New Dodge Journey Review

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Dodge showed up late to the midsize crossover SUV segment, finally entering the marketplace with the Dodge Journey. But the company that created the minivan has some party tricks of its own. Dodge has a proven track record of creating vehicles that can quickly transform from people mover to cargo hauler with minimal fuss. Add to that Dodge's characteristically muscular exterior styling treatment, and you have two factors that can help the Journey stand out in a crowded room.

The Journey features an in-betweener size that straddles the compact and midsize crossover segments. It offers cargo and passenger room similar to that of larger compact SUVs, but like a midsize model, offers a more substantial feel and an available third-row seat. As such, the Journey strikes an interesting blend of utility and comfort for families. Unfortunately, early Journeys fell well short of most rivals, particularly in regards to driving dynamics and interior refinement. Major improvements made to the Journey a few years after its debut have rectified most of the model's past ills, but in general, this Dodge lacks the general overall refinement of newer competitors.

Current Dodge Journey
The Dodge Journey is offered in five trim levels: American Value Package (AVP), SE, SXT, Limited and R/T. The entry-level AVP, SE and SXT models come standard with a rather weak 2.4-liter four-cylinder engine rated at 173 horsepower, mated to a four-speed automatic transmission. Acceleration is sluggish and fuel economy is subpar, so we highly recommend going with the 3.6-liter V6 (optional on the SXT and standard on the Limited and R/T). Its fuel economy and acceleration are mediocre at best, but it can at least get the Journey moving with some authority. A six-speed automatic transmission with manual shift control is standard, as is front-wheel drive. All-wheel drive is offered as an option.

Even the entry-level AVP and SE trims come very well equipped, with notable features including dual-zone manual climate control, keyless ignition/entry, a sliding and reclining second-row seat, a touchscreen audio interface and USB/iPod connectivity.

As is typical for this class, there is an abundance of luxury and convenience features available by stepping up to one of the upper trim levels. These include power front seats, leather upholstery, heated seats, automatic climate control, Bluetooth, a navigation system and premium audio. Parents and kids alike should appreciate the available built-in child booster seats and DVD entertainment system.

Unlike the first few model years of the Journey, this equipment comes packed into an attractive interior with nice materials and solid construction. There are also myriad storage solutions that increase appeal, with containers that double as coolers and an innovative hidden compartment under the front passenger seat cushion. In terms of space, the Journey's first two rows offer comfort and versatility. The third row is very short on legroom and suitable for small children only, but is nevertheless a rare feature for SUVs of this size. Cargo space is roughly on par with the larger compact crossovers.

As we've noted in reviews, the Dodge Journey has impressed us with its flexible seating and smooth ride. But the base four-cylinder engine is underpowered and lacks any significant fuel savings. The V6 is the engine to get, but in general, the Journey is one of the oldest crossovers on the market and is greatly overshadowed by newer competitors.

Read the most recent 2015 Dodge Journey review.

If you are looking for older years, visit our used Dodge Journey page.

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