2014 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray vs. 2013 SRT Viper

2014 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray Coupe

(6.2L V8 7-speed Manual)
  • 2014 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray vs. 2013 SRT Viper Track Test

    Edmunds.com takes both the Corvette Stingray and SRT Viper to the track for performance tests - 0-60 launches, quarter mile times, braking distances, slalom runs & skip pad ratings. Leave a comment below and tell us which one you'd rather drive. | August 27, 2013

1 Video , 66 Photos

Back to the Battlefield With New Weapons

  • Comparison Test
  • 2014 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray Specs and Performance
  • 2013 SRT Viper Specs and Performance

This is the latest barbaric and bloody battle in a merciless, ongoing 22-year war. This time it's fought on the street and the racetrack with broadswords — that's 13 gears, 18 cylinders, 888 cubic inches and 1,100 horses. It's Corvette vs. Viper. Again.

Best. War. Ever.
After a three-year lapse, the SRT Viper was recently revived and so new that it wasn't even a Dodge anymore. Then there's the 2014 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray: the C7 that represents the most radical advance in the car's 61 years. It's an even greater leap forward than the '63 "C2" Stingray. On sheer ability these are two of the most capable sports cars ever built anywhere at any time.

Chevy Corvette Stingray vs SRT Viper

But this isn't a completely fair fight. The Viper's 8.4-liter V10 makes 640 horsepower, while the Corvette's new LT1 6.2-liter V8 is rated at "only" 460 horses. It's at a major torque deficit, too, with a mere 465 pound-feet to the Viper's 600. Beyond that, the Viper's monstrous 295/30ZR18 front and vast 355/30ZR19 rear Pirelli P Zero tires make the Corvette's 245/35ZR19 front and 285/30ZR20 rear run-flat Michelin Pilot Super Sports seem puny. Physics and simple logic says the car with more power and a lot more tire should perform much better.

Then there's the bottom line. Our well-optioned Corvette coupe with the Z51 package is considerably less expensive at $69,375 than this base model, no-options $101,990 Viper. And price always matters.

Ultimately the Viper will be more directly comparable to the "big-tire" Corvettes that are surely coming: the imminent C7-based successors to the track-oriented Z06 and overwhelming, supercharged ZR1. Of course, then there's always the top-of-the-line Viper GTS like the one we tested late last year.

OK, but so what? That's then and this is right now. And right now, we've got a binary choice: either this Corvette or this Viper.

Character Counts
The Viper's doors are small, the seats narrow, and to get in you have to vault over the side exhaust. Once inside, you must stretch back out to reach the door and haul it closed. Adjust the seat, mirrors, pedals and steering wheel. All you see in front of you are thick, sensuous front fenders rising from the clamshell hood and a slice of horizon. You see less out the back. Ergonomically, the Viper makes you earn it. But it doesn't matter.

Chevy Corvette Stingray vs SRT Viper

Press the start button in the Viper and the engine throbs into its odd, pulsing and rocking V10 idle. The whole car seems to squeeze down and start trying to push the blood in your body out through your ears and eyes. This isn't merely a car, it's a life-altering event. It's riveting and there is nothing else like it in the automotive universe.

It's a different story with the C7. It's easy to get into the new Corvette and the door closes with a solid thump. That alone is enough evidence to convince anyone that this is the most robust Corvette ever built. In fact, it's so structurally stiff that it could match a Porsche 911 atom for atom. The dashboard makes sense and the visibility out across the carbon-fiber hood is good, with the razor-flared fender tops adding a dose of drama and Stingray heritage. The rearward view is cramped and the cockpit is narrow, but this is a real car. Go to Target and there's room in back to carry stuff home.

The C7's start button is a weird parallelogram that looks like a smoothed-down Lego piece. Your finger can hardly feel that button as it's pressing it, but the LT1 whirrs to life and settles into a muffled, reassuring and very mellow idle while the dash ignites and the tach needle bounces to life. This isn't high drama; it's Tom Brady-style confidence rendered in aluminum, carbon fiber, plastic and LED displays.

