Top 10 Trucks for Driver/Front-Passenger Space for 2001

(Average of total head-, hip- and legroom)


As roomy as the Nissan Maxima and Lexus LS 430 are (they're number one and two on the cars version of this list), they can't equal the accommodations offered by full-size trucks and vans. Of course, opting for a truck has serious trade-offs (handling, fuel economy, and the like), but if you need more room than a sedan can provide, one of these hefty vehicles may suffice, especially if you're into towing and hauling.

(All measurements are given in inches)

  1. 1. Ford Excursion

    Head Room: 41.0   Hip Room: 67.5   Legroom: 42.3   Average: 50.3

    We had a feeling the Excursion would be our number one on this list — this thirsty behemoth even surpasses its platform mate, the F-Series Super Duty, for front-seat space. In any case, we would urge anyone considering an Excursion to think long and hard before choosing it over a Chevrolet Suburban/GMC Yukon XL 2500. Why? It handles about as well as a loaded U-Haul truck, it won't fit into a standard-size garage and even though it's a larger, heavier vehicle, it can't match the Suburban's towing capacity. Yes, the Excursion requires a change in driving habits for most people (no quick lane changes on the freeway, for example) with no added benefits, save for the spacious cabin. But this list is all about space, so if you think you can put up with a truck this big on a daily basis, then have at it. Two-wheel-drive Excursions come standard with a 5.4-liter V8 good for 255 horsepower and 355 foot-pounds of torque, while four-wheel-drive models get a 6.8-liter V10 that produces 310 horsepower and 425 ft-lbs of twisting force (optional for 2WD models). Optional across the line is a 7.3-liter turbodiesel powerplant that makes 250 horsepower and 500 ft-lbs of torque. A four-speed automatic is standard for all Excursions. After you settle on a drivetrain, you can choose between two trim levels. The base XLT model includes running boards, remote keyless entry, four-wheel disc brakes with ABS, an AM/FM/cassette/CD stereo, a 40/20/40 split-bench front seat and a third-row removable bench seat. Limited trim buys a leather interior, front captain's chairs, faux wood trim, rear-seat audio controls, a trip computer, power rear quarter windows, aluminum wheels, illuminated running boards, power signal aero mirrors and fog lamps (a rear entertainment system is optional). For maximum space, stick with the XLT and its front bench seat — when so equipped, the Excursion offers nine-passenger seating.

  2. 2. Ford F-Series Super Duty (250 and 350)

    Head Room: 41.4   Hip Room: 67.4   Legroom: 40.7   Average: 49.9

    The Super Duty pickups (that is, the F-250 and F-350) offer about an inch-and-a-half less legroom than the Excursion, but you'll probably find the difference negligible. These pickups target the ever-burgeoning commercial-use segment of the truck market, but they're also geared toward consumers whose weekend towing and hauling needs exceed the capabilities of the smaller F-150. The Super Duties come in Regular Cab, SuperCab and Crew Cab styles. The overall look is much more aggressive than the standard F-150's, and the trucks' larger dimensions allow Ford to use bigger cabs without compromising load space. SuperCab and Crew Cab buyers have their choice of two bed sizes (all Regular Cabs get the larger bed). A variety of optional equipment is available, including electronic shift-on-the-fly four-wheel drive, a heavy-duty suspension package and manually telescoping trailer-towing mirrors. Inside, the roomy cabs have large, comfortable seats and generous seat-track travel. A 5.4-liter Triton V8 engine is standard across the line, and a 6.8-liter V10 and 7.3-liter turbodiesel V8 are optional. Any of the powerplants can be paired with a manual or automatic transmission in the Super Duty trucks. As with their SUV variant, you needn't skimp on luxury, as leather seating is available in Lariat models. While the pickups offer decent handling for their size, they ride harshly when they're not towing or hauling loads and can be difficult to park — such are the trade-offs of large pickup ownership. The Super Duty series offers a wide range of configurations to suit most every buyer, but you'll find it worth your while to try the offerings from Chevrolet/GMC and Dodge, as well.

