2014 Chevy Corvette vs. 2012 Porsche 911 Track Test on Edmunds.com
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2014 Chevy Corvette Stingray Z51 vs. 2012 Porsche 911 Carrera S: Track Tested

Chevy vs. Porsche


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Edmunds tests hundreds of vehicles a year. Cars, trucks, SUVs, we run them all, and the numbers always tell a story. With that in mind we present "Edmunds Track Tested," a quick rundown of all the data we collect at the track, along with comments direct from the test drivers. Enjoy.

Chevy Corvette vs. Porsche 911: It's the bench race to end all bench races. Both cars have legendary racing pedigrees and loyal fan bases and both go fantastically fast. How they achieve that speed, however, is vastly different.

The C7 2014 Chevy Corvette Stingray Z51 makes do with a front-mounted, 460-horsepower V8 driving the rear wheels via a seven-speed manual transmission. The 2012 Porsche 911 Carrera S has only 394 hp from its rear-mounted flat-6. As with the Corvette, power goes to the rear via a seven-speed manual. This layout shouldn't work, but Porsche's been perfecting it for 50 years and the 991 generation is the best yet.

Trouble is, the 2014 C7 Corvette is also the best of its lineage and it's about $30,000 less expensive. Does that $30,000 price difference materialize on the track? Let's have a look at the numbers, and don't forget to scroll to the bottom to see how the C7 does against a Porsche 911 Carrera S with the PDK double-clutch transmission.

2014 Chevy Corvette
2012 Porsche 911 Carrera S 7MT
Curb weight as tested:
3,444
3,277
0-30 (sec.):
1.8
1.9
0-45 (sec.):
2.8
3.0
0-60 (sec.):
4.1
4.6
0-60 with 1-ft Rollout (sec.):
3.8
4.4
0-75 (sec.):
5.6
6.3
1/4-mile (sec @ mph):
12.0 @ 117.3
12.7 @ 113.2
30-0 (ft):
23
25
60-0 (ft):
93
102
Skid Pad Lateral Accel (g):
1.08
1.04
Slalom:
72.8
71.3

Vehicle: 2014 Chevy Corvette Stingray Z51
Odometer: 1,102
Driver: Josh Jacquot
Price: $68,175

Specifications:
Drive Type: Front engine, rear-wheel drive
Transmission Type: Seven-speed manual with automated rev-matching
Engine Type: Naturally aspirated, direct-injected pushrod V8, gasoline with cylinder deactivation
Displacement (cc/cu-in): 6,162/376
Redline (rpm): 6,500
Horsepower (hp @ rpm): 460 @ 6,000
Torque (lb-ft @ rpm): 465 @ 4,600
Brake Type (front): 13.6-inch one-piece ventilated slotted cast-iron discs with 4-piston fixed calipers
Brake Type (rear): 13.3-inch one-piece ventilated slotted cast-iron discs with 4-piston fixed calipers
Suspension Type (front): Independent double wishbones, transverse leaf spring, self-adjusting magnetorheological dampers, stabilizer bar
Suspension Type (rear): Independent double wishbones, transverse leaf spring, self-adjusting magnetorheological dampers, stabilizer bar
Tire Size (front): 245/35ZR19 (89Y)
Tire Size (rear): 285/30ZR20 (95Y)
Tire Brand: Michelin
Tire Model: Pilot Super Sport ZP
Tire Type: Asymmetrical, high-performance, summer
As Tested Curb Weight (lb): 3,444

Test Results:

Acceleration
0-30 (sec): 1.8 (2.1 w/ TC on)
0-45 (sec): 2.8 (3.2 w/ TC on)
0-60 (sec): 4.1 (4.7 w/ TC on)
0-60 with 1-ft Rollout (sec): 3.8 (4.4 w/ TC on)
0-75 (sec): 5.6 (6.5 w/ TC on)
1/4-Mile (sec @ mph): 12.0 @ 117.3 (12.7 @ 112.0 w/ TC on)