During development the Chrysler and GM engineers were aiming at very different, very specific things with these cars. And all that is apparent even before anyone puts them into gear.

Rocket Science
Back in the '60s it took skilled operators like "Dyno" Don Nicholson or Ronnie "Mr. Four-Speed" Sox to get a manual-transmission car down a quarter-mile strip efficiently. In the new Corvette and Viper there are computers to do the job. But those logic circuits don't necessarily do the best job.

Chevy Corvette Stingray vs SRT Viper

"Launch control did a good job of regulating wheel spin," reported Edmunds.com's test-driver about the seven-speed manual-equipped Corvette's acceleration. "Yet it hardly made a difference from a data perspective. It made for a near-bog, no-wheelspin run and I still beat it by a couple tenths with the traction control turned off." So when doing it ourselves, and despite short gearing that forces a 1-2 shift before 60 mph, the C7 blitzed to 60 mph in only 4.3 seconds (4.1 seconds with 1 foot of rollout). By historic standards, that's super quick. And previous tests of pre-production C7s have had that down as low as 3.8 seconds. The quarter-mile was fully consumed in 12.4 seconds at 113.7 mph.

Launch control is also part of the Viper's feature set, but its effectiveness was also conditional. "The Viper's launch control is just a rolling burnout button," noted our test-driver. "The car was quicker to 60 with the traction control on because it could reach that speed in 1st gear. With the traction control off, I was surprised at the revs needed to overcome the grip of the rear tires and finally found 4,300 rpm to be about right for a smooth launch."

The new Viper's shifter has shorter throws than previous editions, but the Tremec six-speed it tops still needs a firm hand to get the most from it. The Corvette's seven-speed is slick and instinctive, while the Viper's six-cog box demands muscle and concentration. The 'Vette is easier, but the Viper is more effective under an expert's spur.

All that in mind, the Viper is starship fast. The 0-60 clocks in at 3.7 seconds (3.5 with rollout) and the quarter-mile screams by in only 11.7 seconds at a mind-blowing 124.1 mph.

Brute Electronic Persuasion
The high-compression (11.5:1) LT1 V8 in the Corvette is exceptionally flexible; it revs more quickly and easily than any previous Corvette engine. There's a certain puppy dog eagerness to the LT1 that's ingratiating, as if all that matters to it is that it's making you happy. But it's the super trick electronic limited-slip differential that comes as part of the Z51 package that enables all that flexibility to work so effectively.

With the "Magnetic Selective Ride Control" set to "Track, Sport 2" the Stingray was utterly devastating in the slalom. The steering isn't just precise, it's crystalline in its reportage. For a car on modest run-flat tires the 73.5-mph slalom speed is astonishing. In fact, it was fully 1.5 mph faster than the Viper. This is technology making a car's handling much, much better. Contemplating this Corvette's slalom performance on stickier, larger rubber is mind-boggling.

Chevy Corvette Stingray vs SRT Viper

That same technological edge shows up on the skid pad, where the Stingray orbited at a nonchalant 1.05g compared to the Viper's big-drama 1.01g. Throw in brakes that haul the 'Vette down from 60 mph in only 99 feet compared to the Viper's 110 feet and heading on to the road course at Willow Springs, it wasn't clear which car would be the most effective on the track at all.

The Viper was going to have to work to beat the 'Vette on the road course.

Work That Pays
Few things are more rewarding than hustling a Viper around a track quickly. It's a full-immersion experience: a task that demands every iota of a driver's attention. Let your attention wander and the car will break traction and start heading into the wilderness.

"The massive speed means braking in places where I wouldn't in other cars," relayed Senior Editor Josh Jacquot about the Viper's laps at Willow Springs. "It requires many laps to come to terms with its communication, expectations and absolute limits. In the end, feeling completely comfortable comes down to complete trust. And I don't completely trust the Viper the way I do the 'Vette."

