5-mph slalom speed is a full 2.4 mph faster (68.5 mph vs. 66.1 mph) than the Mustang, which protests with awkward transitional response on the less-than-smooth course. Lateral acceleration is nearly a wash, but again the Genesis ekes out a slight advantage despite its smaller tires (0.88g vs. 0.87g).

When it comes to getting down the road, the 2013 Ford Mustang V6 is quick, but its 5.7-second run (5.4 seconds using a 1-foot rollout as on a drag strip) to 60 mph is a few clicks behind the Genesis Coupe's 5.4-second time (5.1 seconds with rollout). The gap narrows some at the quarter-mile, where the Genesis produces a 13.8-second pass at 102.0 mph to the Mustang's 14.0-second run at 100.3 mph.

Braking performance, though, falls easily in the Mustang's favor, which is ironic considering the hardware that's stopping both of these cars. With 13.4-inch front rotors and fixed four-piston Brembo calipers, the 3,533-pound Genesis should easily provide more thermal capacity and better brake feel. But it's the 3,526-pound Mustang's 12.4-inch rotors and two-piston sliding calipers that produced better pedal feel and consistency.

Only 2 feet separate the coupes' 60-0 stopping distances (112 feet Mustang, 114 feet Genesis), but after five consecutive stops, the Genesis showed significant pedal fade, which never materialized after six stops in the Mustang.

Daily Living, Daily Driving
Reality says that practical matters will weigh into the purchase decision of any buyer shopping this segment. And it's here that the Mustang's ease of use and practical shape give it an advantage. Simple things that any automaker should get right are mostly right in the Mustang.

Its electronic throttle is honest, its clutch take-up is consistent and intuitive and its brake feel is surprisingly good. The Mustang offers upright seating, a bigger greenhouse, more rear-seat headroom and a bigger trunk than its Korean competitor. What's more, its split-folding rear seats provide better usability than the Genesis' single-folding seat.

The Mustang feels bigger than the Genesis and in every dimension except wheelbase, it is. This, of course, means the Mustang has longer overhangs, which you can feel every time you corner this pony. But it's also a straightforward machine to operate. It moves away from a stop with ease, steers with more precision than most American cars and embraces drivers who don't concern themselves with rigorous apex clipping. There's value here not because it's simple, but because it's easy.

The Genesis, in contrast, demands your constant attention. Its neediness is a product of an unnatural throttle calibration, which requires thoughtful clutch/throttle work, millimeter-precise pedal movements and perfect timing. And that's not what we want every time we go to the store. In fact, this car lacks the performance to merit such attention, especially considering the number of quicker machines that don't come with those compromises.

Consider the Inside
Each car's character is as conspicuous from the driver seat as it is from the outside. Waistlines, in both cases, are high — at least for those of us who aren't tall in the torso. But the Mustang's muscle car roots mean a more traditional packaging of controls and instruments set at right angles to the driver. The Genesis envelops its driver in a GT-style cockpit where most controls and gauges are driver-focused. Hyundai's coupe is more contemporary, but Ford does a good job of modernizing the Mustang's retro theme into full functionality.

The Hyundai's seats are narrower, harder and provide more lateral support, yet they're not so firm as to punish one's backside on long drives. Both cars offer heated front seats.

Ford and Hyundai have demonstrated solid progress in material and assembly quality in the last five years, and the evidence is on display in both cars. Each offers an interior finish on par with its price. Accordingly, noise at 70 mph is nearly identical between the two.

The Take-Away
When it comes to the qualities we think are most important in this class — character, speed and value — the Genesis Coupe wins. Certainly, its drivability quirks are annoying, but they are limitations we'd work around in exchange for its strengths.

Even so, the 2013 Ford Mustang V6 is a solid choice. There's value in its practicality and ease of use that the Hyundai can't match. Plus, it's still reasonably quick. And if you're not concerned with performance minutia, then it might feel just as fast. At the very least, it's deserving of a second look even if it doesn't have the "5.0" badge on the side.

But the strengths of the 2013 Hyundai Genesis Coupe are many: a superior powertrain, better suspension, more rewarding at-the-limit behavior, and — in our eyes — better looks. Also, the 3.8 Track trim level comes with Hyundai's intuitive touchscreen Nav Traffic system, keyless entry/start and automatic climate control. So, yes, you'll pay more, but you'll also get more. And in this fight, getting more wins every time.