  3. 3. Ford Econoline*

    Head Room: 42.5   Hip Room: 65.6   Legroom: 40.0   Average: 49.4

    If you can get past the plain full-size van styling and you have passengers to haul, the cavernous Econoline vans are worthy of your consideration. Each rides on a 138-inch wheelbase and can accommodate seven or eight (E-150), or 12 (E-350 Super Duty) or 15 (E-350 Super Duty Extended) passengers. Once you've selected your model, you can swath it in XL or XLT trim and fit it with one of six engine choices (including a special-order natural gas V8). The base E-150 comes standard with a modest 200-horsepower 4.2-liter V6 (191 horsepower and 244 foot-pounds of torque), but you may prefer the optional 4.6-liter V8 good for 225 horses and 286 ft-lbs of torque or the 5.4-liter V8 (standard for both E-350 Super Duty vans) that makes 255 horsepower and 350 ft-lbs of twist. Super Duty buyers can also get brawnier powerplants such as the F-Series' 6.8-liter V10 (good for 305 horsepower and 420 ft-lbs in the E-350 vans) or 7.3-liter turbodiesel V8 (215 and 425). On the subject of cargo space, even the base E-150 offers 257 cubic feet, while in comparison, the more stylish Excursion offers only 146 cubic feet. Towing is also within the Econoline vans' grasp; the Super Duty Extended can pull up to 10,000 pounds. As you might expect, the vans drive like delivery vehicles, so you may not want one for everyday motoring. Handling is light, though, and the ride isn't too bad. The Econolines aren't as groovy as big SUVs or as user-friendly as minivans, but they can swallow a lot more stuff. Of course, Chevrolet/GMC and Dodge offer their own lines of full-size vans, so you'll probably want to comparison-shop on the basis of price and desired options.

  4. 4. Dodge Ram Pickup (1500, 2500 and 3500)

    Head Room: 40.2   Hip Room: 65.6   Legroom: 41.0   Average: 48.9

    The Dodge Ram is the truck among trucks. As Ford, Chevrolet, GMC and Toyota pander to those who want a comfortable ride and convenience features, the Dodge remains true to those who want a tough, no-compromises pickup. And the current version (introduced in 1994) has a roomier front seat than any of the softer pickups. If you're in the market for a full-size truck, you should be aware that redesigned Ram 1500 Pickups will hit the dealerships in the fall of 2001 — new versions of the heavier-duty 2500 and 3500 models will follow in 2002. While the new Rams should be even more spacious, it seems that they may be a bit more civilized, as well. Civilized, as in an independent front suspension and four-wheel disc brakes for every Ram, along with optional side curtain airbags! We doubt these upgrades will deplete much (if any) of the pickup's toughness, and four-wheel discs should curtail the current generation's excessive stopping distances. The 2001 engine lineup includes a practical-and-it-feels-that-way 3.9-liter V6 that makes 175 horsepower and 230 foot-pounds of torque, and at the other extreme, an 8.0-liter V10, good for 310 horsepower and 450 ft-lbs of twisting force, is available for 2500 and 3500 models. In-between are a couple of V8s — a 5.2-liter that makes 230 horses and 300 ft-lbs of torque and a 5.9-liter that makes 245 and 335. And for 2500 and 3500 owners who want gobs of pulling power, regular- and high-output versions of the 5.9-liter inline six Cummins turbodiesel are available (with torque figures of 460 and 505). In the new 2002 Rams, the Chrysler family's 235-horsepower 4.7-liter V8 (it's already used in the Dodge Durango and Jeep Grand Cherokee) will replace the 5.2-liter V8, while a 210-horsepower 3.7-liter V6 based on the 4.7-liter will take the place of the 3.9-liter V6. The trucks will also be getting a new four-speed automatic transmission. The Ram is definitely worthy of consideration if you're shopping for a big truck with a big cabin, though we heartily recommend waiting until the redesigned pickups arrive in the fall.

