Comparison Test: 2010 BMW 335i vs. 2010 Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution MR Touring

  • Full Review
  • Pricing & Specs
  • Road Tests
  • Comparison (1)
  • Long-Term
  • 2010 Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution MR Touring Picture

    2010 Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution MR Touring Picture

    It seems an odd couple, but both are fast, fun and have four doors. | March 17, 2010

26 Photos

No-Compromise Performance Sedan vs. Gentleman's Rally Car

  • Comparison Test
  • Second Opinion
  • Top 6 Features
  • Data and Charts
  • Editors' Evaluations
  • Final Rankings and Scoring Explanation
  • 2010 Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution Specs and Performance
  • 2010 BMW 3 Series Specs and Performance

If all we evaluated in this test were the differences in steering between the 2010 BMW 335i and 2010 Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution MR Touring, they would be enough.

The Evo, all nerves and haste, offers both lighter effort and the granular acknowledgement of every surface imperfection through its steering interface. The 335i, conversely, manages to ignore the faults that make the Evo's steering wheel dance with its driver. The Bavarians have instead tuned the 335i's steering to offer less information while making it just as useful as that of the Evo. The BMW's effort is higher and its response slightly slower, yet it makes virtually no compromise when driven with purpose.

These subtle differences are a foreshadowing of the big picture each car paints as you use it to unwind a series of bends. And ultimately these differences will matter most when you choose your preferred machine.

So choose carefully.

335i Sedan vs. Evo MR Touring. Really?
Yes, really. There are undeniable similarities — four doors, similar power and similar weight — plus the base prices of these cars differ by only $260. And these similarities, friends, make for a good comparison test. Maybe nobody will cross-shop these two cars for the purpose of buying one, but each car attracts passionate enthusiasm and that makes for a good argument. And both cars are even quite good.

So we lined up a 2010 BMW 335i Sedan with the M Sport package, leather interior and iPod adapter. This example in metallic Le Mans Blue with $6,150 in options rang up a sticker price of $47,625. It comes with a twin-turbocharged 3.0-liter inline-6 rated at 300 horsepower and 300 pound-feet of torque. A six-speed manual transmission is standard.

The 2010 Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution MR Touring is, well, an old man's Evo. The Touring package adds a power sunroof (thereby deleting the aluminum roof), leather upholstery for the Recaro seats, more acoustic insulation, a navigation system, automatic headlights and rain-sensing windshield wipers. And in place of the massive rear wing (presumably the sort of thing that old men don't like) is a trunk lid spoiler.

Underneath the slightly different appearance is the same Evolution MR we've come to know. Bilstein dampers give it a smoother ride than the GSR, and there's a sophisticated dual-clutch automated manual transmission to handle the shifting should you choose not to. The Evo's turbocharged 2.0-liter inline-4 is rated at 291 hp and 300 lb-ft of torque. Three limited-slip differentials (front, center and rear) ensure effective power delivery. The Evo's center differential varies torque split front to rear while the rear varies torque from side to side. If this is your kind of sedan, Mitsubishi has just what you need for $43,984.

Hammer It
Get serious about covering ground in either of these cars and you'll be going very, very quickly. Both offer a level of performance that's substantial for their relative cost. That the performance-cost ratio falls heavily in favor of the Evo becomes evident when both are driven on the same back road.

It's here that the Evo's roots as a rally car with its associated emphasis on a significant amount of traction-enhancing electronic and mechanical hardware help to turn the 335i into a dot in the mirror. Off-camber turns, midcorner bumps and loose gravel on the road are overcome virtually effortlessly thanks to the Evo's all-wheel drive and goes-where-you-point-it handling. Combine this with the fact that once the dual-clutch transmission is set to S-sport mode the Evo MR offers an intuitive two-pedal experience for driving, and the Evo becomes the perfect car for the imperfect road.