It's the vice-free nature of the Stingray's handling that is such a revelation. "It's fast, it makes the right sounds and it turns, stops and goes like crazy," said Jacquot as he stepped from the 'Vette. "It's predictable, reliable and world-class in every way."

The best laps in the Corvette were achieved with the Performance Traction Management (PTM) system in "Race" mode. This maximizes the delivery of torque to the pavement and extracts yaw control. The car feels as if it's nailing itself to the track; you don't feel the car oversteer or understeer as much as you feel the car fighting against them. "PTM is the best thing about this car," Jacquot enthused. "Though it will make you lazy as a driver, it hardly diminishes the reward of driving hard. It's extremely easy to sense the limits and drive right to them."

Keeping in mind that the Corvette gives up 180 hp to the Viper and runs tires that are 50-mm narrower in front and 70-mm narrower in the rear, it's no surprise that the Chevy's lap times were behind that of the Viper. And the Viper was scandalously quick, making it around the 1.6-mile Streets of Willow course in a stunning 1 minute, 23.9 seconds. It's a ripper.

What is staggering is that despite its physical deficiencies, the Corvette hustled around with a best lap time of 1 minute, 24.6 seconds. That's only 0.7 second slower per lap. It may not be a victory for the Corvette, but it's a stunning performance.

Street Thug vs. Boy Scout
There are thousands of engineers around the world working diligently to ensure that their cars don't feel like a Viper. On the street, the Viper throbs and rocks noticeably at every stop light. Its ride is stiff and transmits every pebble on the road straight to your coccyx; the steering is heavy and the pedals take a firm push to operate. Throw in the ergonomic challenges of ingress/egress, the scant outward visibility, the sheer noise from the massive explosions occurring in the engine bay and the almost nonexistent cargo space and the result sounds like misery.

Chevy Corvette Stingray vs SRT Viper

But the Viper is actually oddly wonderful on the street. This isn't the sort of car you take through the drive-through or to Home Depot to pick up bathroom fixtures. Sure, you can drive it every day if you really want to, but this is a special event car; every time it's on the road it's a one-car parade. It's a car that feels alive from the heft of the shifter to the heat from its side exhaust. This car doesn't take you for a ride, it demands you pay attention and get involved in the driving experience. You want cushy comfort, buy a Charger. It's right next to the Viper on the showroom floor.

Then there's the new Corvette Stingray, a two-seater that doesn't scrimp on comfort. It's quiet but makes a great sound when the engine is working. Pick the right suspension setting and it rides over freeways better than some Cadillacs, and what is ferociously precise steering on track mellows into easygoing operation during commutes. In some significant ways (suspension compliance and steering feel in particular) the Corvette is easier to live with than a Malibu. It's that easy and that good.

Living With Reality
Because of its much lower price, manners that are easy to live with in daily use and still astonishing performance, the Corvette takes a narrow win here. It is the one car you can drive comfortably every day and still use to dominate a track day. Built around an impregnable structure, overstuffed with technology that actually improves the driving experience, and so easygoing you can commute in it with one finger on the wheel, it's this year's great leap forward for the entire breed of sports cars.

That, however, shouldn't tarnish the glory the SRT Viper deserves. Every moment in this car is special; it always makes a dramatic entrance and attracts crowds as if it had just arrived from Titan. As we drove this white Viper out of a hotel parking lot, an attendant said, "Man, that thing is like a white Batmobile." Stuff like that doesn't happen in a Corvette.

The manufacturer provided Edmunds this vehicle for the purposes of evaluation.