  5. 5. Chevrolet Astro/GMC Safari*

    Head Room: 39.2   Hip Room: 64.9   Legroom: 41.6   Average: 48.6

    Chevrolet sells three different vans: the Venture, the Express and the Astro. The Venture covers the minivan segment, and the Express competes against the other full-size vans (Ford Econoline, Dodge Ram Wagon). The Astro is Chevrolet's mid-size offering (the GMC Safari is its twin), and it actually offers slightly more room for the driver and front passenger than the full-size Express. While insiders tell us that the Astro's and Safari's days are numbered (they were introduced in 1985), their packaging makes sense — a typical buyer might want the seven- or eight-passenger seating that front-wheel drive minivans offer and towing/hauling capacity that exceeds a Venture's capabilities. And this is accomplished without the added size and expense of a full-size van or large SUV. Both the Astro and the Safari come standard with GM's 4300 Vortec V6 that makes 190 horsepower and 250 foot-pounds of torque and a four-speed automatic transmission. All-wheel drive is available, but if you're doing a lot of towing, stick with rear-wheel-drive — the all-wheel-drive system adds weight, reduces fuel economy and shaves 300 pounds off the rear-drive vans' 5,500-lb. trailer-weight limit. A limited-slip differential is optional for both rear-wheel-drive and all-wheel-drive models. The Astro and Safari are each available in two trim levels, a well-equipped LS/SLE and top-of-the line LT/SLT. A third-row bench and eight-passenger seating are standard for all models, though opting for center-row buckets cuts seating to seven. Instead of the typical minivan lift-up rear door, GM offers right- and left-hand rear load doors, with the option of choosing "dutch" doors (standard on LT/SLT), which feature a liftglass and a split tailgate. Both vans are more truck-like in temperament than modern minivans, but they deliver a smooth highway ride with competent handling. Unfortunately, these aged vans didn't fare well in crash testing, which may cancel out their utility for those who were planning to put loved ones inside them.

  6. 6. Chevrolet Express/GMC Savana*

    Head Room: 40.6   Hip Room: 63.8   Legroom: 41.1   Average: 48.5

    The full-size Express and Savana vans finished behind the mid-size Astro/Safari on our list because they offer slightly less hip- and legroom. However, the larger vans offer more power for towing and hauling (that is, V8 engine choices), room for more than eight passengers, modern mechanicals (they were last redesigned for 1996) and more extensive feature content. The Express and Savana come in three versions — 1500, 2500 and 3500. The heavy-duty 2500 and 3500 vans are available as extended wheelbase models; these longer vans provide 316.8 cubic feet of cargo space to the regular-size vans' 267 cubic feet. Seating configurations accommodate eight, 12 or 15 passengers, and trick rear doors open 180 degrees to make loading and unloading gear an easier task. The standard side cargo doors are a 60/40-panel arrangement, but a traditional slider is a no-cost option. The base engine is a 200-horsepower Vortec 4300 V6. Optional engines include a 220-horse Vortec 5000 V8, the venerable 255-horse Vortec 5700 V8, and GM's new Vortec 8100 V8 that makes 340 ponies and a whopping 455 foot-pounds of torque. Also available is a 6.5-liter turbodiesel V8 good for 195 horsepower and 430 ft-lbs of torque. GM's heavy-duty 4L80-E transmission handles all the shifting chores. The 3500 vans can tow up to 10,000 pounds when equipped with the 8100 V8. Besides their newer underpinnings, the main thing to recommend GM's full-size vans over the Ford's Econoline and Dodge's Ram Wagon are their more powerful engines. Beyond that, you'll want to compare options: The Express, Savana and Econoline offer such fineries as leather and a rear entertainment system, such that you can enjoy near-conversion van comfort in the factory interiors.

  7. 7. Lincoln Navigator (tie)