But the 335i is no slouch. The Bimmer somehow manages to filter out much of the fracas, and what remains is the minimal information necessary to go quickly. None of the essentials are removed. Rather, there's a distillation of feedback and sound that results in a highly honed driving experience. Steering effort is higher but less busy, while the chassis takes a set early but is less receptive to midcorner adjustments. The car feels and drives as if it were heavier than the Evo as a result, even though it's actually lighter by 144 pounds. The BMW also lacks the Evo's explosive corner exit, primarily because it's only driving two wheels.

The Real World
But we're splitting hairs here. Yes, when driven to the limit on a deserted, twisting road, the Evo is the quicker of these two cars. Driven every day, in a world that's full of real-world stuff — bumps, potholes, freeway irregularities and, let's not forget, women — the BMW's compromises suddenly turn into assets. Even its slower steering seems like a positive attribute in a world where you don't want to change lanes with every sneeze.

In daily use, the Evo's heavily bolstered seats, busier suspension and maximum-attack attitude are a compromise. But its transmission is in stark contrast to the 335i's stick-rowing, old-school job. Even the best manual transmission in the world — and this is among them — is more tiresome than a two-pedal setup in traffic. And traffic, in Los Angeles at least, is a way of life.

Once again, the Evo's technology pays off. This car's flexibility is truly astounding. Thanks to its dual-clutch transmission, this car is capable of logging hours of comfortable traffic time and then switching (with the punching of a few buttons) into a driving tool that delivers the performance of a racing car. There are other very good twin-clutch gearboxes out there (Porsche's ZF-engineered PDK and Nissan's Borg-Warner-engineered unit for the GT-R) but none offer the S-sport mode of the Evo's Getrag-engineered unit, which never — and we mean never — picks the wrong gear when driven hard. (Ironically the BMW M3 uses a version of the Mitsu's Getrag-built hardware.)

It's impressive. And it comes standard in the MR for less green than the BMW with a manual transmission. More important, if traffic is a factor in daily driving, it brings the Evo's civility to within arm's reach of the BMW.

Measure It
Acceleration testing produced identical quarter-mile times for the BMW and Mitsubishi of 13.4 seconds. The Bimmer's lighter weight and slight power advantage yielded a higher trap speed (103.5 mph vs. 101.1 mph). But what the Evo gives up in trap speed, it makes up for with a quicker all-wheel-drive launch, allowing the Mitsu to beat the 335i to 60 mph from a standstill by 0.2 second (5.0 seconds vs. 5.2 seconds). With a 1-foot rollout, like you'd use on a drag strip, these times drop to 4.7 and 4.9 seconds.

Despite its large four-piston Brembo brake calipers, the Evo doesn't stop as short as the 335i. From 60 mph the stopping distances are 115 feet and 109 feet, respectively. The Evo's brakes offered more immediate pedal response, but once engaged aggressively, they lack the effectiveness we'd expect in a system this costly. Conversely, the BMW's simpler sliding-caliper brakes setup works brilliantly by offering less immediate bite but better overall effectiveness.

The results from our handling tests for these two cars are close enough to be called a wash. With the Evo turning 69.7 mph through our 600-foot slalom and the BMW recording 69.5 mph, the speed difference is far less important than what we learn about each car's handling dynamics. Perhaps the most valuable lesson in the slalom is that the BMW is very controllable as you approach its limits in right-left transitions. It can be slowly creeped toward the edge, tossed over it and brought back without a labored breath. Surprisingly, the Evo, which is marginally quicker, doesn't like such fast transitions. It will do it, but you better have quick hands and trust your car control when the going gets sideways.

These two cars also manage much the same level of cornering grip around our skid pad. The Evo circles at 0.93g while the 335i manages 0.92g. Differences here are also substantial, with the Evo muscling its way around with brute force and technology while the BMW circles with intuitive grace, dancing on the limit of adhesion with textbook rear-drive balance.

The Fundamentals
Mitsubishi made a decision when developing its Evo X to go upscale. No longer was it good enough to kick Subaru's ass. Now it wanted to go after the big players in the sport sedan market. More size, more refinement, more cost.

