Track Tested: 2011 Hyundai Equus vs. 2010 Lexus LS 460 Sport


2011 Hyundai Equus vs. 2010 Lexus LS 460 Sport

Edmunds tests hundreds of vehicles a year. Cars, trucks, SUVs, we run them all, and the numbers always tell a story. With that in mind we present "Track Tested," a quick rundown of all the data we collect at the track, along with comments direct from the test-drivers. Enjoy.

Hyundai Equus vs Lexus LS 460. Ten, heck, five years ago, this would've been the start of some sort of gag comparison. "We pit the new Hyundai sedan against a Lexus we found in a river!" And the Lexus, still full of free river carp, would probably walk away with a solid victory.

But that was before the Genesis coupe took shot at the Mazdaspeed 3s and G37s of the world; before the Hyundai Sonata ran to third place in the midsize car sales race; and most importantly, before Hyundai launched the full-size, rear-drive, $60,000 Equus luxury sedan.

The 2011 Hyundai Equus Ultimate has a plush 12-way leather driver seat, rear video screen and climate control, heated and cooled reclining and massaging rear seat and a rear fridge. It's got nav, parking sensors, adaptive headlights and an analogue clock set in the dash.

It's also got a 4.6-liter, 385 horsepower V8, 19-inch wheels and a suspension firming sport mode. Try to tell us the 2011 Hyundai Equus doesn't swim in the same pond as the $76,915 2010 Lexus LS 460 Sport. The Lexus packs a 380 horsepower V8, 19-inch wheels, air springs (as part of the Sport package) and years of buyer confidence as the de facto standard German-alternative luxury car.

So, which will it be? You've read the 2011 Hyundai Equus Full test, and now it's about the test numbers as compared with those of the 2010 Lexus LS 460 Sport.

                                           LS 460 Sport                  Equus
0-30 (sec):                                 2.6                                2.6
0-45 (sec):                                 4.3                                4.5
0-60 (sec):                                 6.4                                6.7
0-75 (sec):                                 9.1                                9.6
1/4 Mile (sec @ mph):           14.5 @ 98.8                   14.8 @ 96.8
0-60 with 1-ft Rollout (sec):         6.1                                6.4
30-0 (ft):                                   29                                 33
60-0 (ft):                                   113                               131
Skid pad lateral accel (g):            0.81                              0.79
Slalom                                      62.6                              63.1

 

 

Vehicle: 2011 Hyundai Equus
Odometer: 1,929
Date: 8/31/2010
Driver: Josh Jacquot
Price: $67,000 (est)


Specifications:
Drive Type: Rear-wheel drive
Transmission Type: 6-speed automatic
Engine Type: 90-degree V8
Displacement (cc/cu-in): 4,627/282
Redline (rpm): 6,750
Horsepower (hp @ rpm): 385 hp @ 6,500 rpm
Torque (lb-ft @ rpm): 333 lb.-ft. @  3,500 rpm
Brake Type (front): Ventilated disc with four-piston fixed calipers
Brake Type (rear): Ventilated disc with one-piston sliding caliper
Steering System: Electric-assist power rack-and-pinion steering
Suspension Type (front): multilink
Suspension Type (rear): multilink
Tire Size (front): P245/45R19
Tire Size (rear): P275/40R19
Tire Brand: Continental
Tire Model: ContiProContact
Tire Type: All season
Wheel size: 19-by-9 inches
Wheel material (front/rear): Chrome alloy
As tested Curb Weight (lb): 4,598


Test Results:
0-30 (sec): 2.6
0-45 (sec): 4.5
0-60 (sec): 6.7
0-75 (sec): 9.6
1/4-Mile (sec @ mph): 14.8 @ 96.8
0-60 with 1-ft Rollout (sec): 6.4
30-0 (ft): 33
60-0 (ft): 131
Slalom (mph): 63.1 (62.4 stability control on)
Skid Pad Lateral acceleration (g): 0.77 (0.79 stability control on)
Db @ Idle: 39.5
Db @ Full Throttle: 72.4
Db @ 70 mph Cruise: 61.4


Acceleration Comments: Wheelspin is nearly impossible so traction "on" and traction "off" are virtually identical -- not certain if this is an indication of modest low-end torque or a non-defeat traction control system. Either way, a total of five runs with various techniques all produced nearly identical results. Upshifts are smooth, but not at all what I would describe as seamless. Also, no measurable difference in Normal or Sport modes. Noticeably quiet, even at wide-open throttle.