    Head Room: 39.8   Hip Room: 61.2   Legroom: 42.8   Average: 47.9

    If you're not into the Dodge Ram, your next pickup choice for front interior space is GM's extensive line of full-size pickups, which includes the Chevrolet Silverado and the GMC Sierra. Each brand has three versions: 1500, 2500 and 3500, and 1500 and 2500 pickups are available in light- and heavy-duty versions. Then, you still have to decide on a regular, extended or crew cab with a 6.5-foot or 8-foot bed and two- or four-wheel-drive. Many people will find these trucks more satisfying than any other full-size pickup, because they offer the most powerful engines, and hence, the greatest weight-carrying capacity. And they handle more nimbly than Rams and F-150s. Light-duty 1500 trucks are available as regular and extended cabs and with three engine choices — actually four if you include the GMC Sierra C3, a special all-wheel-drive extended cab pickup that incorporates the fineries of GMC's Yukon Denali, including a 6.0-liter V8 (good for 325 horsepower and 370 foot-pounds of torque in the C3). Otherwise, our favorite powerplant for the Silverado/Sierra 1500s is the 5.3-liter V8 that produces 285 horsepower and 325 ft-lbs of twist — less juice, to be sure, but plenty for a fun drive. As a member of the Heavy Duty series, the 1500HD crew cab comes with the same version of the 6.0-liter V8 (300 horses and 360 ft-lbs in this case) standard in 2500 and 3500 trucks and has greater towing capacity than its light-duty brethren. Of course, many 2500 and 3500 buyers would prefer to take advantage of the Vortec 8100 V8 rated at 340 horsepower and 455 ft-lbs of torque or the Duramax 6600 turbodiesel V8 that develops 300 horsepower and a monstrous 520 ft-lbs of twist. Heavy-duty 2500 models and all 3500 models are eligible for the Allison five-speed automatic transmission, which features grade braking (provides engine braking without a manual downshift) and shift stabilization (prevents ill-timed upshifts/downshifts when you're towing or hauling). A six-speed manual gearbox is available for those who like to make these decisions themselves. And with the use of a fifth-wheel hitch, these trucks can tow up to 15,800 pounds. When deciding whether to go with a Chevy or a GMC, it comes down to styling, features and price: The arguably more attractive GMCs offer a few more features but cost a bit more.

  8. 8. Chevrolet Silverado/GMC Sierra (tie)

    Head Room: 41.0   Hip Room: 61.4   Legroom: 41.3   Average: 47.9

    The full-size Express and Savana vans finished behind the mid-size Astro/Safari on our list because they offer slightly less hip- and legroom. However, the larger vans offer more power for towing and hauling (that is, V8 engine choices), room for more than eight passengers, modern mechanicals (they were last redesigned for 1996) and more extensive feature content. The Express and Savana come in three versions — 1500, 2500 and 3500. The heavy-duty 2500 and 3500 vans are available as extended wheelbase models; these longer vans provide 316.8 cubic feet of cargo space to the regular-size vans' 267 cubic feet. Seating configurations accommodate eight, 12 or 15 passengers, and trick rear doors open 180 degrees to make loading and unloading gear an easier task. The standard side cargo doors are a 60/40-panel arrangement, but a traditional slider is a no-cost option. The base engine is a 200-horsepower Vortec 4300 V6. Optional engines include a 220-horse Vortec 5000 V8, the venerable 255-horse Vortec 5700 V8, and GM's new Vortec 8100 V8 that makes 340 ponies and a whopping 455 foot-pounds of torque. Also available is a 6.5-liter turbodiesel V8 good for 195 horsepower and 430 ft-lbs of torque. GM's heavy-duty 4L80-E transmission handles all the shifting chores. The 3500 vans can tow up to 10,000 pounds when equipped with the 8100 V8. Besides their newer underpinnings, the main thing to recommend GM's full-size vans over the Ford's Econoline and Dodge's Ram Wagon are their more powerful engines. Beyond that, you'll want to compare options: The Express, Savana and Econoline offer such fineries as leather and a rear entertainment system, such that you can enjoy near-conversion van comfort in the factory interiors.

  9. 9. Chevrolet Suburban/GMC Yukon XL (tie)

    Head Room: 40.7   Hip Room: 61.4   Legroom: 41.3   Average: 47.8

    It shouldn't surprise you that we came up with a six-way tie for the ninth spot: The Escalade, Tahoe and Yukon are shorter versions of the giant Suburban, while the Avalanche is a 'Burb with part of the roof chopped off. The Suburban and the Yukon XL are twins, though of course, the styling is slightly different and the GMC version offers more features if you step up to the Denali XL model. Both trucks are over 18 feet long and come in half-ton and three-quarter-ton versions (that is, 1500 and 2500) with either two- or four-wheel-drive (unless you get the all-wheel-drive Denali). In spite of their size, even 2500 4WD Suburbans and Yukons will fit into a standard-size garage, which gives them an advantage over the Ford Excursion. The 1500s come with the same 5.3-liter V8 engine used in GM's full-size pickups, while the 2500s can be equipped with either the standard 6.0-liter V8 (315 horses and 365 foot-pounds of torque) or the Vortec 8100 V8 (also optional for the heavy-duty pickups). While the Denali XL is the size of a 1500, it gets a 320-horsepower version of the 2500's 6.0-liter V8, thus keeping it a few steps ahead of the 300-horse Lincoln Navigator. Ride and handling have been vastly improved from the previous Suburbans (the Yukon XL arrived with the 2000 redesign), with increased body strength and stiffness. The 1500s are equipped with a five-link coil-spring rear suspension, allowing the truck to track better on gravel or washboard roads and giving you more wheel control. The suspension on the 2500s comes with the same rear leaf springs as their Silverado/Sierra stablemates, giving them heavy-duty towing capacities to go with the strong V8s. Optional traction control helps 2WD models stay on track even when roads are slippery. The interiors are cavernous and comfortable for eight or nine (seven with a Denali's second-row captain's chairs), and a sizeable list of options is available to make them family-friendly, especially if you spring for the luxo Denali XL.