And that's exactly what we have in the 2010 Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution MR Touring. It's a car with its aim set squarely on the bigger, more costly and more refined German machines like, say, this 2010 BMW 335i.

And Mitsubishi has made improvements to the overall Lancer package to get to this level. But the Evo isn't on par with the BMW when it comes to the design and quality of the interior. Its navigation system is a joke by modern standards, its materials are less pleasing to touch, and, well, its switchgear still feels inexpensive.

Our only gripe about the BMW's interior? Lame cupholders.

The BMW 335i also offers 4.4 inches more wheelbase, which pays dividends in ride quality but remarkably doesn't translate into proportionally more rear-seat room. A 6-foot-2 editor found the Evo's rear seats more comfortable than the 335i's because of the Japanese sedan's squared-off roof line. Said the big guy: "Both offer enough legroom, but the Evo is less confining."

With 1.2 inches of additional overall length, the 335i did provide more trunk room. Folding split-back rear seats are optional for the 335i, but this car doesn't have them. The Evo's trunk space is significantly diminished by the packaging of windshield washer fluid and the battery between the rear seatback and the trunk. And that, as you might imagine, means its seats also don't fold.

There Must Be a Winner
That this was a close comparison test goes without saying. But in the end, the ability of the 2010 Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution MR Touring to deliver value in the form of usable features like a dual-clutch transmission, all-wheel drive and limited-slip differentials give it the win.

But the crux of this contest surpasses any evaluation that can be given by our comparison-test scoring protocol, which emphasizes plenty of numbers. The real meat of this contest is a matter of what you want from your only car. Most who buy these performance sedans will use them that way — hauling wives, kids, friends and cargo. Quickly, if necessary.

So it comes down to what's important for you in a performance sedan. Many will say it's a sublime mix of performance and comfort. And for those folks, the BMW 335i is the right car. If it's purely performance that you want and cost is a factor, then the Mitsubishi Evo is your car.

Either way, the steering feel is world-class.

The manufacturers provided Edmunds these vehicles for the purposes of evaluation.

Engineering Editor Jason Kavanagh says:
Here's all you need to know about this comparison test: The 2010 BMW 335i has no limited-slip differential. The 2010 Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution has three.

Even in this full-zoot Touring trim, the Evo pleads you to corner just that much harder, brake that much deeper and get on the throttle that much sooner than the BMW. Forget the badge, and your preconceptions. The Evo is more communicative and ultimately more capable than the 335i in every way. It's rewarding, and we're happy to oblige. Too bad about that tiresomely indifferent intake note and chintzier cabin, though. And what's up with the crummy nav screen interface?

The BMW, on the other hand, is a gentler daily proposition. It doesn't quite have the features list of the Evo, but there's less of an edge to the ride and less road noise as well. Power is plentiful, particularly from the low end of the tach.

There's a reason both of these cars have won virtually every comparison test in which they've been included — they're both outstanding at what they do. It just happens to be not the same thing, despite their numerous similarities on paper. Sure, it's easier to tell your mates you spent $40 large on a Bimmer rather than on a Mitsubishi. But the Evo is clearly the driver's choice.

The role of features in a comparison test is to demonstrate what a buyer gets for his or her money. For this test we've selected features we think will matter most to the driver of a performance sedan. The performance sedan segment is unique in that many who drive these cars use them as their only vehicle, so there must be an element of practicality in the vehicle's design.

Features
  Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution MR Touring BMW 335i Sedan
Adaptive headlamps N/A S
All-wheel drive S N/A
Dual-clutch transmision S N/A
iPod and USB adapter N/A O
Limited-slip differential(s) S N/A
Navigation system O O*

Key:
S: Standard
O: Optional and present on test vehicle
O*: Optional but absent on test vehicle
N/A: Not Available

Adaptive headlamps: Adaptive (self-leveling) headlights do wonders for enhancing spirited night driving and increasing safety on unfamiliar roads. They're standard on the BMW 335i.