Vehicle
Model year2014 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray
Year Make Model2014 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray Z51 2dr Coupe (6.2L 8cyl 7M)
Vehicle TypeRWD 2dr 2-passenger coupe
Base MSRP$54,795
Options on test vehicleBlade Silver Metallic, Custom Sill Plates With Stingray Logo, Preferred Equipment Group ($8,005 -- includes standard equipment; Bose advanced 10-speaker system with bass box; HD Radio with additional 9 months of Sirius/XM Satellite Radio service (1 year total); Memory Package with recall for 2 driver "presets" for 8-way power seat, outside mirrors and tilt-and-telescoping steering column; frameless, auto-dimming inside rearview mirror; Universal Home Remote with garage door opener and three programmable channels (located on driver visor); heated and ventilated driver and passenger seats with power bolster and lumbar; head-up display with color readouts for street mode, track mode with g-meter, vehicle speed, engine rpm; cargo net and luggage shade; theft -deterrent system for body content security and unauthorized electrical entry; body-color, heated, power-adjustable outside mirrors with driver-side auto-dimming; navigation with 3D maps; premium leather-wrapped leather instrument panel, center console and door panels; perforated napa leather seating surfaces), Visible Carbon-Fiber Roof Panel ($1,995 -- includes removable, visible carbon-fiber roof panel with body-color surround), Magnetic Selective Ride Control ($1,795 -- includes Magnetic Selective Ride Control; Performance Traction Management), Dual-Mode Performance Exhaust ($1,195 -- includes dual-mode performance exhaust with additional horsepower, aggressive exhaust sound and 4-inch polished stainless-steel tips ), Carbon-Fiber Interior Appearance Package ($995 -- includes carbon-fiber instrument panel trim), MyLink Navigation System ($795), Carbon Flash-Painted Rear Spoiler and Outside Mirrors ($100)
As-tested MSRP$69,675
Assembly locationBowling Green, Kentucky
North American parts content (%)100
Drivetrain
ConfigurationLongitudinal, front midengine, rear-wheel drive
Engine typeNaturally aspirated, direct-injected V8, gasoline with cylinder deactivation
Displacement (cc/cu-in)6,162cc (376 cu-in)
Block/head materialAluminum/aluminum
ValvetrainPushrod, 2 valves per cylinder, variable intake + exhaust-valve timing
Compression ratio (x:1)11.5
Redline, indicated (rpm)6,500
Horsepower (hp @ rpm)460 @ 6,000
Torque (lb-ft @ rpm)465 @ 4,600
Fuel typePremium unleaded (recommended)
Transmission typeSeven-speed manual with automated rev-matching
Transmission ratios (x:1)I=2.97, II=2.07, III=1.43, IV=1.0, V=0.71, VI=0.57, VII=0.48
Final-drive ratio (x:1)3.42
Differential(s)Electronically controlled clutch-type limited slip
Chassis
Suspension, frontIndependent double wishbones, transverse leaf spring, self-adjusting magnetorheological dampers, stabilizer bar
Suspension, rearIndependent double wishbones, transverse leaf spring, self-adjusting magnetorheological dampers, stabilizer bar
Steering typeElectric-assist, speed-proportional, variable-ratio rack-and-pinion
Steering ratio (x:1)17:1 to 12:1
Tire make and modelMichelin Pilot Super Sport ZP
Tire typeAsymmetrical, high-performance summer performance
Tire size, frontP245/35ZR19 89Y
Tire size, rearP285/30ZR20 95Y
Wheel size, front19-by-8.5 inches
Wheel size, rear20-by-10 inches
Wheel materialAluminum
Brakes, front13.6-inch one-piece ventilated slotted cast-iron discs with four-piston fixed calipers
Brakes, rear13.3-inch one-piece ventilated slotted cast-iron discs with four-piston fixed calipers
Track Test Results
Acceleration, 0-30 mph (sec.)1.9
0-45 mph (sec.)2.9
0-60 mph (sec.)4.3
0-75 mph (sec.)6.0
1/4-mile (sec. @ mph)12.39 @ 113.73
0-60 with 1 foot of rollout (sec.)4.1