The manufacturers provided Edmunds these vehicles for the purposes of evaluation.

Vehicle
Model year2013
MakeHyundai
ModelGenesis Coupe
Style3.8 Track 2dr Coupe (3.8L 6cyl 6M)
Vehicle TypeRWD 2dr 4-passenger Coupe
Base MSRP$33,875
Options on test vehicleNone
As-tested MSRP$33,875
Assembly locationUlsan, South Korea
North American parts content (%)5
Drivetrain
ConfigurationLongitudinal front engine, rear-wheel drive
Engine typeNaturally aspirated, direct-injected V6, gasoline
Displacement (cc/cu-in)3,778/231
Block/head materialAluminum/aluminum
ValvetrainDouble overhead camshaft, four valves per cylinder, variable intake + exhaust valve timing
Compression ratio (x:1)11.5
Redline, indicated (rpm)6,750
Fuel cutoff/rev limiter (rpm)7,000
Horsepower (hp @ rpm)348 @ 6,400
Torque (lb-ft @ rpm)295 @ 5,300
Fuel type87 octane + 91 octane for best performance (348 hp/295 lb-ft)
Transmission typeSix-speed manual
Transmission ratios (x:1)I=3.848, II=2.317, III=1.623, IV=1.233, V=1.0, VI=0.794
Final-drive ratio (x:1)3.727
Differential(s)Torsen limited-slip
Chassis
Suspension, frontMacPherson strut with double ball joint, coil springs, stabilizer bar
Suspension, rearMultilink, monotube dampers, coil springs, stabilizer bar
Steering typeSpeed-proportional power steering
Steering ratio (x:1)14.9
Tire make and modelBridgestone Potenza RE050A
Tire typePerformance front and rear
Tire size, front225/40R19 (89Y)
Tire size, rear245/40R19 (94Y)
Wheel size19-by-8 inches front -- 19-by-8.5 inches rear
Wheel materialPainted alloy
Brakes, front13.4-inch ventilated steel disc with four-piston fixed calipers
Brakes, rear13-inch ventilated steel disc with four-piston fixed calipers
Track Test Results
Acceleration, 0-30 mph (sec.)2.3
0-45 mph (sec.)3.7
0-60 mph (sec.)5.4
0-75 mph (sec.)7.9
1/4-mile (sec. @ mph)13.8 @ 102.0
0-60 with 1 foot of rollout (sec.)5.1
0-30 mph, trac ON (sec.)2.6
0-45 mph, trac ON (sec.)4.5
0-60 mph, trac ON (sec.)6.2
0-75 mph, trac ON (sec.)8.9
1/4-mile, trac ON (sec. @ mph)14.4 @ 101.0
0-60, trac ON with 1 foot of rollout (sec.)6.0
Braking, 30-0 mph (ft.)29
60-0 mph (ft.)114
Slalom, 6 x 100 ft. (mph)68.5
Slalom, 6 x 100 ft. (mph) ESC ON67.0
Skid pad, 200-ft. diameter (lateral g)0.88
Skid pad, 200-ft. diameter (lateral g) ESC ON0.85
Sound level @ idle (dB)41.8
@ Full throttle (dB)87.0
@ 70 mph cruise (dB)66.3
Engine speed @ 70 mph (rpm)2,500
Test Driver Ratings & Comments
Acceleration commentsBest launch at about 3,500 rpm. Clutch out quick without bog to achieve quickest getaway. Some wheelspin through 1st. Shifter not confidence-inspiring. Not enough information through inconsistently engaging clutch pedal. 1-2 shift always met with grind. Some self-protection still built into throttle calibration. Possible clutch damper, too.
Braking comments1st stop = best stop. All subsequent stops longer. Real pedal fade by fifth stop.
Handling commentsSkid pad: Well-defined and comfortably approachable limits. Easily balances on mild oversteer. Rewarding because there's ample power to influence chassis and good control. Slalom: Well-behaved and quick. Easy to drive but hard to sense where edges of body are in order to place it precisely. Textbook RWD. No bad habits. Much better than Mustang in this test.
Testing Conditions
Test date5/8/2012
Test locationCalifornia Speedway
Elevation (ft.)1,120
Temperature (°F)67.6
Relative humidity (%)59.2