All-wheel drive: All-wheel drive is a confidence-booster in performance driving. It launches a car out of corners explosively and allows physics-defying feats in a way that rear-drive never does. It also improves drivability in poor weather.

Dual-clutch transmission: Converts to the dual-clutch transmission say it's the best of both worlds — fully automatic shifting when you want it and incredibly flexible manual shifting when you want total control. We say Mitsubishi makes among the best dual-clutch transmissions sold today. Its S-sport mode is unrivaled when it comes to hard driving using only two pedals.

iPod and USB adapter: Many modern cars offer the ability to integrate an MP3 player into their audio system, allowing full control of the device from the car's interface. And those that don't should. The Evo offers only a simple auxiliary input.

Limited-slip differential(s): There's no excuse for a 300-horsepower rear-wheel-drive car without a limited-slip differential. And although BMW manages to tune its chassis despite the lack of a limited-slip, there's just no substitute for the added traction this feature provides. The Evo, by the way, has three limited-slips.

Navigation system: Mitsubishi's navigation system is dated by modern standards, but even a dated navigation system is better than no navigation system at all — which is what you get in the more expensive BMW 335i.

Dimensions
Engine & Transmission Specifications
Warranty Information
Performance Information

Dimensions

Exterior Dimensions & Capacities
  BMW 335i Sedan Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution MR Touring
Length, in. 178.2 177.0
Width, in. 71.5 71.3
Height, in. 55.9 58.3
Wheelbase, in. 108.7 104.3
As Tested Curb Weight, lb. 3,526 3,670
Turning Circle, ft. 36.1 38.7


Interior Dimensions
  BMW 335i Sedan Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution MR Touring
Front headroom, in. 41.5 40.6
Rear headroom, in. 37.5 36.9
Front shoulder room, in. 55.4 54.7
Rear shoulder room, in. 55.1 54.3
Front legroom, in. 41.5 42.5
Rear legroom, in. 34.6 33.3
Cargo volume, cu-ft. 12.0 6.9
Max cargo volume, cu-ft. N/A 6.9


Engine & Transmission Specifications
Engine & Transmission
  BMW 335i Sedan Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution MR Touring
Displacement
(cc / cu-in):
3000 (183) 2000 (122)
Engine Type Inline six-cylinder, turbocharged and intercooled Inline four-cylinder, turbocharged and intercooled
Horsepower (SAE) @ rpm 300 @ 5,800 291 @ 6,500
Max. Torque, lb-ft @ rpm 300 lb-ft @ 1,400 300 lb-ft @ 4,000
Transmission 6-speed manual 6-speed dual-clutch
EPA Fuel Economy City, mpg 17.0 17.0
EPA Fuel Economy Hwy, mpg 26.0 22.0
Observed Fuel Economy combined, mpg 20.3 18.3


Warranty
Warranty Information
  BMW 335i Sedan Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution MR Touring
Basic Warranty 4 years/50,000 miles 3 years/36,000 miles
Powertrain 4 years/50,000 miles 5 years/60,000 miles
Roadside Assistance 4 years/unlimited miles Not Available
Corrosion Protection 12-year rust warranty 7 years/100,000 miles


Performance
Performance Information
  BMW 335i Sedan Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution MR Touring
0-60 mph acceleration, sec. 5.2 5.0
Quarter-mile acceleration, sec. 13.4 13.4
Quarter-mile speed, mph 103.5 101.1
60-0-mph braking, feet 109 115
Lateral Acceleration, g 0.92 0.93
600-ft slalom, mph 69.5 69.7

Evaluation - Drive
Evaluation - Ride
Evaluation - Design
Evaluation - Function

Evaluation - Drive

Overall Dynamics
Vehicle Score Rank
BMW 335i Sedan 8.3 2
Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution MR Touring 8.8 1