0-30 mph, trac ON (sec.)2.0
0-45 mph, trac ON (sec.)3.0
0-60 mph, trac ON (sec.)4.4
0-75 mph, trac ON (sec.)6.1
1/4-mile, trac ON (sec. @ mph)12.42 @ 113.96
0-60, trac ON with 1 foot of rollout (sec.)4.1
Braking, 30-0 mph (ft.)25
60-0 mph (ft.)99
Slalom, 6 x 100 ft. (mph)73.5
Slalom, 6 x 100 ft. (mph) ESC ON70.9
Skid pad, 200-ft. diameter (lateral g)1.05
Skid pad, 200-ft. diameter (lateral g) ESC ON1.00
Road course lap time (sec.)84.55
Sound level @ idle (dB)51.8
@ Full throttle (dB)88.8
@ 70 mph cruise (dB)72.2
Engine speed @ 70 mph (rpm)1,500
Test Driver Ratings & Comments
Acceleration commentsLaunch control did a good job of regulating wheelspin, yet it hardly made a difference from a data perspective. A near-bog no-wheelspin run essentially matched it and I beat it by a couple tenths with traction control shut off. I tried various amounts of spin and they all produced shockingly similar and highly consistent results. I did try the no-lift-shift feature and as cool as it is because it's typically forbidden, in reality it is no quicker than my usual shifts. The short gearing forces a 1-2 shift prior to 60 mph and even requires a shift to 4th for the quarter-mile. The Stingray is quick (quicker than C6 base coupe), sounds glorious, but it falls short of OMG-fast. I guess that's what a Z06 and ZR1 will be for.
Braking commentsInitially firm pedal feel ends with a little squish at the end of its short travel. The shortest stopping distance occurred on the seventh stop, proving these brakes have plenty of thermal capacity. Straight, steady, no drama.
Handling commentsSlalom: After I had dialed in the mode(s) that best suited my preferred feedback and the demands of slalom test (Track, Sport 2), then it became a matter of chipping away at the times with subtle techniques that exploited the car's electronic aids as well as the limits. It's easy to discover the limits and either avoid them or step right over them and file it in the manifest of things the Stingray does or doesn't want to do. I especially appreciated the crystal-clear and highly precise steering, the zippy turn-in, the progressive break-away of the tires and the sophisticated traction control on exit that doesn't merely chop the throttle, but stutters it to maintain momentum and direction. Although I couldn't hear it (like in the Nissan GT-R), I could sense the diff hard at work sorting out which side of the car needed/wanted power at every moment. Immensely capable and highly accessible performance without the C6's vaguely threatening demeanor. Wow. Skid pad: Absolutely nutty amount of grip for a road (not race) car. Steering remains informative and precise despite the tremendous loads. The Stingray will either under- or oversteer at will, which speaks to its impressive balance. With ESC fully on, the throttle fades out right before the car would need more driver involvement (e.g. steering and/or throttle modulation) to go any quicker. It's likely a "civilian" wouldn't even notice this happening at 1g. Impressive.
Testing Conditions
Test date8/20/2013
Elevation (ft.)1,121
Temperature (F)91
Relative humidity (%)28.00
Barometric pressure (in. Hg)28.81
Wind (mph, direction)3, headwind
Odometer (mi.)1,621
Fuel used for test91 octane
As-tested tire pressures, f/r (psi)30/30
Fuel Consumption
EPA fuel economy (mpg)21 combined/17 city/29 highway
Fuel tank capacity (U.S. gal.)18.5
Driving range (mi.)536.5
Audio and Advanced Technology
Stereo description10-speaker Bose audio system with bass enclosure
iPod/digital media compatibilityGeneric aux jack, multiple iPod via USB (3)
Satellite radioStandard with 1 year of Sirius included
Bluetooth phone connectivityStandard with phone and audio streaming
Navigation systemOptional with traffic, 8-inch display screen (measured diagonally)