Braking
30-0 (ft): 23
60-0 (ft): 93

Handling
Slalom (mph): 72.8
Skid Pad Lateral Acceleration (g): 1.08 (1.07 w/ESC on)
RPM @ 70: 1,450

Comments:

Acceleration: Launch control (after several runs) did a respectable job of getting the car off the line but results in heavy wheelspin. A more calculated approach utilizing a 3,800-4,000 rpm engine speed produced the best results. Get the clutch out quickly and let the engine's massive torque push the car forward. Gearchanges are easy, quick and consistent. Engine sound is awesome at wide-open throttle, too.

Braking Some softening of the brake pedal is apparent even during single-stop tests like this. This car (VIN 0026) has likely endured multiple instrumented tests in a few days. Still, the distance (93 feet) is stunning.

Handling:

Skid pad: Very easy to approach and sense the limit of front grip. Precise steering and no body roll provide ample confidence to drive right past the limit of grip. And with excellent balance and a big margin between the limit of grip and the limit of control, doing so is engaging.

Slalom: It's easy to drive the C7 very close to its limits with little practice. Every single run was within 0.35 second. There's probably a quicker slalom speed in the C7, but we ran out of time to refine the best technique. Even so, this car is very, very capable in this test.

Vehicle: 2012 Porsche 911 Carrera S 7MT
Odometer: 3,905
Driver: Chris Walton
Price: $98,900 (base today)

Specifications:
Drive Type: Rear engine, rear-wheel drive
Transmission Type: Seven-speed manual
Engine Type: Naturally aspirated, direct-injected flat-6, gasoline
Displacement (cc/cu-in): 3,800/323
Redline (rpm): 7,500
Horsepower (hp @ rpm): 394 @ 7,400
Torque (lb-ft @ rpm): 325 @ 5,600
Brake Type (front): 13.4-inch ventilated and drilled discs with six-piston fixed calipers
Brake Type (rear): 13.0-inch ventilated and drilled discs with four-piston fixed calipers
Suspension Type (front): Modified MacPherson strut, coil springs, electrically adjustable dampers, active stabilizer bar
Suspension Type (rear): Multilink, coil springs, electrically adjustable dampers, active stabilizer bar
Tire Size (front): 245/35ZR20 (91Y)
Tire Size (rear): 295/30ZR20 (101Y)
Tire Brand: Pirelli
Tire Model: P Zero
Tire Type: Asymmetrical, high-performance, summer
As Tested Curb Weight (lb): 3,277

Test Results:

Acceleration
0-30 (sec): 1.9 (2.2 w/ TC on)
0-45 (sec): 3.0 (3.3 w/ TC on)
0-60 (sec): 4.6 (5.0 w/ TC on)
0-60 with 1-ft Rollout (sec): 4.4 (4.6 w/ TC on)
0-75 (sec): 6.3 (6.5 w/ TC on)
1/4-Mile (sec @ mph): 12.7 @ 113.2 (13.0 @ 111.7 w/ TC on)

Braking
30-0 (ft): 25
60-0 (ft): 102

Handling
Slalom (mph): 71.3
Skid Pad Lateral Acceleration (g): 1.03 (1.04 w/ ESC on)
RPM @ 70: 2,100

Comments:

Acceleration: Biggest news here is that the 911 no longer produces its trademark axle-hopping launch. Instead, it merely hazed the rear tires and resisted bogging down the engine once the tires hooked up. Shifter feels a little vague in that I rarely trusted my 2-3 shift, yet it always went in. All runs in Sport Plus with the exhaust open. Also felt some sort of shift-shock reduction with each upshift that wouldn't allow wheel chirp. Shifts were smooth, but slightly delayed.

Braking: Medium-firm pedal with moderate jump-in, but amazing power/effectiveness toward the end of the stop. Very little dive (firm suspension setting), no wiggle and distances grew shorter with some heat in the brakes. No fade at all.

