2012 Chevrolet Corvette Z06 Centennial Edition vs. 2013 Nissan GT-R Premium Comparison Test

2012 Chevrolet Corvette Z06

(7.0L V8 6-speed Manual)
  • 2012 Chevrolet Corvette Z06 vs. 2013 Nissan GT-R

    It's quickly becoming a classic battle. Chevrolet Corvette versus Nissan GT-R. An all-American, rear-wheel-drive, manually shifted V8 brute versus an all-wheel-drive Japanese technology tank with twin turbos and a dual-clutch transmission. Inside Line's Road Test Editor Mike Monticello headed to the Streets of Willow Springs to do a proper comparison on the 1.8-mile road course north of Los Angeles. | January 30, 2012

2 Videos , 77 Photos

  • Comparison Test
  • 2012 Chevrolet Corvette Specs and Performance
  • 2013 Nissan GT-R Specs and Performance

It's quickly becoming a classic battle. Chevrolet Corvette versus Nissan GT-R. An all-American, rear-wheel-drive, manually shifted V8 brute versus an all-wheel-drive Japanese technology tank with twin turbos and a dual-clutch transmission.

We've witnessed this match-up before, most notably in 2008 when we pitted the 480-horsepower GT-R against the 638-hp Corvette ZR1. The Corvette proved the winner in that shoot-out, completely wowing us with its brash, tire-smoking horsepower and impressive track performance.

But much has happened since then. The GT-R has seen multiple improvements, culminating in the 2013 Nissan GT-R Premium with an astonishing 545 hp and a more lively suspension. That's right. Nissan's wundercar has discovered oversteer.

Standing for the red, white and blue this time around is the 2012 Chevrolet Corvette Z06, which is one of the purest Vettes ever created. Our Centennial Edition test car features Brembo carbon-ceramic brakes, Magnetic Ride Control suspension and Performance Traction Management; the last a torque-limiting traction control that manages spark, fuel and throttle at five different levels of intervention (previously only available on the ZR1). In other words, the beast of a Corvette has been tamed by technology.

This battle royal of two sports-car tyrants began at our test track, flowed out onto public roads and ended on a private road course where all their talents could be fully explored. Here's how it went down.

Sticker Shock
Since the Nissan GT-R's release five years ago, one of the selling points of the car has always been its relative bargain price compared with other supercars. Nissan can kiss that advantage good-bye, as the base Premium model now starts at $97,820 (including $1,000 destination), a $6,870 increase over the outgoing model. Our pre-production test car's only option — Super Silver paint — added $3,000, for an as-tested price of $100,820.

The 2012 Z06 starts at a more reasonable $76,500, but our test car was loaded with an astonishing $25,260 in options including the $8,815 3LZ Premium Equipment Group (heated sport seats with power-adjustable bolsters, navigation, premium stereo, Bluetooth); the $7,500 Z06 Ultimate Performance package (Brembo carbon-ceramic brakes, Michelin Pilot Sport Cup tires); the $4,950 Centennial Special Edition package (special paint, badges, wheels, Magnetic Ride Control); and a $3,995 carbon-fiber package for a sticker-shock-inducing out-the-door price of $101,760.

Explosion of Propulsion
For 2013 Nissan upped the GT-R's power once again. Last year it had 530 horsepower, but now it's up to 545 hp at 6,400 rpm. There's also an extra 15 pound-feet of torque for a total of 463 lb-ft thanks to an increase in intake efficiency and larger ducting for the intercoolers. The six-speed dual-clutch transmission has been updated with a stiffer shift fork arm and a stronger fixing bearing for the flywheel housing in the interest of quieter and smoother operation. Yes, it still has its 4,000-rpm launch control.

The 2012 Corvette Z06 doesn't bother with weenie tack-ons like turbos or intercoolers. Instead, it makes its prodigious power, all 505 hp at 6,300 rpm and 470 lb-ft of torque at 4,800, the old-fashioned way — with 7.0 liters of displacement and pushrods. Not that the hand-assembled LS7 V8 is completely old-tech. It has titanium intake valves, titanium connecting rods and a dry-sump oil system, not to mention a two-mode muffler system that is thunderous heaven on earth when the butterflies open up under full throttle.