Telematics (OnStar, etc.)Standard OnStar
Smart entry/StartStandard ignition/doors/trunk/hatch
Parking aidsStandard rearview camera
Dimensions & Capacities
Curb weight, mfr. claim (lbs.)3,298
Curb weight, as tested (lbs.)3,443
Weight distribution, as tested, f/r (%)49.8/50.2
Length (in.)176.9
Width (in.)73.9
Height (in.)48.8
Wheelbase (in.)106.7
Track, front (in.)62.9
Track, rear (in.)61.7
Legroom, front (in.)43.0
Headroom, front (in.)37.9
Shoulder room, front (in.)55.2
Seating capacity2
Trunk volume (cu-ft)15
Warranty
Bumper-to-bumper3 years/36,000 miles
Powertrain5 years/100,000 miles
Corrosion6 years/100,000 miles
Roadside assistance5 years/100,000 miles
Free scheduled maintenance2 years/24,000 miles
Vehicle
Model year2013 SRT Viper
Year Make Model2013 Dodge SRT Viper 2dr Coupe (8.4L 10cyl 6M)
Vehicle TypeRWD 2dr 2-passenger coupe
Base MSRP$99,390
Options on test vehicleViper White Clear Coat, 21H Quick Order Package ($0 -- includes standard equipment)
As-tested MSRP$101,990
Assembly locationDetroit
North American parts content (%)82
Drivetrain
ConfigurationLongitudinal, front midengine, rear-wheel drive
Engine typeNaturally aspirated, port-injected V10, gasoline
Displacement (cc/cu-in)8,390cc (512 cu-in)
Block/head materialAluminum/aluminum
ValvetrainPushrod, two valves per cylinder, variable exhaust valve timing
Compression ratio (x:1)10.2
Horsepower (hp @ rpm)640 @ 6,200
Torque (lb-ft @ rpm)600 @ 5,000
Fuel typePremium unleaded (required)
Transmission typeSix-speed manual
Transmission ratios (x:1)I=2.26, II=1.58, III=1.19, IV=1.0, V=0.77, VI=0.63
Final-drive ratio (x:1)3.55
Differential(s)Viscous-fluid-actuated clutch-type limited slip
Chassis
Suspension, frontIndependent double wishbones, coil springs, stabilizer bar
Suspension, rearIndependent double wishbones, coil springs, stabilizer bar
Steering typeHydraulically assisted rack-and-pinion
Steering ratio (x:1)16.7
Tire make and modelPirelli P Zero
Tire typeSummer performance front and rear
Tire size, frontP295/30ZR18 (94Y)
Tire size, rearP355/30ZR19 (99Y)
Wheel size, front18-by-10.5 inches
Wheel size, rear19-by-13.0 inches
Wheel materialPolished alloy
Brakes, front14-inch two-piece ventilated steel discs with four-piston fixed calipers
Brakes, rear14-inch two-piece ventilated steel discs with four-piston fixed calipers
Track Test Results
Acceleration, 0-30 mph (sec.)1.8
0-45 mph (sec.)2.8
0-60 mph (sec.)3.7
0-75 mph (sec.)5.2
1/4-mile (sec. @ mph)11.72 @ 124.09
0-60 with 1 foot of rollout (sec.)3.5
0-30 mph, trac ON (sec.)2.4
0-45 mph, trac ON (sec.)3.4
0-60 mph, trac ON (sec.)4.4
0-75 mph, trac ON (sec.)6.1
1/4-mile, trac ON (sec. @ mph)12.38 @ 120.95
0-60, trac ON with 1 foot of rollout (sec.)4.1
Braking, 30-0 mph (ft.)27
60-0 mph (ft.)110
Slalom, 6 x 100 ft. (mph) ESC ON72
Skid pad, 200-ft. diameter (lateral g)0.98
Skid pad, 200-ft. diameter (lateral g) ESC ON1.01
Road course lap time (sec.)83.94
Sound level @ idle (dB)60.8
@ Full throttle (dB)93.3
@ 70 mph cruise (dB)74.1
Engine speed @ 70 mph (rpm)1,950
Test Driver Ratings & Comments
Acceleration commentsThe Viper's so-called launch control is just a silly rolling burnout button. The car was quicker to 60 with traction control on because it could reach 60 in 1st gear. With traction control shut off, I was surprised at the revs it requires to overcome the prodigious grip of the rear tires and finally found 4,300 to be about right for a smooth launch that kept the momentum and revs going forward. With 1st gear being so tall (over 60 mph), I was a little surprised that I needed 4th to make it across the quarter-mile mark. The shifter doesn't feel heavy per se, but it's not what I'd call light and precise. It's still a bit of heavy hardware that requires extra attention to slot it correctly into each gear.