Braking Comments: Noticeable dive, but decent rebound damping under full-ABS braking. While the distances are not particularly short, they were remarkably consistent; varying by less than 1 foot over five stops. No measurable differences in Normal or Sport modes.


Handling Comments: Slalom: Good control and a reasonable sense of what's going on but still a very large car and it shows when attempting to change direction quickly -- even in Sport mode. With ESC on intrusion isn't awful -- simple trimming here and there to accomplish what the system thinks the driver wants. NOT Toyota style, which punishes severely. ESC off isn't possible. Even with multiple dash-indicating electronic measures disabled, the Equus still intruded with some intervention as the absolute limits were approached. Skid pad: ESC on: As easy as holding your foot down and steering, the Equus does a good job of achieving its limits without actually being "driven." Turn it off and it's still on with a marginally increased level of control and increased punishment which ultimately serves to thwart any real improvement. Still, there's a real chassis under this car that manages to maintain reasonable manners.

Vehicle: 2010 Lexus LS 460 Sport
Odometer: 585
Date: 11/24/09
Driver: Josh Jacquot
Price: $76,915

Specifications:
Drive Type: Rear-wheel drive
Transmission Type: 8-speed automatic
Engine Type: 90-degree V8
Displacement (cc/cu-in): 4,608/281
Redline (rpm): 6,600
Horsepower (hp @ rpm): 380 hp @ 6,400 rpm
Torque (lb-ft @ rpm): 367 lb.-ft. @ 4,100 rpm
Brake Type (front): Ventilated disc with six-piston fixed caliper (part of sport package)
Brake Type (rear): Ventilated disc with two-piston fixed caliper
Steering System: Electric-assist power rack-and-pinion steering
Suspension Type (front): Independent, multilink, air springs (part of Sport package), stabilizer bar
Suspension Type (rear): Independent, multilink, air springs (part of Sport package), stabilizer bar
Tire Size (front): 245/45R19
Tire Size (rear): 245/45R19
Tire Brand: Dunlop
Tire Model: SP Sport Maxx
Tire Type: Asymmetrical, directional summer tires
Wheel size: 19-by-8 inches
Wheel material (front/rear): Aluminum
As tested Curb Weight (lb): 4,522

Test Results:
0-30 (sec): 2.6
0-45 (sec): 4.3
0-60 (sec): 6.4
0-75 (sec): 9.1
1/4-Mile (sec @ mph): 14.5 @ 98.8
0-60 with 1-ft Rollout (sec): 6.1
30-0 (ft): 29
60-0 (ft): 118
Slalom (mph): 62.6 (61.7 stability control on)
Skid Pad Lateral acceleration (g): 0.80 (0.81 stability control on)
Handling Rating: Good
Db @ Idle: 39.2
Db @ Full Throttle: 65.3
Db @ 70 mph Cruise: 58.2

Acceleration Comments: Very little technique to improve acceleration times. Doesn't really respond to brake torque... just wood it and go. "ECT Power" mode does little to improve times, either. Shifts in "D" come at redline. Minimal wheelspin.

Braking Comments: Brake response feels somewhat isolated from pedal input. Distances, however, are respectable for this 4,500-pound machine.

Handling Comments: Skid pad: Remarkable balance and feedback at the limit. You can easily drive with throttle despite low limits and relatively slow responses. Slalom: Surprisingly, turning stability control off actually means "off." Not much to be gained in doing so in slalom, however. Rear loses grip first, and this is a big car to slide at 65 mph.

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