Engine Performance
Vehicle Score Rank
BMW 335i Sedan 8.3 2
Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution MR Touring 8.5 1

Transmission Performance
Vehicle Score Rank
BMW 335i Sedan 8.5 1
Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution MR Touring 8.5 1

Brake Performance
Vehicle Score Rank
BMW 335i Sedan 8.5 1
Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution MR Touring 8.5 1

Steering Performance
Vehicle Score Rank
BMW 335i Sedan 8.0 2
Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution MR Touring 9.0 1

Handling
Vehicle Score Rank
BMW 335i Sedan 8.5 2
Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution MR Touring 9.0 1

Fun to Drive
Vehicle Score Rank
BMW 335i Sedan 8.0 2
Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution MR Touring 9.0 1

Evaluation - Ride

Overall Comfort
Vehicle Score Rank
BMW 335i Sedan 8.1 1
Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution MR Touring 7.4 2

Ride Comfort
Vehicle Score Rank
BMW 335i Sedan 9.0 1
Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution MR Touring 7.8 2

Wind Noise
Vehicle Score Rank
BMW 335i Sedan 8.0 1
Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution MR Touring 7.0 2

Road Noise
Vehicle Score Rank
BMW 335i Sedan 8.0 1
Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution MR Touring 6.5 2

Front Seat Comfort/Space/Access
Vehicle Score Rank
BMW 335i Sedan 8.5 1
Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution MR Touring 8.5 1

Rear Seat Comfort/Space/Access
Vehicle Score Rank
BMW 335i Sedan 7.0 2
Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution MR Touring 7.5 1

Driving Position
Vehicle Score Rank
BMW 335i Sedan 8.0 1
Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution MR Touring 7.0 2

Evaluation - Design

Overall Design & Build Quality
Vehicle Score Rank
BMW 335i Sedan 7.5 1
Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution MR Touring 7.0 2

Exterior Design
Vehicle Score Rank
BMW 335i Sedan 7.3 1
Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution MR Touring 7.0 2

Interior Design
Vehicle Score Rank
BMW 335i Sedan 7.0 1
Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution MR Touring 7.0 1

Interior Materials
Vehicle Score Rank
BMW 335i Sedan 8.5 1
Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution MR Touring 7.3 2

Interior Control Tactile Feel
Vehicle Score Rank
BMW 335i Sedan 8.0 1
Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution MR Touring 7.0 2

Squeaks & Rattles
Vehicle Score Rank
BMW 335i Sedan 7.0 1
Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution MR Touring 7.0 1

Panel Fitment & Gaps
Vehicle Score Rank
BMW 335i Sedan 7.3 1
Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution MR Touring 7.0 2


Evaluation - Function

Overall Function
Vehicle Score Rank
BMW 335i Sedan 7.1 1
Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution MR Touring 7.0 2

Headlamp Illumination
Vehicle Score Rank
BMW 335i Sedan 8.0 1
Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution MR Touring 7.5 2

Visibility
Vehicle Score Rank
BMW 335i Sedan 7.5 1
Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution MR Touring 7.5 1

Instrument Panel (IP) Layout
Vehicle Score Rank
BMW 335i Sedan 7.5 1
Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution MR Touring 7.5 1

Climate Control Layout
Vehicle Score Rank
BMW 335i Sedan 7.0 2
Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution MR Touring 8.0 1

Audio System Layout
Vehicle Score Rank
BMW 335i Sedan 6.5 1
Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution MR Touring 6.0 2

Secondary Control Layout
Vehicle Score Rank
BMW 335i Sedan 7.5 1
Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution MR Touring 7.0 2

Interior Storage
Vehicle Score Rank
BMW 335i Sedan 7.0 2
Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution MR Touring 7.5 1

Cupholders
Vehicle Score Rank
BMW 335i Sedan 6.0 2
Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution MR Touring 7.0 1

Standard Cargo / Trunk Space
Vehicle Score Rank
BMW 335i Sedan 7.0 1
Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution MR Touring 6.0 2