Grabbing Hold
The GT-R's ability to get out of the hole quickly is well documented, with most of the credit going to its ATTESA E-TS all-wheel drive and launch control. After a few finicky launch attempts, in which our GT-R didn't seem to be producing full power, all systems eventually clicked and the GT-R went into a grin-inducing four-tire-spinning launch, ripping to 60 mph in 3.1 seconds (2.9 seconds with a 1-foot rollout as on a drag strip).

It continued on until it ripped the quarter-mile in 11.1 seconds at 123.3 mph. Easy? You bet. As simple as releasing the brake and keeping the throttle mashed. It even takes care of the lightning-quick shifts for you.

The Z06, on the other hand, requires some actual driver skill. We tried Chevy's launch control, but found that it wasn't as adept at controlling wheelspin as a human. We also found the six-speed manual has reasonably short and defined gates, but the 2-3 shift proved balky if we weren't deliberate.

The rear-drive Z06 simply can't leave the line with the tenacity of the GT-R. Still, zero to 60 mph in 3.8 seconds (3.5 seconds with rollout) isn't something to scoff at, nor is romping through the quarter in 11.7 seconds at 122.3 mph. And unlike the GT-R, which sounds about as good as your wife's Hoover, the Z06's rip-snorting V8 is one of the most sonorous delights you'll ever hear from a driver seat.

Twisty Terrors
Both cars feature state-of-the-art driver-adjustable suspension systems, the Z06's Magnetic Ride Control constantly adjusting to road conditions and doing a pretty decent job of curbing the dreaded Corvette Bounce over large bumps.

Nissan engineers tweaked the GT-R's suspension setup yet again (it's a yearly affair), with slightly stiffer spring rates and new bypass valves for the shocks. The car's structure around the engine bay and dash panel was reinforced as well.

The GT-R has always been a slalom stalwart, and that hasn't changed for 2013. It slithered around our little orange cones with an artful precision at 73.7 mph, including some entertaining power-on oversteer around the final cone.

The Z06 isn't a slouch when it comes to juking left and right, either. We were mightily impressed by the level of grip and control offered by the ultra-sticky Michelin Pilot Sport Cup tires (which admittedly need some heat to work properly). It corners flat and the steering has a natural ratio, despite a heavy effort. And in a nod to the ability of Performance Traction Management, we went quicker — 74.7 mph — in PTM-3 (which makes use of the stability control) than we did with all nanny systems switched off. But even with ESC off it still wasn't an oversteering beast, instead proving driver-friendly and filled with feedback, chalking up a 74.4-mph run.

Out on the Road
Hop in the GT-R and you're struck by how infinitely more modern and pleasing the interior is to use and look at than the Vette. There are lots of different textures, almost all of them soft-touch, while the Vette's center stack and controls just leave us cold. The GT-R also has a more upright seating position with a clearer view of the road ahead, while in the Vette you sit low and rearward.

GM did address one area of the Corvette's interior for 2012, though, and you probably better sit down for this one: The Corvette now has real seats with actual lateral support (even power-adjustable bolsters) and grippy microfiber inserts. No more flopping around through corners. Yet they're still comfy. In fact, we prefer these buckets over the GT-R's seats, which are too narrow and force you to sit more on the seat cushion bolsters than ensconced between them.

The GT-R is the more "normal" car of the two, more upright, more easily accessible and even has a rear seat, as useless as it may be for normal-size adults. Yet even with the cockpit-adjustable Bilstein DampTronic shocks set to full Comfort, the GT-R has a rock-hard ride. In contrast, the Vette's Tour mode could almost be described as plush. But the Z06's annoyingly low front airdam nearly scrapes Botts' dots, while its 285-width front tires follow every single pavement irregularity, sometimes nearly ripping the steering wheel out of your hands.