Barometric pressure (in. Hg)28.7
Wind (mph, direction)8.9 headwind
Odometer (mi.)4,098
Fuel used for test91 octane
As-tested tire pressures, f/r (psi)35/35
Fuel Consumption
EPA fuel economy (mpg)18 city/27 highway/21 combined
Fuel tank capacity (U.S. gal.)17.2
Driving range (mi.)464.4
Audio and Advanced Technology
Stereo description360-watt Infinity 10-speaker AM/FM/SiriusXM/HD Radio/MP3 CD audio system
iPod/digital media compatibilityUSB + aux jack
Satellite radioStandard SiriusXM with 90-day trial
Hard-drive music storage capacity (Gb)8
Bluetooth phone connectivityStandard
Navigation systemStandard 7-inch with XM Nav Traffic with 90-day trial
Telematics (OnStar, etc.)BlueLink standard
Smart entry/StartStandard
Parking aidsOptional parking sonar rear
Dimensions & Capacities
Curb weight, mfr. claim (lbs.)3,433
Curb weight, as tested (lbs.)3,533
Weight distribution, as tested, f/r (%)55/45
Length (in.)182.3
Width (in.)73.4
Height (in.)54.5
Wheelbase (in.)111.0
Track, front (in.)63.0
Track, rear (in.)63.6
Turning circle (ft.)37.4
Legroom, front (in.)44.1
Legroom, rear (in.)30.3
Headroom, front (in.)39.2
Headroom, rear (in.)34.6
Shoulder room, front (in.)56.7
Shoulder room, rear (in.)52.8
Seating capacity4
Trunk volume (cu-ft)10
GVWR (lbs.)4,343
Ground clearance (in.)5.1
Warranty
Bumper-to-bumper5 years/60,000 miles
Powertrain10 years/100,000 miles
Corrosion7 years/Unlimited miles
Roadside assistance5 years/Unlimited miles
Vehicle
Model year2013
MakeFord
ModelMustang
StyleV6 Premium 2dr Coupe (3.7L 6cyl 6M)
Vehicle TypeRWD 2dr 4-passenger Coupe
Base MSRP$26,995
Options on test vehicleGotta Have It Green Metallic Tri-Coat ($495), V6 Performance Package ($1,995 -- includes strut-tower brace, upsized front sway bar and SVT rear sway bar, unique front springs, unique front and rear calipers, 19-by-8.5-inch Foundry Black painted machined-aluminum wheels, P255/40R19Z 96W Summer-only tires, unique stability control calibration, gloss black side mirrors, 3.31 limited-slip rear axle, tire mobility kit [replaces mini spare tire], unique engine cover on V6 Premium); Reverse Sensing System and Security Package ($695 -- includes reverse-sensing system, active anti-theft system, wheel locking kit); Comfort Group ($650 -- includes six-way power passenger seat, heated front seats, heated side mirrors with Pony projection lights).
As-tested MSRP$30,830
Assembly locationFlat Rock, Michigan
Drivetrain
ConfigurationLongitudinal, front-engine, rear-wheel drive
Engine typeNaturally aspirated, port-injected V6, gasoline
Displacement (cc/cu-in)3,731/228
Block/head materialAluminum/aluminum
ValvetrainDouble overhead camshaft, four valves per cylinder, variable intake + exhaust valve timing
Compression ratio (x:1)10.5
Redline, indicated (rpm)6,750
Fuel cutoff/rev limiter (rpm)7,000
Horsepower (hp @ rpm)305 @ 6,500
Torque (lb-ft @ rpm)280 @ 4,250
Fuel type91 octane
Transmission typeSix-speed manual
Transmission ratios (x:1)I=4.23,II=2.53, III=1.66, IV=1.23, V=1.0,VI=0.70
Final-drive ratio (x:1)3.31
Differential(s)Limited-slip
Chassis
Suspension, frontMacPherson struts, coil springs, stabilizer bar
Suspension, rearSolid live axle with panhard bar and two trailing links, coil springs, stabilizer bar
Steering typeElectric speed-proportional power steering
Steering ratio (x:1)15.7
Tire make and modelPirelli P Zero
Tire typeAll-season front and rear
Tire size, frontP255/40ZR19