  10. 10. Cadillac Escalade/Chevrolet Tahoe/GMC Yukon (tie)

    Head Room: 40.7   Hip Room: 61.4   Legroom: 41.3   Average: 47.8

    We're not sure that Cadillac would like to see its exclusive Escalade lumped in with the more ordinary Tahoe and Yukon. But differences aside, the interiors have the same underpinnings, so the dimensions are the same. Seating capacity is the same — eight or nine for regular Tahoes and Yukons (depending on whether you keep the front bench seat) and seven for upscale Yukon Denalis and Escalades — but the cargo bays are shorter than the Suburban's. An easily removable 50/50-split third-row bench is available for each. Since these trucks are available only as light-duty half-ton (1500) models, towing capacity is reduced; 8,700 pounds is the limit. Two- and four-wheel drive are offered for the Chevy and GMC lines, except the Denali, which has all-wheel drive. Escalade buyers can choose 2WD or AWD. A 4.8-liter V8 (275 horsepower and 290 foot-pounds of torque) is standard for the base Tahoe and for the entire Yukon line. Standard for Tahoe LS and LT and optional for all Yukons is GM's 5.3-liter V8 — you'll want this one for towing. The smaller Denali feels a bit more vigorous, as it shares the 320-horse 6.0-liter V8 with its XL cousin. Swiftest of all, of course, is the AWD Escalade, which comes with a high-compression version of the 6.0-liter, which makes 345 horsepower and 380 ft-lbs of twist. Two-wheel-drive Escalades get the 5.3-liter. Like their larger relatives, these trucks are designed to stand up to the rigors of off-roading while providing a comfortable on-road ride. A sizeable list of available features awaits potential buyers, particularly those drooling over Denalis and Escalades, including leather, a 250-watt Bose sound system with a six-disc in-dash changer, OnStar telematics and Cadillac exclusives like StabiliTrak (stability control) and Road Sensing Suspension (which improves ride comfort, handling and towing performance). Fortunately, base Tahoes start in the mid-20s, so that they're not completely out of reach for the average consumer.

  11. 11. Chevrolet Avalanche (tie)

    Head Room: 40.7   Hip Room: 61.4   Legroom: 41.3   Average: 47.8

    The Avalanche has been hailed as the industry's first Ultimate Utility Truck (that's UUT instead of SUV). Besides offering spacious accommodations for the driver and her front passenger, this new Chevy attempts to bridge the gap between the comfort of a full-size SUV and the utility of a pickup truck. To achieve this, the Avalanche utilizes a foldable midgate between the bed and the second row of seats. In its standard configuration, the Avalanche is a comfortable five- or six-passenger (depending on the front seat) sport-ute that also provides a short cargo bed. Should you need to haul a 4x8-foot sheet of plywood, just remove the rear window (a simple twist and pull operation), fold the rear seats and lower the midgate for an instant transformation into a full-fledged work truck, complete with an 8-foot 1-inch bed. Fortunately, the transition is easily made without the aid of tools. The Avalanche also incorporates many other innovative features like lockable storage chests in each side of the bed, a rear bumper with integrated step-ups and built-in grab handles that also serve as cargo tie downs. A three-piece cargo cover is standard, and an optional ribbed soft cover comes with a handy storage bag that mounts to the side of the bed with beefy snaphooks and a ratchet strap to keep it snug. Beneath all of its cool functionality are Chevy Suburban underpinnings. As such, the Avalanche is available as a 1500 or 2500 model with two- or four-wheel-drive. 1500s come standard with the family 5.3-liter V8, while brawnier 2500s get the 8.1-liter V8 (340 horses and 460 foot-pounds of torque) and can tow up to 12,000 pounds. A four-speed automatic with a tow/haul mode is standard for both. The interior is like every other Chevy pickup's (good ergonomics, cheap materials), but Avalanche buyers can choose from four different seat fabrics (cloth, sport cloth, sport leather, leather). The Avalanche has all of the strengths and shortcomings of your average GM truck, but its added utility should appeal to buyers who are hesitant to settle for a traditional crew cab pickup with a shrunken bed.