Track Attack
You can't do a proper comparison of two such track-worthy cars without actually taking them to a track. Well, you could, but it would be pointless. So it was on to Streets of Willow, a 1.8-mile road course north of Los Angeles. It's tight and ultra-twisty, yet both of these rockets achieved nearly 115 mph down the back straight.

The GT-R was up first. And what strikes you about Nissan's wundercar is how quickly it lets you get up to speed — and confidence is king around a race course. It's not just the all-wheel drive and the paddle-shift transmission either, as the GT-R's general demeanor is one of driver-friendliness. All of its systems are more intent on helping you go fast around a track, rather than a desire to send you off the track backward like some big-bore exotics.

That being said, this is also the most inspiring GT-R we've ever driven, as the extra power and edgier suspension tuning have made the 2013 Nissan GT-R livelier than ever, with a new willingness to rotate under drop-throttle conditions. And with 545 hp on tap, there's now true ability to steer the GT-R out of corners with the throttle, with power-on oversteer. The GT-R's new attitude not only makes it considerably more fun than previous GT-Rs, but also devastatingly quick. And even though it has a 3.7-inch-longer wheelbase, is 7.5 inches longer overall and is packing an extra 642 pounds over the Vette, the GT-R actually feels smaller and more of one piece. Its best lap time was a 1:23.8.

Romping out of the pits in the Z06 is a completely different sensation. It's a cacophony inside the cockpit as the 7.0-liter beast grunts, bellows and rips out a glorious V8 tune. You're shifting manually (although with its tall gearing, you shift less in the Vette), heel-and-toeing, real driving. The near-illegal Michelins take time to heat up, but with each lap we learn to trust their grip more.

Since it was chilly — about 50 degrees Fahrenheit — we ran the Z06 in PTM-4 (Chevy recommends PTM-5 for above 60 degrees F). The goal with PTM is to be able to mash the throttle pedal at or before corner apex and then let the system manage the car's torque for you. But the system only works if there is grip for the tires, and it will let you spin out since stability control is switched off in PTM-4 and 5. Because of the cool temperatures, we didn't fully trust the system enough to just mash the throttle like a goon at every corner.

The Z06 is thrilling beyond all imagination as it thunders from turn to turn, making up time on the GT-R under braking due to the confidence of those carbon-ceramic brakes and the grip from the tires. Brake fade was never an issue with the Z06, while the GT-R's pedal got slightly spongy on its final hot laps. And when the Vette did break its tires loose, it was in a more linear fashion than the violent nature of the GT-R's tires. When we checked the time sheet, the Corvette's best lap time was 1:22.7.

Godzilla or King Kong?
The 2012 Chevrolet Corvette Z06 and 2013 Nissan GT-R proved spectacular on both track and twisty back roads, and both are better than they've ever been. Nissan's engineers have built more driver involvement and fun into the GT-R. No sane person would call it boring these days, and it's no longer simple to drive at its limits.

The Z06 surprised us with just how planted it was. We're used to Z06s roasting rear tires, but PTM has greatly quelled the car's desire to do so on track, even with that ferocious V8. Yep, the Z06 — with PTM, Magnetic Ride Control and carbon-ceramic brakes — has bridged the technology gap that the GT-R once lorded over.

And even though the GT-R is the more livable car — filling-rattling suspension notwithstanding — on a daily basis, the fact is we want the Corvette Z06. It comes down to driver involvement. A true manual transmission, rear-wheel drive for on-demand burnouts and powerslides, and that always-magnificent-sounding lump of an engine. And, let's face it, the Centennial Edition looks hot.

The Nissan GT-R is an amazing car and we respect it for what it can do, but it only really becomes thrilling when being pushed at eight-tenths or higher, a realm we rarely find ourselves in. The Corvette Z06 not only rules the track, it makes driving to the grocery store exciting. For $100,000, we would want both.

The manufacturers provided Edmunds these vehicles for the purposes of evaluation.

