Writers Heart Wagons - 2011 Acura TSX Sport Wagon Long-Term Road Test
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2011 Acura TSX Sport Wagon Long Term Road Test

  • Full Review
  • Pricing & Specs
  • Road Tests (3)
  • Comparison
  • Long-Term (85)

2011 Acura TSX Sport Wagon: Writers Heart Wagons

March 08, 2011

TSX Wag-nav traffic_02-web.jpg

The TSX Sport Wagon's nav-traffic update is pleasantly easy to use. Coming up on some slowing this morning, I hit the Info button, rotated the dial to Traffic Incidents, and saw that I'd be loping along at 45 mph for about the next mile. And it was surprisingly accurate, at least on the distance. It reported several other incidents ahead that turned out to be nothing. I rarely bother with nav-traffic features anymore as they're often buried in multiple menu layers and never seem as accurate as a basic Google traffic app.

Common perception among readers is that all automotive writers love wagons. That we're somehow affecting some European preference for extended hatchbacks. But that hasn't been my experience.

At least around the Edmunds and Inside Line desks, only muscle cars, rally cars, Mustangs, Porsches, Ducatis and mountain bikes inspire the sort of bickering that ends in hurt feelings and vague threats of reprisal during performance reviews. Wagons just don't get us all that pumped.

We like 'em well enough, sure. We praised the A4 Avant. No one was gonna go to blows over it, but it always had a driver. The TSX wagon will earn a similar fanbase around the office, guaranteed. It's no Avant. But it is comfortable. It's techy and firmly sprung, giving some life to expansion joints, road stubble and transition sweepers. It's got more cargo capacity (60.5 cu ft) than our departed Crosstour (51.3) or Avant (50.5), and it's geared to wring the most out of its 201 horsepower.

In our long-term intro, some readers pinned it as a torque-less, low-power bore. On paper, sure. But on the road, especially when bubbling in its sweet spot (about 70 mph @ 2,500 rpm), it's got plenty of step. Passing maneuvers are especially enjoyable. Set up your move, check your lanes, and click off a paddle downshift. Instant VTEC and a slingshot around the obstacle.

If you can stomach the price -- and at $35,470 for our long-termer, many can't -- it's not a bad way to spend a lengthy commute, especially if the route features clockwork congestion and regular collisions.

Dan Frio, Automotive Editor

  • Full Review
  • Pricing & Specs
  • Road Tests (3)
  • Comparison
  • Long-Term (255)

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