Handling:

Skid pad: One of a handful of cars that oversteers comfortably, confidently precisely all the way around the circle. Steering weight comes and goes with front grip level but graininess/feel are no longer there. I could steer with the throttle all the way around.

Slalom: Quick turn-in but a small delay in yaw reaction. Tracks very true to steering input but requires a little patience for the chassis to catch up. Never felt threatening or apt to spin, even with drop-throttle. Had to be prudent with throttle at exit but it sure feels like there's an LSD back there making sure all the power is used effectively.

And for fun, here's what it looks like when the 2014 Chevy Corvette Stingray goes up against a 2012 Porsche 911 Carrera S with PDK instead of the manual transmission.

2014 Chevy Corvette
2012 Porsche 911 Carrera S PDK
Curb weight as tested:
3,444
3,332
0-30 (sec.):
1.8
1.5
0-45 (sec.):
2.8
2.6
0-60 (sec.):
4.1
3.9
0-60 with 1-ft Rollout (sec.):
3.8
3.7
0-75 (sec.):
5.6
5.5
1/4-mile (sec @ mph):
12.0 @ 117.3
12.0 @ 116.5
30-0 (ft):
23
25
60-0 (ft):
93
98
Skid Pad Lateral Accel (g):
1.08
1.03
Slalom:
72.8
71.4

The manufacturers provided Edmunds these vehicles for the purposes of evaluation.

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Comments

  • jederino jederino Posts:

    Crazy numbers - reading them just dazes me. I love both these cars.

  • joefrompa joefrompa Posts:

    Edmunds test of the 991-series 911 S PDK matched the Corvette's acceleration numbers: http://www.edmunds.com/car-reviews/track-tests/track-tested-2012-porsche-911-carrera-s-pdk-vs-7-speed-manual.html I like these comparisons, I really do, but I don't know if you can call them track tests unless they include a track session. Slalom, skidpad, and braking distances are not the same thing as track times. That being said, I genuinely believe the Corvette manual would beat the PDK 911 S on just about any track given equal drivers. Which is just a phenomenal testament for the Corvette and against Porsche - the S model is an upgraded sports car, it should be more of a track monster than the Corvette. But it's not. Good for you Chevy.

  • cynic783 cynic783 Posts:

    PDK 911 is very impressive, scoring some wins in simple straight line acceleration (although it falls behind in 1/4 mile see MPH trap speed)

  • mjm21 mjm21 Posts:

    Gm states the vette 60-0 is 104 not 93 in the manufatures estimates. While I really really like the braking distance of your test (93ft) in all the other magazines and Internet tests I've seen its between 103-104. Not saying that it isn't correct, just interesting/amazing that its that much faster to 0.

  • DLu DLu Posts:

    First I've read that the Stingray has rev-matched downshifting. This trend is ridiculous. What's the point of a stick shift if you are getting less and less driver involvement? Soon you'll have a "manual" that doesn't use a clutch pedal ... oh, wait ...

  • steel_3d steel_3d Posts:

    Rev match can be turned off with the flick of a steering wheel paddle, and you can heel and toe all day.

  • DLu DLu Posts:

    It's nice that it can be turned off. The presence of such tech certainly doesn't detract from how amazing this new Corvette is, but it's still not a good thing.

  • shatner shatner Posts:

    One car says "I have a lot of money". The other says "I am a 65 year old bald man".

  • would like to point out to Edmonds that even though all of the published braking tests mentioned a softening of the pedal after repeated single-stop tests, the distances didn't increase. There didn't seem to be any fade on any tests... Porsche's PDK is impressive, but overall the numbers, balance, and characteristics of stability in the Stingray point to track victory... It will likely be a great advantage for the 'Ray when their dual clutch 8 speed auto transaxle is released (hopefully) in 2015.

  • speaking of the Stingray's braking tests, to clarify...

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