Maximum Cargo Space
Vehicle Score Rank
BMW 335i Sedan 7.0 1
Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution MR Touring 6.0 2

Final Rankings

Item Weight Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution MR Touring BMW 335i Sedan
Personal Rating 2.5% 100.0 50.0
Recommended Rating 2.5% 50.0 100.0
Evaluation Score 20% 75.4 77.4
Feature Content 20% 61.1 33.3
Performance 25% 96.0 97.7
Fuel Consumption 15% 90.6 100.0
Price 15% 100.0 91.7
       
Total Score 100.0% 83.7 79.1

Final Ranking 1 2

Personal Rating (2.5%): Purely subjective. After the test, each participating editor was asked to rank the vehicles in order of preference based on which he or she would buy if money were no object.

Recommended Rating (2.5%): After the test, each participating editor was asked to rank the vehicles in order of preference based on which he or she thought would be best for the average consumer shopping in this segment.

28-Point Evaluation (20%): Each participating editor ranked both vehicles based on a comprehensive 28-point evaluation. The evaluation covered everything from exterior design to cupholders. Scoring was calculated on a point system, and the scores listed are averages based on all test participants' evaluations.

Feature Content (20%): For this category, the editors picked the top 6 features they thought would be most beneficial to the consumer shopping in this segment. For each vehicle, the score was based on the number of actual features each car had versus the total possible (six). Standard and optional equipment were taken into consideration.

Performance Testing (25%): Each vehicle was run through Inside Line's regimen of standardized instrumented tests: acceleration (0-60 and quarter-mile), braking (60-0), 600-foot slalom and 200-foot-diameter skid pad. Points were awarded as a percentage of the best overall performance in each test.

Fuel Consumption (15%): The numbers listed were the result of a simple percentage calculation based on the EPA's "combined" fuel-economy estimates for the cars in the comparison test. Assigning 100 to the most fuel-efficient vehicle, the less efficient vehicle received a resulting percentage value.

Price (15%): The numbers listed were the result of a simple percentage calculation based on the less expensive vehicle in the comparison test. Using the "as tested" prices of the actual evaluation vehicles, the less expensive vehicle received a score of 100, with the remaining vehicle receiving a lesser score based on how much each one costs.