Braking commentsNot sure why the distances are so "long" because the tires are mega, the brakes felt strong and they were obviously fade-free. Rock-hard pedal, very little dive, arrow straight, and zero ABS noise or flutter. The brake and throttle pedals are extremely close to one another, so don't wear boots when driving this car.
Handling commentsSlalom: This car requires the proverbial leap of faith in the slalom. Knowing how much grip there is available and relying on it at over 70 mph are two different things. Because this car is wide, it's hard to spot the cones, and the seat bolsters literally bang off my elbows, it presents more driver challenges than rewards. I was pleased, however, with the suspension's compliance and the tires' progressive break away at the limit, where the rear would gently slide but not in a threatening way. Skid pad: Yep, these tires grip like a gorilla, but it's difficult to spot the painted line on the pavement. At the limit, the ESC was a little quicker than with it off because it can apply brakes individually (unlike me). Steering weight seems a bit excessive and unnecessary. Lighter and with clearer feedback would go a long way to making the car feel a whole lot less ponderous.
Testing Conditions
Test date8/20/2013
Elevation (ft.)1,121
Temperature (F)90.00
Relative humidity (%)29.00
Barometric pressure (in. Hg)28.82
Wind (mph, direction)3, headwind
Odometer (mi.)1,022
Fuel used for test91 octane
As-tested tire pressures, f/r (psi)29/29
Fuel Consumption
EPA fuel economy (mpg)15 combined/12 city/19 highway
Fuel tank capacity (U.S. gal.)16.0
Driving range (mi.)304
Audio and Advanced Technology
Stereo descriptionNine-speaker Harmon Kardon AM/FM/CD player
iPod/digital media compatibilityStandard aux input and iPod via USB input
Satellite radioStandard 1-year Sirius/XM subscription
Bluetooth phone connectivityStandard
Navigation systemOptional
Smart entry/StartStandard keyless entry and ignition
Dimensions & Capacities
Curb weight, mfr. claim (lbs.)3,354
Curb weight, as tested (lbs.)3,380
Weight distribution, as tested, f/r (%)50.4/49.6
Length (in.)175.7
Width (in.)76.4
Height (in.)49.1
Wheelbase (in.)98.8
Track, front (in.)62.9
Track, rear (in.)61.0
Turning circle (ft.)40.5
Legroom, front (in.)42.7
Headroom, front (in.)36.6
Shoulder room, front (in.)53.1
Seating capacity2
Trunk volume (cu-ft)14.7
Ground clearance (in.)5.0
Approach angle (degrees)10.7
Departure angle (degrees)16.1
Warranty
Bumper-to-bumper3 years/36,000 miles
Powertrain5 years/100,000 miles
Corrosion5 years/100,000 miles
Roadside assistance5 years/100,000 miles

Most Recommended Comments

By bryan__t
on 08/28/13
11:43 AM PST

I've got a confession to make. I'm a Porsche guy. From a young age my dad taught me that Vettes were poorly-made pieces of plastic and fiberglass that were generally unworthy. But the new Vette seems awesome and I cannot think of a single objective reason to buy a 911 over this. I hope I am still invited for Thanksgiving dinner...

Recommend  (94) (7)

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By dderosa
on 08/27/13
9:27 PM PST

No, our long-termer will be Lime Rock Green. We just got notice from GM that production is complete and the car is ready for us. -- Donna

Recommend  (45) (5)

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By drjohn43
on 08/28/13
8:50 AM PST

I'll buy the 'Vette and take the $32,315 I saved by not buying the Viper and buy my son a fully loaded VW Golf Autobahn GTI. You guys may not agree with my choice, but he sure will!

Recommend  (44) (20)

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The Edmunds TCO® estimated monthly insurance payment for a 2014 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray in VA is:

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