Vehicle
Model year2012
MakeChevrolet
ModelCorvette
Year Make Model2012 Chevrolet Corvette Z06 2dr Coupe (7.0L 8cyl 6M)
Vehicle TypeRWD 2dr 2-passenger Coupe
Base MSRP$76,500
Options on test vehicleCarbon Flash Metallic; Z06 Premium Equipment Group ($8,815 -- includes cargo net; luggage shade; Universal Home Remote transmitter; Bluetooth phone connectivity with specific steering-wheel controls; power telescoping steering column with manual tilt; memory package; multilevel heated sport front bucket seats with perforated leather seating surfaces, adjustable lumbar, side bolsters, embroidery and contrasting stitching; Bose premium nine-speaker audio system with an additional 9 months of SiriusXM Satellite Radio service (1 year total); AM/FM stereo with CD player, MP3 playback, DVD-based touchscreen navigation, USB port, auxiliary input jack, 6.5-inch LCD color display and voice recognition; power-adjustable lumbar support and side bolsters; six-way power passenger seat; custom leather-wrapped interior package including leather-wrapped upper instrument panel, upper door trim panels and console storage cover, enhanced armrest padding and special gunmetal pattern console trim plate); Z06 Ultimate Performance Package ($7,500 -- includes ceramic brakes; black lightweight aluminum wheels, 19-by-10-inch front and 20-by-12-inch rear; Michelin Pilot Sport Cup tires; enhanced cooling; Performance Traction Management; black painted full-width spoiler), Centennial Special Edition ($4,950 -- includes Carbon Flash Metallic exterior color; 19-by-10-inch front and 20-by-12-inch rear black Centennial wheels with red stripe; Magnetic Selective Ride Control with Tour and Sport modes; P285/30ZR19 front and P335/25ZR20 rear Michelin PS2 run-flat tires), Z06 Carbon Fiber Package ($3,995 -- includes black painted carbon-fiber roof, rockers, splitter and body-color ZR1-style spoiler).
As-tested MSRP$101,760
Assembly locationBowling Green, Kentucky
North American parts content (%)75
Drivetrain
ConfigurationLongitudinal, front-engine, rear-wheel drive
Engine typeNaturally aspirated, port-injected V8, gasoline
Displacement (cc/cu-in)7,008/427
Block/head materialAluminum/aluminum
ValvetrainPushrod, 2 valves per cylinder
Compression ratio (x:1)11.0
Redline, indicated (rpm)7,000
Horsepower (hp @ rpm)505 @ 6,300
Torque (lb-ft @ rpm)470 @ 4,800
Fuel typePremium unleaded (required)
Transmission typeSix-speed manual
Transmission ratios (x:1)I = 2.66; II = 1.78; III = 1.30; IV = 1.00; V = 0.74; VI = 0.50; R = 2.90
Final-drive ratio (x:1)3.42
Differential(s)Limited-slip rear differential
Chassis
Suspension, frontIndependent double-wishbones, leaf springs, driver-adjustable two-mode magnetorheological dampers, stabilizer bar
Suspension, rearIndependent double-wishbones, leaf springs, driver-adjustable two-mode magnetorheological dampers, stabilizer bar
Steering typeHydraulic-assist, speed-proportional rack-and-pinion power steering
Steering ratio (x:1)17.2, variable
Tire make and modelMichelin Pilot Sport Cup
Tire typeAsymmetrical summer, high-performance, run-flat (30 psi cold front; 30 psi cold rear)
Tire size, frontP285/30ZR19 (87Y)
Tire size, rearP335/25ZR20 (94Y)
Wheel size, front19-by-10 inches
Wheel size, rear20-by-12 inches
Wheel materialCast aluminum
Brakes, front15.5-inch ventilated cross-drilled carbon-ceramic discs with six-piston fixed calipers