Vehicle
Model year2010
MakeMitsubishi
ModelLancer Evolution
StyleMR Touring 4dr Sedan AWD (2.0L 4cyl Turbo 6AM)
Base MSRP$41,735
Options on test vehicleNone
As-tested MSRP$43,984
Drivetrain
Drive typeAll-wheel drive
Engine typeInline-4
Displacement (cc/cu-in)1,998cc (122 cu-in)
Block/head materialAluminum, aluminum
ValvetrainDouble overhead camshaft
Compression ratio (x:1)9.0
Redline (rpm)7,000
Horsepower (hp @ rpm)291 @ 6,500
Torque (lb-ft @ rpm)300 @ 4,000
Fuel typePremium unleaded (required)
Transmission typeSix-speed automated manual
Transmission and axle ratios (x:1)I=3.655, II=2.368, III=1.754, IV=1.322, V=1.008, VI=0.775, final drive=4.062
Chassis
Suspension, frontModified MacPherson strut
Suspension, rearMultilink
Steering typePower steering
Steering ratio (x:1)13.3:1
Tire brandYokohama
Tire modelAdvan A13
Tire typePerformance
Tire size, frontP245/40R18 Y
Tire size, rearP245/40R18 Y
Wheel size18-by-8.5 inches front and rear
Wheel materialAlloy
Brakes, frontVentilated disc
Brakes, rearVentilated disc
Track Test Results
Acceleration, 0-30 mph (sec.)2.0
0-45 mph (sec.)3.3
0-60 mph (sec.)5.0
0-75 mph (sec.)7.3
1/4-mile (sec. @ mph)13.4 @ 101.1
0-60 with 1 foot of rollout (sec.)4.7
Braking, 30-0 mph (ft.)29
60-0 mph (ft.)115
Slalom, 6 x 100 ft. (mph)69.7 ESC off
Slalom, 6 x 100 ft. (mph) ESC ON69.5 ESC on
Skid pad, 200-ft. diameter (lateral g).93 ESC off
Skid pad, 200-ft. diameter (lateral g) ESC ON.89 ESC on
Sound level @ idle (dB)50.3
@ Full throttle (dB)76.7
@ 70 mph cruise (dB)70.1
Test Driver Ratings & Comments
Acceleration commentsSST/launch control still doesn't leave the line like a car with a manual transmission. What's more, its activation complexity is a real deterent in ever using it.
Braking ratingGood
Braking commentsPedal feels a bit wooden at the limit -- not as effective as I'd like. This is common to all Evos. Perhaps a bad material choice?
Handling ratingExcellent
Handling commentsEvo's all-nerves tuning makes it responsive on the skid pad where it's more adjustable than the 335i. Evo has a better slalom potential than we recorded in this test. Rapid turn-in coupled with less-than-ideal damping control makes it somewhat nervous in this test.
Testing Conditions
Elevation (ft.)1,121
Temperature (F)60.0
Wind (mph, direction)3.12 mph head/crosswind
Fuel Consumption
EPA fuel economy (mpg)17 city/22 highway
Edmunds observed (mpg)18.3
Fuel tank capacity (U.S. gal.)14.5
Dimensions & Capacities
Curb weight, mfr. claim (lbs.)3,594
Length (in.)177.0
Width (in.)71.3
Height (in.)58.3
Wheelbase (in.)104.3
Track, front (in.)60.8
Track, rear (in.)60.8
Turning circle (ft.)38.7
Legroom, front (in.)42.5
Legroom, rear (in.)33.3
Headroom, front (in.)40.6
Headroom, rear (in.)36.9
Shoulder room, front (in.)54.7
Shoulder room, rear (in.)54.3
Seating capacity5
Cargo volume (cu-ft)6.9
Max. cargo volume, seats folded (cu-ft)6.9
Warranty
Bumper-to-bumper3 years/36,000 miles
Powertrain5 years/60,000 miles
Corrosion7 years/100,000 miles
Roadside assistance5 years/Unlimited miles
Free scheduled maintenanceNot available
Safety
Front airbagsStandard
Side airbagsStandard dual front
Head airbagsStandard front and rear
Knee airbagsDriver only
Antilock brakesFour-wheel ABS
Electronic brake enhancementsElectronic brakeforce distribution
Traction controlStandard
Stability controlStandard
Rollover protectionNA
Tire-pressure monitoring systemTire-pressure monitoring
Emergency assistance systemNot available
NHTSA crash test, driverNot tested
NHTSA crash test, passengerNot tested
NHTSA crash test, side frontNot tested
NHTSA crash test, side rearNot tested
NHTSA rollover resistanceNot tested
IIHS offsetNot tested
Vehicle
Model year2010
MakeBMW
Model3 Series
Style335i 4dr Sedan (3.0L 6cyl Turbo 6M)
Base MSRP$41,475