  12. 12. Ford F-150 (tie)

    Head Room: 40.8   Hip Room: 61.0   Legroom: 40.9   Average: 47.6

    The F-150 appeals to the masses — it won't overwhelm you with its explosive engines, towing and hauling ability or uncompromising truck toughness. Instead, each F-150 performs solidly and offers a commodious, well-assembled cab with car-like convenience features. And it doesn't have any major faults, aside from the fact that everyone owns one. F-150 buyers have an extensive list of choices — a regular, extended or crew cab; a short or long bed; two- or four-wheel drive; a manual or automatic transmission; and one of three engines. Powerplants include a 205-horsepower 4.2-liter V6, a 4.6-liter V8 that develops 220 horsepower and 290 foot-pounds of torque and a 5.4-liter V8 good for 260 horses and 350 ft-lbs (this one requires an autobox). Of course, we can't leave out the muscle car of pickups, the supercharged F-150 SVT Lightning and its reworked 5.4-liter that expels 380 horsepower and 450 ft-lbs of twist — too bad it's only available in regular cab form. If you need to transport five or six passengers, you'll want to consider the F-150 SuperCrew (though you'll give up an inch of headroom), which is basically an Expedition (the first two rows of it, anyway) with a bed on the back. Whether you dress a regular cab as a work truck or jump into a SuperCrew Lariat with leather and 17-inch wheels, you'll be getting a pickup that is capable in most, if not all, areas.

  13. 13. Toyota Sequoia (tie)

    Head Room: 41.1   Hip Room: 59.7   Legroom: 41.6   Average: 47.5

    Toyota's Sequoia represents the first serious challenge to the American stronghold on the full-size SUV market (of course, the Sequoia is built in Indiana). It's longer than the Chevy Tahoe/GMC Yukon and about the same size as a Ford Expedition. All four vehicles offer roughly equal dimensions for the driver and front passenger — the Expedition didn't make the list because it's a little short on head- and legroom. The Sequoia is powered by a smooth and silent 4.7-liter, i-Force V8 engine that develops 240 horsepower and 315 foot-pounds of torque using regular unleaded fuel. And it's the first Toyota truck to be certified as an ultra-low emissions vehicle (ULEV). The one area in which the Sequoia falls short of its peers is towing: It has a 6,500-pound tow rating, while the Expedition can pull 7,300 pounds and the Tahoe/Yukon can lug up to 8,700. But the Toyota wins back the advantage by virtue of its surprisingly car-like handling, user-friendly interior and impeccable build quality. And it's rugged enough for your off-roading adventures — its 9 inches of ground clearance (measured from the rear differential) lead the class. The Sequoia comes in SR5 or Limited trim with either two- or four-wheel drive. The SR5 comes standard with a 50/50-split third-row bench seat; CD player; traction control; stability control (Vehicle Skid Control); four-wheel disc brakes with ABS and electronic brake distribution; and power windows, door locks and mirrors (even the rear hatch window powers down). The Limited adds leather upholstery, dual-zone climate control, a 10-speaker sound system, remote keyless entry, automatic headlights, foglights and a tow hitch. Ultimately, the Sequoia is the sport-ute that will force GM and Ford back to the drawing boards — it should definitely be on your test-drive list, if you want a large SUV.

(Other close competitors include the Ford Expedition and Toyota Tundra.)

*These are traditional vans with short hoods — which means that the driver's and front passenger's footwells will be small in spite of their otherwise generous seating dimensions. This doesn't mean that you should cross them off your list — just take a thorough test drive before you buy.

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