Brakes, rear15-inch ventilated cross-drilled carbon-ceramic discs with four-piston fixed calipers
Track Test Results
Acceleration, 0-30 mph (sec.)1.9
0-45 mph (sec.)2.8
0-60 mph (sec.)3.8
0-75 mph (sec.)5.3
1/4-mile (sec. @ mph)11.7 @ 122.3
0-60 with 1 foot of rollout (sec.)3.5
0-30 mph, trac ON (sec.)2.1
0-45 mph, trac ON (sec.)2.9
0-60 mph, trac ON (sec.)4.0
0-75 mph, trac ON (sec.)5.4
1/4-mile, trac ON (sec. @ mph)11.9 @ 122.8
0-60, trac ON with 1 foot of rollout (sec.)3.6
Braking, 30-0 mph (ft.)25
60-0 mph (ft.)106
Slalom, 6 x 100 ft. (mph)74.4
Slalom, 6 x 100 ft. (mph) ESC ON74.7
Skid pad, 200-ft. diameter (lateral g)1.09
Skid pad, 200-ft. diameter (lateral g) ESC ON1.10
Road course lap time (sec.)1:22.7
Sound level @ idle (dB)56.0
@ Full throttle (dB)90.0
@ 70 mph cruise (dB)73.2
Engine speed @ 70 mph (rpm)1,500
Test Driver Ratings & Comments
Acceleration commentsQuickest time came with a 3,200-rpm launch with more axle hop than wheelspin. Sixty mph comes right at the 1-2 shift. Chevy's Launch Control proved a couple tenths slower than our human tester's right foot control because LC allows too much wheelspin. You have to be deliberate with the 2-3 shift, as it doesn't like to be rushed. 7.0-liter V8 sounds phenomenal.
Braking commentsVery firm pedal. Utterly stable with no side-to-side wiggling. Brakes and tires took a few runs to heat up so they could work at optimum. First stop was 113 feet. Shortest stop was sixth (out of 7) at 106 feet. Longest was third stop at 116 feet.
Handling commentsSkid pad: Fantastic grip: This car just sticks and sticks. Heavy steering but good feedback. Just a little bit of throttle adjustment is all it takes to keep the Z06 on the arc. Slalom: The level of grip from the front tires is truly amazing. It took a couple of runs to heat the tires up before we could trust that they would in fact stick. Corners very flat. Steering has a natural ratio, not too quick or too slow. Effort is on the heavy side, which is just fine. ESC on runs were done in PTM-3, but the intervention point is very high and we actually went just ever so slightly quicker than with all systems off.
Testing Conditions
Test date12/14/2011
Test locationCalifornia Speedway
Elevation (ft.)1,121
Temperature (F)56.4
Relative humidity (%)50.4
Barometric pressure (in. Hg)29.1
Wind (mph, direction)3.0, Crosswind
Odometer (mi.)2,220
Fuel used for test91-octane gasoline
As-tested tire pressures, f/r (psi)30/30
Fuel Consumption
EPA fuel economy (mpg)15 city/24 highway/18 combined
Edmunds observed (mpg)10.7 worst/16.6 best/12.4 average (over 299 miles)
Fuel tank capacity (U.S. gal.)18.0
Driving range (mi.)432
Audio and Advanced Technology
Stereo descriptionAM/FM/CD/MP3 Bose premium audio system with nine speakers
iPod/digital media compatibilityStandard Generic aux jack and USB port
Satellite radioStandard SiriusXM with one-year trial subscription
Hard-drive music storage capacity (Gb)Not available
Bluetooth phone connectivityStandard
Navigation systemStandard DVD with 6.5-inch display screen
Telematics (OnStar, etc.)Standard
Smart entry/StartStandard ignition and doors
Parking aidsNot available
Blind-spot detectionNot available
Adaptive cruise controlNot available
Lane-departure monitoringNot available
Collision warning/avoidanceNot available
Night VisionNot available
Dimensions & Capacities
Curb weight, mfr. claim (lbs.)3,199