Tire size, rearP255/40ZR19
Wheel size19-by-8.5 inches front and rear
Wheel materialPainted alloy
Brakes, front12.4-inch one-piece ventilated steel discs with 2-piston sliding calipers
Brakes, rear11.8-inch one-piece ventilated steel discs with single-piston sliding calipers
Track Test Results
Acceleration, 0-30 mph (sec.)2.2
0-45 mph (sec.)3.8
0-60 mph (sec.)5.7
0-75 mph (sec.)8.3
1/4-mile (sec. @ mph)14.0 @ 100.3
0-60 with 1 foot of rollout (sec.)5.4
0-30 mph, trac ON (sec.)2.4
0-45 mph, trac ON (sec.)4.2
0-60 mph, trac ON (sec.)6.1
0-75 mph, trac ON (sec.)9.0
1/4-mile, trac ON (sec. @ mph)14.4 @ 98.0
0-60, trac ON with 1 foot of rollout (sec.)5.8
Braking, 30-0 mph (ft.)27
60-0 mph (ft.)112
Slalom, 6 x 100 ft. (mph)66.1
Slalom, 6 x 100 ft. (mph) ESC ON63.0
Skid pad, 200-ft. diameter (lateral g)0.87
Skid pad, 200-ft. diameter (lateral g) ESC ON0.86
Sound level @ idle (dB)44.5
@ Full throttle (dB)80.0
@ 70 mph cruise (dB)66.9
Engine speed @ 70 mph (rpm)2,000
Test Driver Ratings & Comments
Acceleration commentsLots of pitch off the line makes it feel as if the engine is really doing something when it's actually just lifting the front end. Easy to launch and shift. Almost makes the quarter-mile in 3rd gear.
Braking commentsSolid, consistent pedal. Linear effort = linear response. Short distance, no fade. A testament to tuning basic braking components well.
Handling commentsSkid pad: Lots of understeer relative to Genesis. Not as willing to rotate or balance on the throttle as easily as Genesis. Fun, still, but not as refined. Slalom: Very aware of axle's presence during this test. "Unwinding" of suspension/axle (unsprung weight returning uncontrolled) produced a few rodeo moments when trying hard on this uneven surface.
Testing Conditions
Test date5/8/2012
Test locationCalifornia Speedway
Elevation (ft.)1,121
Temperature (°F)72.1
Relative humidity (%)48.4
Barometric pressure (in. Hg)28.7
Wind (mph, direction)7.0 headwind
Odometer (mi.)3,484
Fuel used for test91 octane
As-tested tire pressures, f/r (psi)35/35
Fuel Consumption
EPA fuel economy (mpg)19 city/29 highway/22 combined
Edmunds observed (mpg)17.1
Fuel tank capacity (U.S. gal.)16.0
Driving range (mi.)464
Audio and Advanced Technology
Stereo description370-watt, 8-speaker AM/FM/single CD/MP3 Shaker Audio system
iPod/digital media compatibilityStandard iPod via USB jack and aux jack
Satellite radioStandard -- 6 months SiriusXM provided
Bluetooth phone connectivityStandard
Parking aidsOptional parking sonar rear
Dimensions & Capacities
Curb weight, mfr. claim (lbs.)3,501
Curb weight, as tested (lbs.)3,526
Weight distribution, as tested, f/r (%)54/46
Length (in.)188.1
Width (in.)73.9
Height (in.)55.6
Wheelbase (in.)107.1
Track, front (in.)62.3
Track, rear (in.)62.9
Turning circle (ft.)33.4
Legroom, front (in.)42.4
Legroom, rear (in.)29.8
Headroom, front (in.)38.5
Headroom, rear (in.)34.7
Shoulder room, front (in.)55.3
Shoulder room, rear (in.)51.6
Seating capacity4
Trunk volume (cu-ft)13.4
Warranty
Bumper-to-bumper3 years/36,000 miles
Powertrain5 years/60,000 miles
Corrosion5 years/Unlimited miles
Roadside assistance5 years/60,000 miles
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Edmunds Insurance Estimator

The Edmunds TCO® estimated monthly insurance payment for a 2013 Ford Mustang in WA is:

$215 per month*
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