Options on test vehicleiPod and USB Adapter, Dakota Leather, Metallic Paint, M Sport Package
As-tested MSRP$47,625
Drivetrain
Drive typeRear-wheel drive
Engine typeInline-6
Displacement (cc/cu-in)2,979cc (182 cu-in)
Block/head materialAluminum, aluminum
ValvetrainDouble overhead camshaft
Compression ratio (x:1)10.2
Redline (rpm)7,000
Horsepower (hp @ rpm)300 @ 5,800
Torque (lb-ft @ rpm)300 @ 1,400
Fuel typePremium unleaded (required)
Transmission typeSix-speed manual
Transmission and axle ratios (x:1)I=4.171:1, II=2.34:1, III=1.521:1, IV=1.143:1, V=0.867:1, VI=0.691:1, Final drive=3.46:1
Chassis
Suspension, frontMacPherson strut
Suspension, rearMultilink
Steering typeSpeed-proportional power steering
Steering ratio (x:1)16.0:1
Tire brandBridgestone
Tire modelPotenza RE050 I
Tire typeSummer run-flat
Tire size, front225/40R18
Tire size, rear255/35R18
Wheel size18-by-8 inches front -- 18-by-8.5 inches rear
Wheel materialAlloy
Brakes, frontVentilated disc
Brakes, rearVentilated disc
Track Test Results
Acceleration, 0-30 mph (sec.)2.1
0-45 mph (sec.)3.6
0-60 mph (sec.)5.2
0-75 mph (sec.)7.6
1/4-mile, mfr. claim (sec. @ mph)13.4 @ 103.5
0-60 with 1 foot of rollout (sec.)4.9
Braking, 30-0 mph (ft.)27
60-0 mph (ft.)109
Slalom, 6 x 100 ft. (mph)69.5
Slalom, 6 x 100 ft. (mph) ESC ON67.8
Skid pad, 200-ft. diameter (lateral g).92
Skid pad, 200-ft. diameter (lateral g) ESC ON.89
Sound level @ idle (dB)47.9
@ Full throttle (dB)75.5
@ 70 mph cruise (dB)60.3
Test Driver Ratings & Comments
Acceleration commentsBest launch with no wheelspin. Still an industry-standard shifter - fast, slow, smooth, abrupt - it doesn't care. Some throttle lag between shifts.
Braking ratingVery Good
Braking commentsPedal effectiveness not as immediate as Evo but otherwise better feel and confidence.
Handling ratingExcellent
Handling commentsSmooth, predictable buildup to very high grip is, as we've come to expect, intuitive and easy to control. Superb balance. Impressively easy to drive through slalom, with very approachable limits. Easy transition to oversteer. Textbook rear-wheel drive.
Testing Conditions
Elevation (ft.)1,121
Temperature (F)57.12
Wind (mph, direction)2.19 mph head/crosswind
Fuel Consumption
EPA fuel economy (mpg)17 city/26 highway
Edmunds observed (mpg)20.3
Fuel tank capacity (U.S. gal.)16.1
Dimensions & Capacities
Curb weight, mfr. claim (lbs.)3,605
Length (in.)178.2
Width (in.)71.5
Height (in.)55.9
Wheelbase (in.)108.7
Track, front (in.)59.1
Track, rear (in.)59.6
Turning circle (ft.)36.1
Legroom, front (in.)41.5
Legroom, rear (in.)34.6
Headroom, front (in.)38.5
Headroom, rear (in.)37.5
Shoulder room, front (in.)55.4
Shoulder room, rear (in.)55.1
Seating capacity5
Cargo volume (cu-ft)12.0
Max. cargo volume, seats folded (cu-ft)12.0
Warranty
Bumper-to-bumper4 years/50,000 miles
Powertrain4 years/50,000 miles
Corrosion12 years/Unlimited miles
Roadside assistance4 years/Unlimited miles
Free scheduled maintenance4 years/50,000 miles
Safety
Front airbagsStandard
Side airbagsStandard dual front
Head airbagsStandard front and rear
Knee airbagsNot available
Antilock brakesFour-wheel ABS
Electronic brake enhancementsBraking assist, electronic brakeforce distribution
Traction controlStandard
Stability controlStandard
Rollover protectionN/A
Tire-pressure monitoring systemTire-pressure monitoring
Emergency assistance systemNot available
NHTSA crash test, driver4 stars
NHTSA crash test, passenger4 stars
NHTSA crash test, side front5 stars
NHTSA crash test, side rear5 stars
NHTSA rollover resistance4 stars
IIHS offsetGood
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Edmunds Insurance Estimator

The Edmunds TCO® estimated monthly insurance payment for a 2010 BMW 3 Series in VA is:

$138 per month*
* Explanation
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