Curb weight, as tested (lbs.)3,250
Weight distribution, as tested, f/r (%)51/49
Length (in.)175.6
Width (in.)75.9
Height (in.)48.7
Wheelbase (in.)105.7
Track, front (in.)63.5
Track, rear (in.)62.5
Turning circle (ft.)39
Legroom, front (in.)43
Headroom, front (in.)38
Shoulder room, front (in.)55
Seating capacity2
Step-in height, measured (in.)12.5
Trunk volume (cu-ft)22
Cargo loading height, measured (in.)37.8
GVWR (lbs.)3,663
Ground clearance (in.)4.8
Warranty
Bumper-to-bumper3 years/36,000 miles
Powertrain5 years/100,000 miles
Corrosion6 years/100,000 miles
Roadside assistance5 years/100,000 miles
Vehicle
Model year2013
MakeNissan
ModelGT-R
Year Make Model2013 Nissan GT-R Premium 2dr Coupe AWD (3.8L 6cyl Turbo 6AM)
Vehicle TypeAWD 2dr 4-passenger Coupe
Base MSRP$97,820
Options on test vehicleSuper Silver Paint ($3,000)
As-tested MSRP$100,820
Assembly locationTochigi, Japan
Drivetrain
ConfigurationLongitudinal, front-engine, all-wheel drive
Engine typeTwin-turbocharged, port-injected V6, gasoline
Displacement (cc/cu-in)3,839/234
Block/head materialAluminum/aluminum
ValvetrainDOHC, 4 valves per cylinder, variable intake + exhaust-valve timing
Compression ratio (x:1)9.0
Redline, indicated (rpm)7,000
Fuel cutoff/rev limiter (rpm)7,000
Horsepower (hp @ rpm)545 @ 6,400
Torque (lb-ft @ rpm)463 @ 3,200-5,800
Fuel typePremium unleaded (recommended)
Transmission typeSix-speed auto-double-clutch manual and column-mounted paddles with sport/competition modes
Transmission ratios (x:1)I = 4.06; II = 2.30; III = 1.60; IV = 1.25; V = 1.00; VI = 0.80; R = 3.38
Final-drive ratio (x:1)Front: 2.94, Rear: 3.70
Differential(s)Front: open; Center: multiplate electronically contolled clutch with variable torque split; Rear: 1.5-way clutch type
Chassis
Suspension, frontIndependent double wishbones, coil springs, driver-adjustable three-mode variable dampers, stabilizer bar
Suspension, rearIndependent multilink, coil springs, driver-adjustable three-mode variable dampers, stabilizer bar
Steering typeSpeed-proportional, rack-and-pinion power steering
Steering ratio (x:1)15.0
Tire make and modelDunlop SP Sport Maxx GT600 DSST CTT
Tire typeAsymmetrical summer, performance (29 psi cold front; 29 psi cold rear)
Tire size, front255/40ZRF20 (97Y)
Tire size, rear285/35ZRF20 (97Y)
Wheel size, front20-by-9.5 inches
Wheel size, rear20-by-10.5 inches
Wheel materialForged aluminum
Brakes, front15.4-inch two-piece ventilated cross-drilled discs with six-piston fixed calipers
Brakes, rear15-inch two-piece ventilated cross-drilled discs with four-piston fixed calipers
Track Test Results
Acceleration, 0-30 mph (sec.)1.3
0-45 mph (sec.)2.0
0-60 mph (sec.)3.1
0-75 mph (sec.)4.4
1/4-mile (sec. @ mph)11.1 @ 123.3
0-60 with 1 foot of rollout (sec.)2.9
0-30 mph, trac ON (sec.)2.3
0-45 mph, trac ON (sec.)3.2
0-60 mph, trac ON (sec.)4.3
0-75 mph, trac ON (sec.)5.7
1/4-mile, trac ON (sec. @ mph)12.1 @ 122.1
0-60, trac ON with 1 foot of rollout (sec.)3.9
Braking, 30-0 mph (ft.)26
60-0 mph (ft.)106
Slalom, 6 x 100 ft. (mph)73.7
Slalom, 6 x 100 ft. (mph) ESC ON73.7
Skid pad, 200-ft. diameter (lateral g)0.99
Skid pad, 200-ft. diameter (lateral g) ESC ON1.01
Sound level @ idle (dB)51.0
@ Full throttle (dB)81.7
@ 70 mph cruise (dB)71.3
Engine speed @ 70 mph (rpm)2,500
Test Driver Ratings & Comments
