Plaintiffs' Attorneys Seek $227 Million in Toyota Lawsuit


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    Toyota Logo Picture

    A judge in the Toyota sudden acceleration lawsuit has addressed concerns that the attorney fees and costs are excessive. | June 18, 2013

Just the Facts:
  • The plaintiffs' steering committee has asked for $200 million in attorney fees and $27 million in expenses for 31 firms, according to a judge's tentative order in the ongoing Toyota lawsuit tied to sudden acceleration defects.
  • U.S. District Court Judge James V. Selna addressed concerns that the attorney fees and costs are excessive in a tentative order issued on Friday.
  • Selna wrote that the proposed award of fees, costs and compensation is "fair, reasonable and adequate."

SANTA ANA, California — The plaintiffs' steering committee has asked for $200 million in attorney fees and $27 million in expenses for 31 firms, according to a judge's tentative order in the ongoing Toyota lawsuit tied to sudden acceleration defects.

U.S. District Court Judge James V. Selna addressed concerns that the attorney fees and costs are excessive in a tentative order issued on Friday.

Selna wrote that the proposed award of fees, costs and compensation is "fair, reasonable and adequate." But Selna held off on approving the award, writing that the "court will complete its analysis upon granting final approval of the settlement agreement."

Selna notes that Toyota, under the settlement agreement, has agreed to pay plaintiffs' class counsel separately from the settlement funds.

A proposed $1.6 billion settlement between Toyota and consumers saying they suffered economic damages tied to sudden acceleration defects in Toyota vehicles is stalled in U.S. District Court since Selna has not yet granted final approval of the deal. A new hearing in the case is set for July 19. The judge granted preliminary approval of the deal on December 28.

The holdup in the case centers on concerns about the allocation of possible excess cash.

The Toyota Economic Loss Web site says consumers have until July 29 to submit a claim. The cars covered include the 2001-'10 Toyota Prius.

If you are a class member, you may be entitled to one or more of the following: a cash payment, installation of a brake override system in some vehicles at no charge, a cash payment if your vehicle is not a hybrid and is not eligible for a brake override system or participation in a customer support program.

Edmunds says: Judge Selna's tentative orders provide fascinating insight into the ins and outs of the Toyota economic loss lawsuit.

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