2014 Cadillac XTS Sedan Rating Details | Edmunds Rating Details
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2014 Cadillac XTS Sedan - Rating Details

B
Edmunds Rating
Vehicle Tested

2014 Cadillac XTS Vsport Premium Sedan (3.6L V6 Twin-turbo AWD 6-speed Automatic)

Driven On 9/10/2013

Ratings Summary

The XTS Vsport covers the luxury sport sedan basics: It's spacious, full of technology and packs a 410-horsepower wallop under the hood. And, it has style. Lackluster steering and the complexity of CUE are the only obstacles between it and an A grade.
B
Performance The standard XTS adequately straddles the sport/luxury line. With this new turbocharged V6 under the hood it leans heavily toward sport. All-wheel-drive and a slick 8-speed transmission really amplify its athleticism.
Acceleration
B
The 410-horsepower, turbocharged 3.6-liter V6 needed just 5.1 seconds to reach 60 mph. This is nearly 2 full seconds quicker than the normally-aspirated V6. All-wheel drive helps it dig out from a stop. Very quick shifts, but a bit rough.
Braking
C
The XTS stopped from 60 mph in 124 feet, about average for this class. Its pedal exhibited somewhat long travel while remaining fairly firm. Around town it was perfectly suited.
Steering
C
The power steering assist is excessive for our tastes. Disconcertingly light at low speeds. It stiffens up at speed, but even then lacks the confidence we expect from a sedan with its sporting intentions.
Handling
B
The XTS handles well for its size with quick turn-in. Despite noticeable body roll, even with the sport suspension selected, and some understeer, this Cadillac can be quick. AWD helps with corner exit.
Driveability
A
Lots of power available at low rpm, but some turbo/transmission lag. Compliant throttle calibration and easy steering keeps the XTS very manageable around town. Its 8-speed automatic is extremely smooth.
Towing
C
Towing capacity maxes out at 1,000 pounds for the XTS.
B
Comfort The XTS leans toward the rougher side of the luxury-sports car meter. Seat and ride comfort are firm as a result. Still, the cabin remains as quiet as those of most competitors.
Seating Comfort
B
We found the seats adequately comfortable over long distances. Not overly squishy, but not racecar seats, either. Easy to sit in for hours.
Ride Comfort
B
The adjustable magnetic ride suspension and rear air springs are technologically impressive, yet the ride isn't particularly soft. It clearly errs on the side of sport.
Quietness
B
Very little noise from the outside makes its way inside the cabin. One exception is the gentle rumble of the engine at higher rpm.
B
Interior CUE is the most polarizing feature of the XTS interior. Even with practice, the system can never quite be mastered. Still, many find its smartphone-like interaction appealing. All other interior hot-spots rank as slightly above average.
Ergonomics
C
The touchscreen features of CUE should be simple enough to operate. But it is the system's sluggishness, lack of knobs and reliance upon soft-touch sliders and dials that we found frustrating.
Ingress/Egress
B
Front doors open wide and the roofline is high enough that we had no trouble climbing in and out. The rear doors don't open as far and the roofline is lower. Watch your head.
Space/Room
B
Lots of shoulder room for front passengers with a bit less for those riding in the back. Rear headroom is adequate. Angled seatbacks allow plenty of space for knees.
Visibility
C
Its stylish design comes somewhat at the expense of visibility. Both front and rear roof-pillars are thick and limiting, despite the extra window cut-outs. A rearview camera is standard.
Cargo/Storage
B
Front passenger storage consists of a small center armrest bin, average door pockets and a modest glovebox. The trunk is deep yet narrow. Rear seatbacks fold to expand cargo space.
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B
Value The XTS is a large car with the sort of performance and price we expect from the midsize luxury segment. Its extensive list of optional equipment raises its value to a level higher than most competitors.
Build Quality (vs. $)
B
Build quality was excellent. Top-tier materials feel more luxurious than Cadillac's done before. No squeaks or rattles in our test car.
Features(vs. $)
A
The Vsport Premium is well-equipped at a starting price of $62,095. Highlights include CUE, a 14-speaker Bose stereo, magnetic ride control and 410-horsepower turbocharged 6-cylinder.
Cost
B
With an as-tested price of $65,415, the XTS is hugely competitive for the segment. It's is larger than the Audi A6, BMW 5 Series and Mercedes-Benz E-Class to boot.
MPG
C
The EPA estimates 19 mpg Combined (16/City, 24/Highway) for the Vsport AWD. That's 1 mpg less than its normally-aspirated sibling. We averaged 18.9 mpg in typical Southern California mixed driving.
Warranty
B
Cadillac's basic warranty covers 4 years or 50,000 miles. Its powertrain is backed for 6 years or 70,000 miles.
Ownership
B
The free maintenance plan spans 4 years or 50,000 miles. Roadside assistance is complimentary for 6 years or 70,000 miles.
B
Fun To Drive The XTS Vsport is better positioned to compete in this segment than ever before. Overboosted steering remains its primary performance limitation.
Driving Experience
B
Cadillac luxury with a taste of power. The 410-horse turbo-6 delivers on the power missing from the base trim XTS.
Personality
B
The turbo-6 gives this XTS extra oomph. Yet it still offers the levels of comfort and quiet we've seen from Cadillacs of late.
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