Acceleration commentsFast but finicky. Was inexplicably slow for the first four or five launches, even with the 4,000-rpm launch control engaged. And then suddenly on the seventh attempt, it launched properly, with full power and all four tires spinning. Quickest run was in transmission "A" setting, letting the computer make the super-fast upshifts itself. Manual shifting is via steering-column-mounted paddles. Holds gears to rev limiter. Blips throttle on downshifts.
Braking commentsErratic stopping distances, but incredibly stable and secure. Pedal is firm, but I expected it would be even firmer. First stop was 111 feet. Best stop was 6th (out of 7) at 106 feet. Worst was third stop at 113 feet.
Handling commentsSkid pad: Lots and lots of grip here. Odd that clockwise direction was ever so slightly quicker than counter-clockwise, both with ESC off and ESC on. Modulating the throttle didn't do a whole lot to alter the GT-R's attitude. Slalom: Downright amazing around the cones. Quick, precise steering and lots of grip. Very confidence-inspiring, and not as on edge as most cars that can achieve nearly 74 mph. Getting on the throttle early around the second-to-last cone would bring the tail out nicely, even with the all-wheel drive. "R" VDC mode, which allows some ESC intervention, proved just as quick as with everything turned off.
Testing Conditions
Test date12/14/2011
Test locationCalifornia Speedway
Elevation (ft.)1,121
Temperature (F)55.06
Relative humidity (%)53.5
Barometric pressure (in. Hg)29.15
Wind (mph, direction)2.25, crosswind
Odometer (mi.)3,433
Fuel used for test91-octane gasoline
As-tested tire pressures, f/r (psi)29/29
Fuel Consumption
EPA fuel economy (mpg)16 city/23 highway/19 combined mpg (est.)
Edmunds observed (mpg)17.5 worst/18.1 best/17.8 average
Fuel tank capacity (U.S. gal.)19.5
Driving range (mi.)448.5
Audio and Advanced Technology
Stereo descriptionEleven-speaker Bose audio system with two subwoofers
iPod/digital media compatibilityStandard iPod via USB jack
Satellite radioStandard XM
Hard-drive music storage capacity (Gb)Standard 9.3GB music storage capacity
Rear seat video and entertainmentNot available
Bluetooth phone connectivityStandard
Navigation systemStandard with traffic/weather and 7-inch display screen
Smart entry/StartStandard ignition doors
Parking aidsStandard back-up camera
Blind-spot detectionNot available
Adaptive cruise controlNot available
Lane-departure monitoringNot available
Collision warning/avoidanceNot available
Night VisionNot available
Dimensions & Capacities
Curb weight, mfr. claim (lbs.)3,829
Curb weight, as tested (lbs.)3,892
Weight distribution, as tested, f/r (%)55/45
Length (in.)183.1
Width (in.)74.9
Height (in.)54.0
Wheelbase (in.)109.4
Track, front (in.)62.6
Track, rear (in.)63.0
Turning circle (ft.)36.6
Legroom, front (in.)44.6
Legroom, rear (in.)26.4
Headroom, front (in.)38.1
Headroom, rear (in.)33.5
Shoulder room, front (in.)54.3
Shoulder room, rear (in.)50.0
Seating capacity4
Step-in height, measured (in.)14.4
Trunk volume (cu-ft)8.8
Cargo loading height, measured (in.)35.3
GVWR (lbs.)4,669
Warranty
Bumper-to-bumper3 years/36,000 miles
Powertrain5 years/60,000 miles
Corrosion5 years
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Edmunds Insurance Estimator

The Edmunds TCO® estimated monthly insurance payment for a 2012 Chevrolet Corvette in VA is:

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